B
Panel Biographical Information

Ward O. Winer (NAE), Chair, is the Eugene C. Gwaltney, Jr., Chair of the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology. He has responsibilities for programs not only in ME but also in nuclear engineering and medical physics. Dr. Winer's research interests include tribology (friction, lubrication, and wear), thermal systems (heat transfer and fluid mechanics), high-pressure rheology (mechanical behavior of lubricants to pressures of 3 gigapascals), and mechanical system diagnostics (development of instrumentation and methodology for predicting incipient failure in mechanical systems).


Cristina H. Amon (NAE) is dean of the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering and Alumni Professor in Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at the University of Toronto, Canada, which she joined in 2006. Previously, Amon was the Raymond J. Lane Distinguished Professor of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, and director of the Institute for Complex Engineered Systems at Carnegie Mellon University. She received a mechanical engineering degree from Simon Bolivar University in 1981 and, after two years of teaching and engineering practice, continued her education at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where she earned her M.S. and Sc.D. degrees in 1985 and 1988, respectively. Professor Amon’s research pioneered the development of computational fluid dynamics for formulating and solving thermal design problems subject to multidisciplinary competing constraints. More recently, her research group has been focused on developing numerical algorithms for submicron-and nanoscale heat transport in semiconductors (molecular dynamics, lattice-Boltzmann method, and phonon Boltzmann transport).


L. Catherine Brinson is currently the Jerome B. Cohen Professor of Engineering at Northwestern University and associate chair of the Mechanical Engineering Department with a secondary appointment in the Materials Science and Engineering Department. After receiving her Ph.D. in 1990 from the California Institute of Technology, Dr. Brinson performed postdoctoral studies in Germany at the DLR (German Air and Space Agency), and since 1992 she has been on the faculty at Northwestern University. She focuses on the modeling and characterization of advanced material systems, including high-performance composites and intelligent materials. Current research investigations involve studies of aging in polymeric-based systems, nanomechanics of nanoreinforced polymers, characterization of microporous materials for bone implants, and experiments and modeling of shape memory alloys, where investigations span molecular interactions, micromechanics, and macroscale behavior.


Earl H. Dowell (NAE) is the William Holland Hall Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science at Duke University. Professor Dowell's research interests are dynamics, fluid and solid mechanics, and acoustics. A particular focus at present is on the dynamics of nonlinear fluid and structural systems and their associated limit cycle and chaotic motions. Examples include flexible plates and shells excited by dynamic fluid forces, oscillating airfoils and wings in a transonic flow, and aeromechanical instability of rotorcraft systems. Also of interest are studies of systems with many degrees of freedom. Dr. Dowell received his B.S. in aeronautics and astronautics from the University of Illinois at



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B Panel Biographical Information Ward O. Winer (NAE), Chair, is the Eugene C. Gwaltney, Jr., Chair of the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology. He has responsibilities for programs not only in ME but also in nuclear engineering and medical physics. Dr. Winer's research interests include tribology (friction, lubrication, and wear), thermal systems (heat transfer and fluid mechanics), high- pressure rheology (mechanical behavior of lubricants to pressures of 3 gigapascals), and mechanical system diagnostics (development of instrumentation and methodology for predicting incipient failure in mechanical systems). Cristina H. Amon (NAE) is dean of the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering and Alumni Professor in Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at the University of Toronto, Canada, which she joined in 2006. Previously, Amon was the Raymond J. Lane Distinguished Professor of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, and director of the Institute for Complex Engineered Systems at Carnegie Mellon University. She received a mechanical engineering degree from Simon Bolivar University in 1981 and, after two years of teaching and engineering practice, continued her education at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where she earned her M.S. and Sc.D. degrees in 1985 and 1988, respectively. Professor Amon’s research pioneered the development of computational fluid dynamics for formulating and solving thermal design problems subject to multidisciplinary competing constraints. More recently, her research group has been focused on developing numerical algorithms for submicron- and nanoscale heat transport in semiconductors (molecular dynamics, lattice-Boltzmann method, and phonon Boltzmann transport). L. Catherine Brinson is currently the Jerome B. Cohen Professor of Engineering at Northwestern University and associate chair of the Mechanical Engineering Department with a secondary appointment in the Materials Science and Engineering Department. After receiving her Ph.D. in 1990 from the California Institute of Technology, Dr. Brinson performed postdoctoral studies in Germany at the DLR (German Air and Space Agency), and since 1992 she has been on the faculty at Northwestern University. She focuses on the modeling and characterization of advanced material systems, including high- performance composites and intelligent materials. Current research investigations involve studies of aging in polymeric-based systems, nanomechanics of nanoreinforced polymers, characterization of microporous materials for bone implants, and experiments and modeling of shape memory alloys, where investigations span molecular interactions, micromechanics, and macroscale behavior. Earl H. Dowell (NAE) is the William Holland Hall Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science at Duke University. Professor Dowell's research interests are dynamics, fluid and solid mechanics, and acoustics. A particular focus at present is on the dynamics of nonlinear fluid and structural systems and their associated limit cycle and chaotic motions. Examples include flexible plates and shells excited by dynamic fluid forces, oscillating airfoils and wings in a transonic flow, and aeromechanical instability of rotorcraft systems. Also of interest are studies of systems with many degrees of freedom. Dr. Dowell received his B.S. in aeronautics and astronautics from the University of Illinois at 83

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Urbana-Champaign, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in aeronautics and astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. John R. Howell (NAE) is the Ernest Cockrell, Jr., Memorial Chair and Baker Hughes Incorporated Centennial Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin. He has served on the College of Engineering faculty since 1978 and previously taught at the University of Houston. Dr. Howell received his B.S. and M.S. in chemical engineering and his Ph.D. in engineering from the Case Institute of Technology. His research centers on radiation heat transfer and inverse solutions of combined-mode heat transfer. He is a foreign member of the Russian Academy of Science. Marshall G. Jones (NAE) is presently a project leader in laser technology at General Electric Corporate Research and Development, which he joined in 1974. Dr. Jones holds 37 U.S. Patents. In 1994, Dr. Jones received the Black Engineer of the Year Award for Outstanding Technical Contribution in Industry and was elected a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). In 1999, Dr. Jones received the National Society of Black Engineers Pioneer of the Year Golden Torch Award. In 2000, he received the Black Engineer of the Year Award for Outstanding Alumnus Achievement. Dr. Jones earned his B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan in 1965. He earned his M.S. in 1972 and his Ph.D. in 1974 in mechanical engineering from the University of Massachusetts. He received an honorary doctor of science from the State University of New York in 1985. Chang-Jin "CJ" Kim is a professor in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department at the University of California, Los Angeles. His research is in microelectromechanical systems and nanotechnology (MEMS/Nano), including design and fabrication of Micro/Nano structures, actuators, and systems, with a focus on the use of surface tension. Upon joining the faculty at UCLA in 1993, he developed several MEMS courses and established a MEMS Ph.D. major field. He is currently the director of the Micro and Nano Manufacturing Laboratory and a subject editor for the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers-American Society of Mechanical Engineers (IEEE/ASME) Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems. Dr. Kim is the recipient of the 1995 TRW Outstanding Young Teacher Award, the 1997 National Science Foundation CAREER Award, and the 2002 Association for Laboratory Automation Achievement Award. He received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Kemper E. Lewis is professor of competitive product and process design in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and executive director of the New York State Center for Engineering Design and Industrial Innovation (NYSCEDII) at the University at Buffalo-State University of New York. His technical interests include large-scale systems design, decentralized design, decision theory, strategic product optimization, and the role of information technology in systems design and development. He received his B.S. in mechanical engineering and B.A. in mathematics from Duke University and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology, he is the recipient of numerous research and education awards. Van C. Mow (NAE/IOM) is a Stanley Dicker Professor of Biomedical Engineering and chairman of the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Columbia University. Dr. Mow was elected to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) in 1991 and Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 1998 for major contributions to orthopedic engineering, particularly understanding the physical behavior of cartilage and the arthritic process. He earned his Ph.D. in applied mechanics from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Dr. Mow has served on numerous professional committees, such as the Steering Committee of the World Association for Chinese Biomedical Engineers, and as well as several NAE and IOM committees. In 2004, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers honored Dr. Mow by establishing the Van C. Mow Medal for Excellence in Bioengineering. 84

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J. Tinsley Oden (NAE) was the founding director of the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES), which was created in January of 2003 as an expansion of the Texas Institute for Computational and Applied Mathematics, also directed by Oden for more than a decade. The institute supports broad interdisciplinary research and academic programs in computational engineering and sciences, involving four colleges and 17 academic departments within the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Oden received his B.S. in civil engineering from Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, his M.S. in structural engineering from Oklahoma State, and his Ph.D. in engineering mechanics from Oklahoma State. Dr. Oden has also received honorary doctoral degrees from universities in Portugal, Belgium, Poland, and France. Masayoshi Tomizuka is the Cheryl and John Neerhout, Jr., Distinguished Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley and is a former program director for the Dynamic Systems and Control Program/Civil and Mechanical Systems Division of the National Science Foundation. Dr. Tomizuka’s research covers control theory and its applications to various mechanical systems, adaptive control, computer-aided manufacturing, control systems and theory, digital control, dynamic systems, manufacturing, and mechanical vibrations. Dr. Tomizuka received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Keio University in Japan and his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 85

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