B
Committee Biographies

ANTHONY J. BRODERICK, Chair, is an independent aviation safety consultant who works with international airlines, aerospace firms, a major aircraft manufacturer, and governments. Before retiring from his post as associate administrator for regulation and certification in the FAA, Mr. Broderick served for 11 years as the senior career aviation safety official in the U.S. government. He led the FAA’s development of the International Aviation Safety Assessment program and was also instrumental in leading international efforts to establish certification and operational standards for safety. Prior to this appointment, Mr. Broderick spent 14 years at the FAA and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), and 7 years in private industry. His portfolio also includes a background in civil aviation security; aviation environmental issues; management of the FAA evaluation, currency, and transportation flying programs; and oversight of the FAA flight inspection program. Mr. Broderick is a private pilot. He has received many awards and recognition for his work in the aeronautics industry and is a fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society. He is a member of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board and has served on two other NRC studies—as a member of the Panel on Transportation for Science and Technology for Countering Terrorism and of the Committee on Aeronautics Research and Technology for Environmental Compatibility.


PAUL BEVILAQUA is manager of advanced programs at the Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company. He joined Lockheed Martin as chief aeronautical scientist of the Lockheed Advanced Aeronautics Company and



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B Committee Biographies ANTHONy J. BRODERICK, Chair, is an independent aviation safety consultant who works with international airlines, aerospace firms, a major aircraft manufacturer, and governments. Before retiring from his post as associate administrator for regulation and certification in the FAA, Mr. Broderick served for 11 years as the senior career aviation safety offi- cial in the U.S. government. He led the FAA’s development of the Inter- national Aviation Safety Assessment program and was also instrumental in leading international efforts to establish certification and operational standards for safety. Prior to this appointment, Mr. Broderick spent 14 years at the FAA and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), and 7 years in private industry. His portfolio also includes a background in civil aviation security; aviation environmental issues; management of the FAA evaluation, currency, and transportation flying programs; and oversight of the FAA flight inspection program. Mr. Broderick is a private pilot. He has received many awards and recognition for his work in the aeronautics industry and is a fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society. He is a member of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board and has served on two other NRC studies—as a member of the Panel on Transportation for Sci- ence and Technology for Countering Terrorism and of the Committee on Aeronautics Research and Technology for Environmental Compatibility. PAUL BEVILAQUA is manager of advanced programs at the Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company. He joined Lockheed Martin as chief aero- nautical scientist of the Lockheed Advanced Aeronautics Company and 

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 APPENDIX B became chief engineer of advanced development projects in the Lockheed Martin Skunk Works. During that time he played a leading role in cre- ating the Joint Strike Fighter program and invented the lift fan propul- sion system that makes it possible to build variants of a single stealthy, supersonic V/STOL aircraft for the Air Force, Marines, and Navy. Prior to joining Lockheed Martin, he managed advanced programs at Rockwell International’s Navy aircraft plant. He began his career as a captain in the U.S. Air Force and deputy director of the Energy Conversion Labora- tory at Wright Patterson Air Force Base. Dr. Bevilaqua has a B.S. from the University of Notre Dame and graduate engineering degrees from Purdue University. He is a member of the NAE and a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). He is the recipient of an Air Force Scientific Achievement Award for his contributions to turbu- lence theory, the AIAA Newbold Award for his contributions to V/STOL aircraft technology, the AIAA and Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) aircraft design awards for his contributions to aircraft design, and the Collier Trophy for his lift fan propulsion system. His publications include articles in the journals of the AIAA, the journals of the Royal Aeronauti- cal Society, and the proceedings of many meetings and symposia. He has served on three other NRC committees: the Committee on Sea Basing: Ensuring Joint Force Access from the Sea, the Panel on Aerodynamics and Aeroacoustics of the Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics, and the Panel on Air and Ground Vehicle Technology. JEFFREy CROUCH is a senior technical fellow in the enabling technology and research organization at Boeing Commercial Airplanes. Dr. Crouch received his Ph.D. in engineering mechanics from Virginia Tech. Prior to joining the Boeing Company in 1992, he was an ONT postdoctoral fellow at the Naval Research Laboratory. His responsibilities at Boeing include research, consultation, and technology development. His research has considered topics in hydrodynamic stability, boundary-layer transition prediction, laminar-flow control, transonic-buffet prediction, wake-vortex instabilities, and modeling and control of wake vortices. Dr. Crouch’s research on wake vortices led to the discovery of new instabilities and new concepts for wake vortex alleviation. He has published over 50 papers and recently was co-editor of a special issue of the French Academy of Sciences journal Comptes Rendus Physique entitled “Airplane Trailing Vortices.” FREDERICK GREGORy is the managing director of aerospace and defense strategies at Lohfeld Consulting Group. He retired as the deputy administrator of NASA in 2005. Management positions at NASA included acting administrator, associate administrator for spaceflight, and associate

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 APPENDIX B administrator, Office of Safety and Mission Assurance. He was selected as an astronaut in January 1978 and has logged 455 hours in space. He grad- uated from the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School and served as an engineering test pilot for the Air Force and for NASA, retiring from the Air Force as a colonel in 1993. He has authored or co-authored several papers in the areas of aircraft handling qualities and cockpit design. Mr. Gregory holds a B.S. from the U.S. Air Force Academy and a master’s degree in infor- mation systems from George Washington University. He is a member or past member of numerous societies, including the Society of Experimental Test Pilots, American Helicopter Society, AIAA, and the Tuskegee Air- men. Mr. Gregory has received numerous awards from the military and NASA, as well as honorary doctorates from the College of Aeronautics, the University of the District of Columbia, and Southeastern University. In 2004 and 2005, he was designated one of the “50 Most Important Blacks in Technology.” He holds an FAA commercial and instrument certificate for single- and multiengine airplanes and helicopters, having logged 7,000 hours. FAzLE HUSSAIN is the Cullen Distinguished Professor at the University of Houston (UH) and director of the Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Turbulence. After his Ph.D. at Stanford and postdoctoral research at Johns Hopkins, he joined UH in 1971. His primary research interest is turbulent flows and vortex dynamics, with an emphasis on coherent structures. He has authored over 220 technical papers and has presented numerous key- note and invited lectures at major conferences. He has served as associate editor on the Journal of Fluids Engineering and Physics of Fluids. Dr. Hussain has received four of the most coveted awards in fluid dynamics: the Freeman Scholar Award from the American Society of Mechanical Engi- neers (ASME), the Fluid Dynamics Prize from the American Physical Society (APS), the Fluids Engineering Award from the ASME, and the Fluid Dynamics Award from the AIAA. He is a fellow of the AIAA, APS, and ASME, and he served as chair of the Fluid Dynamics Division of APS. He is a member of the NAE and an officer in the NAE Mechanical Engineering Section and has served on one other NRC studythe Com- mittee for Naval Hydromechanics Science and Technologyin addition to numerous other advisory panels. BILL F. JEFFERS recently retired as senior director of FAA programs at ARINC, Inc. Prior to that, he spent over 30 years at the FAA, in positions from air traffic controller through senior management. In his most recent position, associate administrator for air traffic, he provided executive direction for all organizations in the Air Traffic Service, including direct- ing, coordinating, controlling, and ensuring the safe and efficient use of

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 APPENDIX B the National Airspace System. He attended Athens State College, Mon- tevallo University, and the Kellogg School of Northwestern University. Mr. Jeffers is a member of the Air Traffic Control Association and the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA). He is a former chair of the Program Management Committee of the Radio Technical Commis- sion for Aeronautics (RTCA), a former member of the RTCA Free Flight Steering Committee, and a current member of the Air Traffic Management Advisory Committee’s (ATMAC’s) Requirements and Planning Working Group and the NBAA Airspace and Air Traffic Committee. DENNIS W. NEWTON is an independent consultant and designated engineering representative flight test pilot for both small and transport airplanes. He currently serves on the SAE AC-9C Icing Subcommittee and the Society of Experimental Test Pilots’ Flight Test Safety Committee. He has a B.S. in engineering science and an M.S. in meteorology from the Pennsylvania State University. Throughout his career he has worked as a test and research pilot for the Boeing Company, the FAA, LearFan Ltd., Cessna, and the meteorology department of Pennsylvania State University. Mr. Newton wrote the textbook Severe Weather Flying, as well as numer- ous technical papers and magazine articles. He is a fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society, an associate fellow of the AIAA, and a member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots. In 2005, he was awarded the Losey Atmospheric Sciences Award from the AIAA. Mr. Newton holds Airline Transport Pilot type ratings in six jet and three turboprop airplanes and is instructor-rated in single- and multiengine airplanes and gliders. DUNG PHU “CHI” NGUyEN is a director of aerospace engineering with more than 17 years of industry experience in aeronautical and space systems. As an employee of Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Dr. Nguyen has made significant contributions to NASA’s Aviation Safety Program, including Enhanced Vision Systems, and to the Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS) and has developed a unique RTI capability in data processing for radar, lidar, and electro-optical sensor systems. He has provided expertise on selected NASA Engineering Safety Center teams for independent assessment of space shuttle and International Space Station anomalies. Dr. Nguyen has worked with and is familiar with many air- craft surveillance (active and passive) technologies and airport reporting databases. He has extensive field testing and flight testing experience. In addition to his engineering skills, Dr. Nguyen has extensive operational experience with software systems. He has published numerous techni- cal reports and has coauthored conference papers on wake vortex lidar, sensor systems, and space exploration concepts. Dr. Nguyen is also an

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 APPENDIX B active associate professor at the George Washington University School of Engineering and Applied Science. He teaches graduate engineering courses in operational research, statistics, decision analysis, and technol- ogy management. J. DAVID POWELL is an emeritus professor in the Aeronautics and Astronautics Department at Stanford University, from which he received M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in 1966 and 1970, respectively. He received a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1960. Dr. Powell has been on the Stanford faculty since 1971. He continues to be active in research since becoming emeritus in 1998. His research interests included space tether dynamics and control, internal combustion engine control, and the design of aerospace digital flight control systems. More recently, his research focus has been GPS-based attitude determination augmented with inertial sensors, the use of GPS for air and land vehicle surveillance and navigation, and the design of GPS-aided flight displays that include the depiction of wake vortices. He is the author of more than 100 research papers and two of the leading control textbooks. Dr. Powell is a fellow of AIAA and ASME and is an aircraft owner and instrument-rated pilot. He has served on other NRC committees, including the Panel on Airspace Systems for the Review of NASA’s Revolutionize Aviation Program. ALFRED T. SPAIN retired as senior vice president of operations at Jet- Blue Airways Corporation in May 2006. Previously, he served in various capacities at Continental Airlines, including as vice president of flight operations for Continental Micronesia, Inc. Prior to that, he was a pilot and instructor for over 20 years. Mr. Spain has a B.S. in professional avia- tion from Louisiana Technical University and an MBA from Concordia University. He is a senior member of the AIAA, a life member of the Navy League of the United States, and a member of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and the Seaplane Pilots Association. He has experience in the senior management of flight operations for domestic and interna- tional airlines as well as civilian and military experience in safety appli- cations for both flight and ground operations. Mr. Spain is pilot-rated in numerous multiengine and turbine-powered aircraft. ROBERT P. “ROCKy” STONE is the chief technical pilot for United Airlines. He currently flies as a Boeing 737 captain, and he has previous experience as an experimental test pilot in the U.S. Air Force. He earned his B.S. in aerospace engineering from MIT and an M.S. in systems man- agement from the University of Southern California. Mr. Stone is the

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0 APPENDIX B co-chair of RTCA SC-186, responsible for writing technical standards for ADS-B. He also chairs the meteorology subgroup of RTCA SC-206 on AIS/FIS Data Link. KAREN WILLCOx is associate professor of aeronautics and astronautics in the Aerospace Computational Design Laboratory at MIT. She received a B.Eng. from the University of Auckland in 1994 and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in aeronautics and astronautics from MIT in 1996 and 2000, respectively. She spent 1 year as a visiting researcher at Boeing Phantom Works in Long Beach, working with the blended-wing-body design team. She joined the faculty of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics in the fall of 2001. Dr. Willcox’s research interests lie in the computational simulation and optimization of engineering systems. Her research focuses first on model reduction for large-scale systems, with applications in active flow control, aeroelasticity, and variable-fidelity design methods, and second in multidisciplinary system design and optimization, with particular emphasis on economic and environmental factors in aircraft conceptual design. She served on the NRC Panel on Aerodynamics and Aeroacoustics for the Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics.