Appendix B
Membership of the Army Research Laboratory Technical Assessment Board and Its Panels



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2005–2006 Assessment of the Army Research Laboratory Appendix B Membership of the Army Research Laboratory Technical Assessment Board and Its Panels

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2005–2006 Assessment of the Army Research Laboratory FIGURE B.1 Army Reaearch Laboratory Technical Assessment Board and Panels, 2006.

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2005–2006 Assessment of the Army Research Laboratory BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF BOARD MEMBERS ROBERT W. BRODERSEN, Chair, is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the John Whinnery Chair Professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at the University of California, Berkeley, and co-scientific director of the Berkeley Wireless Research Center. His expertise is in solid-state circuitry and microelectronics, and his current research is in new applications of integrated circuits focused on the areas of low-power design and wireless communications and the CAD tools necessary to support these activities. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and has received numerous prestigious awards throughout his career. Professor Brodersen received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. KIM K. BALDRIDGE is director of computational applications and professor of theoretical chemistry at the University of Zurich, Switzerland. She additionally holds a distinguished scientist position at the San Diego Supercomputer Center and adjunct professorship in the Department of Chemistry at the University of California, San Diego. Her expertise covers a wide area of computational chemistry, including direct application of quantum chemical software; development of new quantum chemical algorithms; and development of visualization, middleware, database, and analysis tools for adaptation of computational chemistry and biochemistry applications to grid environments. Dr. Baldridge is a fellow of the American Physical Society and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She is a coauthor of a major computational chemistry software package used worldwide, and has a publication list of 120 research articles. PHILLIP COLELLA is a senior mathematician and group leader of the applied numerical algorithms group in the Computational Research Division at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. His expertise is in numerical methods for partial differential equations and their application to science and engineering problems. He is a recipient of the IEEE Computer Society’s Sidney Fernbach Award (1998) and the SIAM/ACM prize in computational science (2003), and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (2004). Dr. Colella is also a current member of the Armor and Armaments Panel and the Digitization and Communications Science Panel. CLIVE L. DYM (Board member in 2005) is the Fletcher Jones Professor of Engineering Design and director of the Center for Design Education at Harvey Mudd College. His primary interests are in engineering design and structural mechanics. After receiving the Ph.D. from Stanford University, Dr. Dym held appointments at the University at Buffalo; the Institute for Defense Analyses; Carnegie Mellon University; Bolt, Beranek and Newman; and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He was also head of his department at UMass (1977-1985) and chair of his department at Harvey Mudd (1999-2002). Dr. Dym has held visiting appointments at the TECHNION-Israel Institute of Technology, the Institute for Sound and Vibration Research at Southampton, Stanford, Xerox PARC, Carnegie Mellon, Northwestern, and the University of Southern California. He has authored or coauthored 10 books and more than 100 archival publications and technical reports. Dr. Dym was founding editor of the journal Artificial Intelligence for Engineering Design, Analysis, and Manufacturing, and is currently associate editor of ASME’s Journal of Mechanical Design. Dr. Dym’s awards include the Walter L. Huber Research Prize (ASCE, 1980), the Boeing Outstanding Educator Award (first runner-up, 2001), the Fred Merryfield Design Award (ASEE, 2002), the Joel and Ruth Spira Outstanding Design Educator Award (ASME, 2004), and the Archie Higdon Distinguished Educator Award (Mechanics Division, ASEE, 2006).

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2005–2006 Assessment of the Army Research Laboratory DOUGLAS H. HARRIS is chairman and principal scientist of Anacapa Sciences, a company that he formed in 1969 to improve human performance in complex systems and organizations. His principal contributions have been in the areas of inspection, investigation, intelligence, and maintenance performance. Dr. Harris is a past president of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, a past chair of the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on Human Factors, and past member of the NRC Committee on Commercial Aviation Security. He was an author of the first volume of the Wiley Series in Human Factors (Human Factors and Quality Assurance) and was chair of an NRC panel that produced the book Organizational Linkages: Understanding the Productivity Paradox. As an officer in the U.S. Navy, he completed underwater demolition training and served as the operations and training officer of an underwater demolition team. ALFRED O. HERO is a professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, the Department of Biomedical Engineering, and the Department of Statistics at the University of Michigan. His expertise includes statistical signal and image processing, detection and estimation theory, adaptive sensor networks, bioinformatics, and tomographical imaging. He has held visiting positions at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of Nice, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Télécommunications, Scientific Research Labs of the Ford Motor Company, Ecole Nationale des Techniques Avancées, Ecole Supérieure d’Electricité, Lucent Bell Laboratories, and MIT Lincoln Laboratory. In addition, throughout his career, Dr. Hero has served the IEEE in various leadership roles and has received a number of prestigious honors, awards, and fellowships, including an IEEE Signal Processing Society Meritorious Service Award and the IEEE Third Millennium Medal. He is a fellow of the IEEE and was named a William Clay Ford Fellow by Ford Motor Company in 1992. He was chair of USNC URSI Commission C and is president of the IEEE Signal Processing Society. He received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Princeton University. S. MICHAEL HUDSON retired in 2002 from the position of vice chairman of Rolls-Royce North America. After Allison Engine Company was acquired by Rolls-Royce, Mr. Hudson served as president, chief executive officer, chief operating officer, and as a member of the board of directors of Allison Engine Company. Previously, during his tenure at Allison, he served as executive vice president for engineering, chief engineer for advanced technology engines, chief engineer for small production engines, supervisor of the design for Model 250 engines, and chief of preliminary design and chief project engineer in vehicular gas turbines. Mr. Hudson recently acquired a company involved in the development and manufacture of alternative energy and cogeneration products. He is a member of the NRC’s Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board and has served as a member of several of its committees. PETER M. KOGGE is associate dean of engineering for research and also holds the McCourtney Chair in Computer Science and Engineering (CSE) at the University of Notre Dame. Prior to his joining Notre Dame in 1994, he was with IBM Federal Systems Division, and was appointed an IEEE fellow in 1990 and an IBM fellow in 1993. In 1977, he was a visiting professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. From 1977 through 1994, he was also an adjunct professor in the Computer Science Department of the State University of New York at Binghamton. Since the summer of 1997, he has been a distinguished visiting scientist at the Center for Integrated Space Microsystems at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He is also the Research Thrust Leader for Architecture in Notre Dame’s Center for Nano Science and Technology. For the 2000-2001 academic year, he was the interim Schubmehl-Prein Chairman of the CSE Department at Notre Dame. Since the fall of 2003, he has also been a concurrent professor of electrical engineering. His research interests are

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2005–2006 Assessment of the Army Research Laboratory in advanced computer architectures using unconventional technologies, such as “Processing-in-Memory,” and nanotechnologies, such as Quantum Dot Cellular Automata (QCA). JOHN C. SOMMERER is director of science and technology and chief technology officer of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL). He manages APL’s overall R&D program, and oversees APL’s technology transfer program, its participation in JHU education programs, and serves as primary technical liaison with the academic divisions of the university. In addition, he is an adjunct faculty member in applied physics, applied mathematics, and technical management. Dr. Sommerer has made internationally recognized theoretical and experimental contributions to the fields of nonlinear dynamics and complex systems. He has served on several technical advisory bodies for the U.S. government, including his current assignment as vice chair of the Naval Research Advisory Council, the senior technical advisory body to the Secretary of the Navy, the Chief of Naval Operations, and the Commandant of the Marine Corps. He holds a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Maryland. DWIGHT C. STREIT is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and vice president, foundation technologies at Northrop Grumman Space Technology. He has overall responsibility for development of the basic engineering, science, and technology required for space and communication systems. He has extensive experience in semiconductor devices and Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits for applications up to 220 gigahertz, as well as in infrared and radiometer sensors. He has led development efforts for 10-40 gigabit-per-second optical communication systems, and has experience in the development and production of opto-electronic devices and circuits. He also has previous experience in frequency-modulated continuous wave and phased-array product development for X-band to W-band radar applications. He received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1986. DENNIS W. THOMSON is a professor and former department head in the Department of Meteorology at Pennsylvania State University. His expertise is in atmospheric physics and remote sensing, and his major research interests are atmospheric electromagnetic and acoustic propagation phenomena, remote sensing of winds and turbulence, atmospheric sounds and noise propagation, micrometeorology, and defense technology and policy. Dr. Thomson has received a number of prestigious awards; he is a fellow of the American Meteorological Society (AMS), and a former Intergovernmental Personnel Act (IPA) fellow to the Office of Naval Research. Other off-campus assignments for Dr. Thomson, on Penn State’s faculty for more than 36 years, include Risoe National Laboratory, Denmark, and the Naval Postgraduate School. His national science community responsibilities have included a term as trustee of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, a number of DoD oversight and advisory committees, and extended service to Argonne National Laboratory and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. He is a multidegree graduate in physics and meteorology (Ph.D.) of the University of Wisconsin. JOHN D. VENABLES received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Warwick, England, and until his retirement he served as associate director and chief scientist at Martin Marietta Labs in Baltimore, Maryland. He has served on numerous study committees of the National Academies and was a member for 6 years of the Board on Army Science and Technology. He is a coauthor of an entry in the Encyclopedia Britannica, “Materials Science,” and is currently a consultant for DARPA/DSO through Strategic Analysis Inc.

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2005–2006 Assessment of the Army Research Laboratory Staff JAMES P. McGEE is the director of the Army Research Laboratory Technical Assessment Board (ARLTAB) and the Board on Assessment of National Institute of Standards and Technology Programs, within the Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences at the National Research Council. Since 1994, he has been a senior staff officer at the National Research Council, directing projects in the areas of systems engineering and applied psychology, including the Panel on Soldier Systems for the Army Research Laboratory Technical Assessment Board; the Committee on National Statistics’ Panel on Operational Testing and Evaluation of the Stryker Vehicle and its Committee on Assessing the National Science Foundation’s (NSF’s) Scientists and Engineers Statistical Data System; the Committee on the Health and Safety Needs of Older Workers; and the Steering Committee on Differential Susceptibility of Older Persons to Environmental Hazards. He has also served as staff officer for NRC projects on Air Traffic Control Automation, Musculoskeletal Disorders and the Workplace, and The Changing Nature of Work. Prior to joining the NRC, he held technical and management positions in systems engineering and applied psychology at IBM, General Electric, RCA, General Dynamics, and United Technologies corporations. He received his B.A. from Princeton University and his Ph.D. from Fordham University, both in psychology, and for several years taught postsecondary courses in applied psychology and in organizational management. CY L. BUTNER is a senior program officer with the ARL Technical Assessment Board. Shortly after joining the NRC in 1997, he moved from the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board to his current appointment. Before joining the NRC, Mr. Butner served as an independent consultant to the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board for 2 years, during which time he supported an ongoing peer review process for Air Force Office of Scientific Research proposals, and several reports on topics related to space and aeronautics programs. From 1985 until 1994, Mr. Butner worked with two aerospace consulting firms, where he supported space and aeronautics technology development programs at NASA Headquarters. Before that, he worked for RCA as a satellite solar array engineer, for NASA at the Goddard Space Flight Center as a science coop student and a materials engineer, and for the New Mexico Environmental Improvement Agency as a statistician. Mr. Butner has B.S. and M.S. degrees in physics from the American University and a B.S. degree in mathematics from the University of New Mexico. RADHIKA S. CHARI was the administrative coordinator for the Army Research Laboratory Technical Assessment Board and the Board on Assessment of National Institute of Standards and Technology Programs of the National Research Council through July 2006. She then moved to the National Research Council’s Computer Science and Telecommunications Board. Ms. Chari received her B.A. degree in philosophy from Fordham University.

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2005–2006 Assessment of the Army Research Laboratory PANEL ROSTERS Air and Ground Vehicle Technology Panel S. Michael Hudson, Rolls-Royce North America (retired), Chair Roy Battles, Bell Helicopter TEXTRON Inc. Julie Chen, University of Massachusetts, Lowell Clive L. Dym,* Harvey Mudd College Alan H. Epstein, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Charbel H. Farhat, Stanford University Awatef Hamed, University of Cincinnati Verne L. (“Larry”) Lynn, Director, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (retired) Thomas J. Mueller, Professor Emeritus, University of Notre Dame Sia Nemat-Nasser, University of California, San Diego Kenneth Reifsnider, University of Connecticut Christine S. Sloane, General Motors Corporation Michael S. Torok, Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation Douglas Valenzuela, Northrop Grumman Corporation Armor and Armaments Panel John D. Venables, Consultant, Towson, Maryland, Chair Jan D. Achenbach,** Northwestern University Charles E. Anderson, Jr., Southwest Research Institute Melvin R. Baer, Sandia National Laboratories Kim K. Baldridge, University of Zurich Thomas B. Brill, University of Delaware Rodney J. Clifton, Brown University Phillip Colella, E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory George T. (“Rusty”) Gray III, Los Alamos National Laboratory Rigoberto Hernandez, Georgia Institute of Technology Larry G. Hill, Los Alamos National Laboratory James E. McGrath,** Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Lynne E. Parker, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory Kenneth S. Vecchio, University of California, San Diego Francis W. Zok, University of California, Santa Barbara Digitization and Communications Science Panel Peter M. Kogge, University of Notre Dame, Chair Nina M. Berry, Sandia National Laboratories Donald M. Chiarulli, University of Pittsburgh Phillip Colella, E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lori Freitag Diachin, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory * Panel chair in 2005. ** Panel member in 2005.

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2005–2006 Assessment of the Army Research Laboratory Jack Dongarra,** University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory Jonathan P. Dowling, Louisiana State University Joel S. Engel, JSE Consulting Joseph Y. Halpern, Cornell University Bruce B. Hicks, Metcorps Frank A. Horrigan, Raytheon Company (retired) Richard T. McNider,** University of Alabama, Huntsville (emeritus) Steven L. Mullen, University of Arizona Jim K. Omura, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation Daniel A. Reed, Renaissance Computing Institute Alan B. Salisbury, Independent Consultant, Oakton, Virginia Dennis W. Thomson, Pennsylvania State University David Waltz, Columbia University Eli Yablonovitch, University of California, Los Angeles Sensors and Electron Devices Panel Dwight C. Streit, Northrop Grumman Space Technology, Chair Ilesanmi Adesida, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Henry E. Bass, University of Mississippi Robert W. Brodersen, University of California, Berkeley Elton J. Cairns, E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley L. Richard Carley, Carnegie Mellon University Arthur H. Guenther, University of New Mexico Alfred O. Hero, University of Michigan Narain G. Hingorani, Hingorani Power Electronics Linda P.B. Katehi, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Leslie A. Kolodziejski, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Timothy N. Krabach, Jet Propulsion Laboratory David C. Munson, Jr., University of Michigan Zoya Popovic, University of Colorado, Boulder P. Paul Ruden, University of Minnesota Soldier Systems Panel Douglas H. Harris, Anacapa Sciences Inc., Chair Donald B. Chaffin, University of Michigan Dennis G. Faust, Lockheed Martin Corporation Robert A. Henning, University of Connecticut Bonnie Elizabeth John,** Carnegie Mellon University John D. Lee, University of Iowa Eric R. Muth, Clemson University Virginia M. Richards, University of Pennsylvania Frank E. Ritter, Pennsylvania State University Jeremy M. Wolfe, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Boston University ** Panel member in 2005.

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2005–2006 Assessment of the Army Research Laboratory Survivability and Lethality Analysis Panel John C. Sommerer, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Chair Romesh C. Batra, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Thomas K. Burris, Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company John D. Christie, Logistics Management Institute MarjorieAnn EricksonKirk, Phoenix Engineering Associates, Inc. Alan K. Jones, The Boeing Company Melvin F. Kanninen, MFK Consulting Services Richard Lloyd,** Raytheon Company John McHugh, Dalhousie University Max D. Morris, Iowa State University Hilarie K. Orman, Purple Streak Inc. Thomas J. Peters, University of Connecticut Stephen M. Pollock, University of Michigan (emeritus) John Reese, Independent Consultant, Sandy, Utah Eugene H. Spafford,** Purdue University Fritz Steudel, Independent Consultant, Pocasset, Massachusetts Jack L. Walker, Independent Consultant, Ann Arbor, Michigan Donald C. Wunsch, Independent Consultant, Albuquerque, New Mexico Quantum Computing and Communications Group Robert W. Brodersen, University of California, Berkeley, Acting Chair Jonathan P. Dowling, Louisiana State University Peter M. Kogge, University of Notre Dame Dwight C. Streit, Northrop Grumman Space Technology Eli Yablonovitch, University of California, Los Angeles ** Panel member in 2005.

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