Appendix B
Committee Biographical Information

EDWARD J. BOUWER, Chair, is a professor of environmental engineering at the Johns Hopkins University. His research interests include biodegradation of hazardous organic chemicals in the subsurface, biofilm kinetics, water and waste treatment processes, and transport and fate of bacteria in porous media. He has (co)authored more than 150 refereed journal articles, conference proceedings, book chapters, and technical reports and serves on the managing editorial board for Biodegradation and on the editorial boards for Journal of Contaminant Hydrology and Environmental Engineering Science. Dr. Bouwer has served on several National Research Council (NRC) committees, including the U.S. National Committee for SCOPE, the committee on Environmental Remediation at Naval Facilities, and the Committee on Groundwater Cleanup Alternatives. He received a Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Stanford University. Dr. Bouwer is currently director of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Hazardous Substance Research Center at Johns Hopkins University.


RICHELLE M. ALLEN-KING is a professor of geology at the University of Buffalo in New York. She received her Ph.D. from the Department of Earth Sciences, University of Waterloo, and B.A. from the Department of Chemistry at the University of California, San Diego. Her main research interests are understanding and integrating the geochemical processes that control the fate and transport of contaminants in ground- and surface water, specifically transport and/or transformation of organic contaminants, including chlorinated solvents, hydrocarbons, and pesticides. In 2003, she was the National Ground Water Association's Darcy Distinguished Lecturer. She has served as an associate editor for the journals Ground Water and Water Resources Research. She has served on several committees for the NRC and is a former member of the Water Science and Technology Board (WSTB). She also chaired the workshop on Sustainable Underground Storage cosponsored by the NRC and the American Water Works Association Research Foundation (AwwaRF).


JONATHAN D. ARTHUR is professional geologist administrator and assistant state geologist at the Florida Department of Environmental Protection-Florida Geological Survey in Tallahassee. His research interests include hydrogeochemistry, aquifer vulnerability, and regional hydrogeologic framework mapping. Dr. Arthur’s hydrogeochemical research focuses on water-rock inter-



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Appendix B Committee Biographical Information EDWARD J. BOUWER, Chair, is a professor of environmental engineer- ing at the Johns Hopkins University. His research interests include biodegrada- tion of hazardous organic chemicals in the subsurface, biofilm kinetics, water and waste treatment processes, and transport and fate of bacteria in porous me- dia. He has (co)authored more than 150 refereed journal articles, conference proceedings, book chapters, and technical reports and serves on the managing editorial board for Biodegradation and on the editorial boards for Journal of Contaminant Hydrology and Environmental Engineering Science. Dr. Bouwer has served on several National Research Council (NRC) committees, including the U.S. National Committee for SCOPE, the committee on Environmental Remediation at Naval Facilities, and the Committee on Groundwater Cleanup Alternatives. He received a Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Stanford University. Dr. Bouwer is currently director of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Hazardous Substance Research Center at Johns Hopkins Univer- sity. RICHELLE M. ALLEN-KING is a professor of geology at the University of Buffalo in New York. She received her Ph.D. from the Department of Earth Sciences, University of Waterloo, and B.A. from the Department of Chemistry at the University of California, San Diego. Her main research interests are un- derstanding and integrating the geochemical processes that control the fate and transport of contaminants in ground- and surface water, specifically transport and/or transformation of organic contaminants, including chlorinated solvents, hydrocarbons, and pesticides. In 2003, she was the National Ground Water Association's Darcy Distinguished Lecturer. She has served as an associate edi- tor for the journals Ground Water and Water Resources Research. She has served on several committees for the NRC and is a former member of the Water Science and Technology Board (WSTB). She also chaired the workshop on Sustainable Underground Storage cosponsored by the NRC and the American Water Works Association Research Foundation (AwwaRF). JONATHAN D. ARTHUR is professional geologist administrator and as- sistant state geologist at the Florida Department of Environmental Protection- Florida Geological Survey in Tallahassee. His research interests include hydro- geochemistry, aquifer vulnerability, and regional hydrogeologic framework mapping. Dr. Arthur’s hydrogeochemical research focuses on water-rock inter- 333

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334 PROSPECTS FOR MANAGED UNDERGROUND STORAGE OF RECOVERABLE WATER action during aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) at the laboratory and field scale, with emphasis on aquifer chemical and mineralogical characterization and fate of metals and metalloids. He has served on numerous aquifer protection and ASR-related committees, including the ASR Issue Team of the South Flor- ida Ecosystem Restoration Task Force, and multiple Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) committees and workgroups. He has (co)authored numerous journal articles, technical reports, conference proceedings, and maps and has often served as co-convener, invited speaker, moderator, or panelist on hydrogeology issues. He received his doctoral degree in geology from Florida State University. WILLIAM BLOMQUIST is a professor of political science at Indiana University-Purdue University in Indianapolis (IUPUI). He is an expert on water resources policies (conjunctive water use) and has published on water policy and law. He is a member of the Research Advisory Board of the National Water Research Institute. His research interests include the formation of public policy and the management of water resources, with a particular emphasis on the roles and significance of institutions. In addition to his books Dividing the Waters, and Common Waters, Diverging Streams, his published work has appeared in Political Research Quarterly, Water International, and the Journal of the American Water Resources Association and Water Resources Research. He re- ceived his B.S. and M.A. from Ohio University and his Ph.D. from Indiana Uni- versity. JAMES CROOK is an independent consultant. His previous experience included principal water reuse technologist with CH2M Hill and director of wa- ter reuse for Black & Veatch. Before that, he worked with the California De- partment of Health Services where he directed the department's water reclama- tion and reuse program. He has developed and executed a broad range of engi- neering services for water and wastewater projects in the public and private sec- tors in the United States and abroad. He has authored numerous technical papers and reports and is an internationally recognized expert in the area of water rec- lamation and reuse. He was the principal author of water reuse guidelines pub- lished by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Agency for Inter- national Development and a water reuse assessment report published by the Wa- ter Environment Research Foundation. Dr. Crook received his B.S. in civil engi- neering from the University of Massachusetts and his M.S. and Ph.D. in envi- ronmental engineering from the University of Cincinnati. DENISE FORT is a member of the faculty at the University of New Mex- ico’s School of Law. She has been a member of the New Mexico Bar since 1976. Ms. Fort has extensive experience in environmental and natural resources law and policy. She served as chair of the Western Water Policy Review Advi-

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APPENDIX B 335 sory Commission, a presidential commission that prepared a report on western water policy concerns. In earlier positions, she served as director of New Mex- ico’s Environmental Improvement Division, as a staff representative to the Na- tional Governors Association, as an environmental attorney, and in other capaci- ties concerned with environmental and natural resource matters. She received her B.A. from St. John’s College and her J.D. from the Catholic University of America’s School of Law. PETER FOX is a professor at Arizona State University where he has been a faculty member in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering for 10 years. Dr. Fox is presently the director of the National Center for Sustainable Water Supply, which is funded by a tailored collaborative research project spon- sored by AwwaRF and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. His profes- sional interests are primarily in biological wastewater treatment and water rec- lamation, groundwater recharge, combined biological-adsorption systems an- aerobic systems and biological nutrient removal. He has focused his work on natural treatment systems and water reuse for the last seven years. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois. JORGE RESTREPO is a professor of geohydrology and director of the Hydrological Modeling Center of the Department of Geography and Geology, Florida Atlantic University. His current research interests include evapotranspi- ration in southern Florida; modeling recharge, evapotranspiration, and runoff; development of a wetland simulation model; modeling of seepage in the Ever- glades Nutrient Removal Site Test Cells; development of a generalized com- puter model to represent physical and operational behavior of a stream-aquifer system for evaluating conjunctive management of surface and groundwaters; modeling the groundwater and solute transport flow for landfill areas; develop- ment of an optimization model to support the planning of a regional ASR facil- ity along a canal system; and inferred statistical information using a hydrologic regionalization technique to infer extreme flows, average flows, and correlation structure. He received his B.A. from the Universidad Nacional, Facultad de Minas, and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Colorado State University. JOAN B. ROSE is Homer Nowlin Chair in Water Research in the Depart- ment of Fisheries and Wildlife at Michigan State University. Her research inter- ests include methods for detection of pathogens in wastewater and the environ- ment, water treatment for removal of pathogens, wastewater reuse, and occur- rence of viruses and parasites in wastewater sludge. Dr. Rose is a former vice- chair of the WSTB and has served on several NRC committees including the Committee on Drinking Water Contaminants and Committee on Potable Reuse. She received a B.S. in microbiology from the University of Arizona and an M.S.

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336 PROSPECTS FOR MANAGED UNDERGROUND STORAGE OF RECOVERABLE WATER in microbiology from the University of Wyoming. Dr. Rose received her Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Arizona. ZHUPING SHENG is an assistant professor in hydrogeology at the El Paso Agricultural Research and Extension Center (AREC) and Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering of Texas A&M University (TAMU). Prior to joining the TAMU, Dr. Sheng was lead hydrogeologist for El Paso Wa- ter Utilities (EPWU). His areas of special expertise are in hydrogeology and numerical modeling, management strategies of water resources, aquifer storage and recovery, aquifer mechanics, and geological engineering. He is developing a transboundary water resource-geohydrology research program for the Rio Grande Basin region that integrates theoretical and technological advances in planning and management of shared regional water resources, conjunctive uses of surface water and groundwater resources, water conservation, protection of water quality, and extension of the useful “life” of stressed regional aquifers. He has extensive working experience on numerical modeling of groundwater flow, assessment of groundwater availability, and evaluation of groundwater and surface water interaction. He is chairing the Aquifer Storage and Recovery Technical Committee of the American Water Resources Association. He re- ceived his Doctoral degree in hydrogeology-hydrology from the University of Nevada, Reno. CATHERINE J. SHRIER is a senior water resources engineer with Golder Associates, Inc. in Denver, Colorado. In 2001, she completed a nation- wide survey and analysis of ASR practice and regulations for the American Wa- ter Works Association. In 1998, while with the North Carolina Department of Environment, Health, and Natural Resources, she reviewed regulations for water use in an overstressed aquifer system and reviewed the state's laws and regula- tions impacting the development of that state's first ASR system. Dr. Shrier has also worked extensively with water users and habitat organizations in Colorado on the development of decision support tools to assess potential sites for groundwater recharge ponds for augmentation of streamflows and to provide waterfowl habitat. She holds a doctorate in civil engineering-water resources planning and management from Colorado State University, an M.S. in environ- mental science and engineering-environmental management and policy from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a B.S. in geology from North Carolina State University and in government from Dartmouth College. HENRY J. VAUX, JR., is a professor of resource economics, emeritus, at the University of California and associate vice president emeritus of the Univer- sity of California system. He is currently affiliated with the Department of Ag- ricultural and Resource Economics at the University of California, Berkeley. He also previously served as director of California's Center for Water Resources.

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APPENDIX B 337 His principal research interests are the economics of water use and water qual- ity. Prior to joining the University of California, he worked at the Office of Management and Budget and served on the staff of the National Water Commis- sion. He received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan. Dr. Vaux served on the NRC committees on assessment of water resources research, western water management, and ground water recharge. He was chair of the Water Science and Technology Board from 1994 to 2001. MICHAEL WEHNER is director of water quality and technology for the Orange County Water District. He manages the R&D, water quality, laboratory, and regulatory affairs departments and is responsible for monitoring of the Or- ange County groundwater basin, which is the principal source of water supply for more than 2.3 million people. Wehner managed the eight year, $10 million Santa Ana River Water Quality and Health Study to investigate the water quality and health implications of using effluent dominated Santa Ana River water for groundwater recharge. The district has operated a seawater intrusion barrier with recycled water since 1976 and is currently constructing the Groundwater Replenishment System that will provide 70 million gallons per day of reverse osmosis treated wastewater for injection into the barrier and for spreading in percolation basins. Wehner has over 30 years experience in water quality con- trol and has served on numerous panels and committees for the California De- partment of Health Services, the National Water Research Institute, the WateR- euse Foundation, and the American Water Works Research Foundation.

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