Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Michael J. Goldblatt (Co-chair), Functional Genetics

Dr. Goldblatt is the chief executive officer of Functional Genetics, a biotechnology company engaged in the development of novel therapeutics for infectious disease, Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, and other human diseases. Previously, Dr. Goldblatt was director of defense sciences at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, where his responsibilities included creating foundational efforts to make biology a strength for the Department of Defense. Dr. Goldblatt has spearheaded product development and corporate venture capital efforts and worked with a variety of regulatory and legal issues as science and technology officer for McDonald’s and other employers.


Anantha Krishnan (Co-chair), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Dr. Krishnan is director of research and development and section leader for meso-, micro-, and nanoscale technology at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Before his appointment there, Dr. Krishnan was a program manager with the Microsystems Technology Office of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, where he was responsible for managing programs that focused on developing advanced multidisciplinary design tools for mixed-technology integration in microsystems. Dr. Krishnan had held various positions, including vice-president for advanced technology, at Computational Fluid Dynamics Research Corporation, where he managed several projects in semiconductor processing technology, MEMS/bio-MEMS, mesoscale systems, conformal integrated electronics, supercritical fluid technology, crystal growth, and aerospace and rocket propulsion. His technical expertise includes fluid and plasma transport and heat and mass transfer and chemistry in chemical and biological systems. His efforts focused on the development of multidisciplinary analytic tools to simulate coupled interactions among fluidic, thermal, chemical, structural, and electromagnetic phenomena in complex engineering systems. Dr. Krishnan obtained his doctorate in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1989. He has more than 50 publications in international journals and conferences.


Nancy Connell, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey

Dr. Connell is an associate professor of microbiology and molecular genetics at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)-New Jersey Medical School. She is also director of the UMDNJ Center for BioDefense, which was established in 1999 and is the recipient of $11.5 million in congressional recommendations (2000-2004) for research into the detection and diagnosis of biological warfare agents and biodefense preparedness. Dr. Connell also is director of the Biosafety Level 3 Facility of UMDNJ’s Center for the Study of Emerging



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Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Michael J. Goldblatt (Co-chair), Functional Genetics Dr. Goldblatt is the chief executive officer of Functional Genetics, a biotechnology company engaged in the development of novel therapeutics for infectious disease, Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, and other human diseases. Previously, Dr. Goldblatt was director of defense sciences at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, where his responsibilities included creating foundational efforts to make biology a strength for the Department of Defense. Dr. Goldblatt has spearheaded product development and corporate venture capital efforts and worked with a variety of regulatory and legal issues as science and technology officer for McDonald’s and other employers. Anantha Krishnan (Co-chair), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dr. Krishnan is director of research and development and section leader for meso-, micro-, and nanoscale technology at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Before his appointment there, Dr. Krishnan was a program manager with the Microsystems Technology Office of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, where he was responsible for managing programs that focused on developing advanced multidisciplinary design tools for mixed-technology integration in microsystems. Dr. Krishnan had held various positions, including vice-president for advanced technology, at Computational Fluid Dynamics Research Corporation, where he managed several projects in semiconductor processing technology, MEMS/bio-MEMS, mesoscale systems, conformal integrated electronics, supercritical fluid technology, crystal growth, and aerospace and rocket propulsion. His technical expertise includes fluid and plasma transport and heat and mass transfer and chemistry in chemical and biological systems. His efforts focused on the development of multidisciplinary analytic tools to simulate coupled interactions among fluidic, thermal, chemical, structural, and electromagnetic phenomena in complex engineering systems. Dr. Krishnan obtained his doctorate in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1989. He has more than 50 publications in international journals and conferences. Nancy Connell, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Dr. Connell is an associate professor of microbiology and molecular genetics at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)-New Jersey Medical School. She is also director of the UMDNJ Center for BioDefense, which was established in 1999 and is the recipient of $11.5 million in congressional recommendations (2000-2004) for research into the detection and diagnosis of biological warfare agents and biodefense preparedness. Dr. Connell also is director of the Biosafety Level 3 Facility of UMDNJ’s Center for the Study of Emerging 15

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and Re-emerging Pathogens and chairs the Recombinant DNA Subcommittee of the university’s Institutional Biosafety Committee. She chairs the National Institutes of Health’s Center for Scientific Review Study Section BM-1, which reviews bacterial-pathogenesis submissions to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Dr. Connell’s involvement in biological weapons control began in 1984, when she was chair of the Committee on the Military Use of Biological Research, a subcommittee of the Council for Responsible Genetics, based in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Dr. Connell received her Ph.D. in microbiology from Harvard University. Her major research focus is the interaction between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the macrophage. Philip E. Coyle III, Science Strategies Mr. Coyle served as assistant secretary of defense and director of operational test and evaluation at the Department of Defense (DOD). In this capacity he was principal adviser to the secretary of defense and the under secretary of defense for acquisition, technology, and logistics of testing and evaluation. Mr. Coyle has 30 years of experience in testing and test-related matters. From 1959 to 1979 and 1981 to 1993, he worked at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California, where he served as an associate director. During the Carter administration, he served as principal deputy assistant secretary for defense programs in the Department of Energy, in which capacity he had oversight responsibility for the nuclear-weapons testing programs of the department. The International Test and Evaluation Association awarded Mr. Coyle the Allan R. Matthews Award, its highest award, for his contributions to the management and technology of testing and evaluation. Mr. Coyle was awarded the Defense Distinguished Service Medal by DOD Secretary Perry and the Bronze Palm of the Defense Distinguished Service Medal by DOD Secretary Cohen. Mr. Coyle received a B.A. and an M.S. in mechanical engineering from Dartmouth University. Eric Eisenstadt, J. Craig Venter Institute Dr. Eisenstadt is deputy vice-president for research at the J. Craig Venter Institute. Dr. Eisenstadt, whose background is in microbial physiology and genetics, has cultivated interdisciplinary programs in biotechnology for the past 17 years at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Defense Sciences Office and the Office of Naval Research Biological Science and Technology Division. As a program manager at DARPA and ONR, Dr. Eisenstadt developed and managed diverse research in which interdisciplinary teams analyzed single-cell gene regulatory networks, sequenced biological warfare microbes, created computational tools for the de novo design of novel proteins, and explored biofabrication’s potential in high- efficiency solar cells. He was the Navy’s technical representative to the joint services program for basic and applied research programs in chemical and biologicalwarfare defense. Dr. Eisenstadt received his Ph.D. in biology from Washington University. Eric E. Gard, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dr. Gard, a chemist, leads the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s Defense Biology Division, where he has worked for the past six years to develop a system that can detect airborne pathogens and sound a warning in less than a minute. He and his team have answered that challenge by developing the Bioaerosol Mass Spectrometry system, which won a 2005 research and development 100 award as one of the year’s most promising technologies and is now available for licensing. Dr. Gard received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Davis. 16

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Michael J. Hopmeier, Unconventional Concepts, Inc. Mr. Hopmeier is the chief of innovative and unconventional concepts at Unconventional Concepts, Inc., an engineering and scientific consulting firm that provides research, organization, and technology-integration services. He is a technical adviser and an operational consultant to numerous government agencies, including the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Defense Sciences Office, the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Infectious Diseases, and the office of the U.S. Air Force surgeon general. His project fields include chemical and biological incident response, combat casualty care and medical support, crisis response and management, unconventional pathogen countermeasure programs, federal agency protective measures, counterterrorism, and integrated federal-civilian disaster response. Mr. Hopmeier holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mechanical engineering from the University of Florida. Murray V. Johnston, University of Delaware Dr. Johnston is a professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Delaware. He began his academic career as an assistant professor of chemistry and a fellow of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He received a Center for Advanced Study fellowship in 1999, the Outstanding Scholar Award in the College of Arts and Sciences in 2001, and the Delaware Section Award of the American Chemical Society in 2003. Dr. Johnston’s research includes applications of mass spectrometry to a wide array of materials, from airborne particles to biological and polymeric macromolecules. Over the past 15 years he has used real-time single-particle mass spectrometry to study microchemical reactions within particles, heterogeneous reactions between gas-phase and particulate-phase species, and ambient particles at various urban sites. His current work emphasizes the use of photoionization aerosol mass spectrometry to characterize organic components of combustion and ambient aerosols, nanoparticle mass spectrometry to characterize individual particles and macromolecules 10 nm and smaller, and conventional mass spectrometry to characterize oligomers in secondary organic aerosols. His work has led to some 130 publications. Frances Ligler, Naval Research Laboratory (NAE) Dr. Ligler is the U.S. Navy’s senior scientist for biosensors and biomaterials and a member of the Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). She earned a D.Phil. and a D.Sc. from Oxford University; has published two books and over 220 articles in scientific journals, which have been cited over 3,000 times; and has 19 issued patents. Before joining NRL in 1985, she performed basic and clinical research in immunology in academe and industry. She is a winner of the Christopher Columbus Homeland Security Award, the Navy Merit Award and Superior Civilian Service Medal, the National Drug Control Policy Technology Transfer Award, the American Chemical Society Hillebrand Award, the NRL technology transfer award, three NRL Edison awards for patent of the year, the Furman University Bell Tower Award, and the national Women in Science and Engineering Outstanding Achievement in Science Award. She chaired the 1994 Gordon Research Conference on Bio/Analytical Sensors and was elected a fellow of SPIE—The International Society for Optical Engineering. She is regional editor for North and South America for Biosensors & Bioelectronics and serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Biomedical Optics, Applied 17

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Biochemistry & Biotechnology, and Sensors Letters. In 2002 she was the American representative on the organizing committee for the International Biosensors Congress in Kyoto, Japan, and was elected to the permanent organizing committee of the European Conference on Optical Sensors (UK 2002, Spain 2004, Germany 2006). In 2003 she was awarded the presidential rank of Distinguished Career Professional. Shane D. Mayor, National Center for Atmospheric Research Dr. Mayor is a scientist at the Earth Observing Laboratory of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). Dr. Mayor received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. The Wisconsin lidar program has two major thrusts: volume-image lidar (VIL) and high-spectral-resolution lidar (HSRL). Dr. Mayor’s dissertation work focused on using VIL data to improve fine-scale numerical simulations of atmospheric boundary layer turbulence. After completing his Ph.D., Dr. Mayor worked at NCAR through the Advanced Studies Program and the Atmospheric Technology Division to develop Raman-shifted eye-safe aerosol lidar (REAL), an eye-safe version of the Wisconsin VIL. Through collaboration with ITT Industries, a hardened version of REAL now operate to protect buildings from bioaerosol attack. Dr. Mayor is now working on methods to marry the REAL and HSRL concepts so that future REALs can provide calibrated aerosol backscatter, depolarization ratio, and other quantities, such as vector winds from the scan data. Before going to Wisconsin, he worked at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration on differential absorption lidar and at NCAR on heterodyne Doppler lidar. Timothy F. Moshier, Syracuse Research Corporation Mr. Moshier is senior principal scientist at the Syracuse Research Corporation. He has over 25 years of experience in chemical and biological defense. He received a B.A. in biology from the State University of New York at Oswego in 1981, an M.S. in biology from Syracuse University in 1990, and a master’s degree in military art and science from the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College in 1994. In his 21 years of Army service, Mr. Moshier held a variety of positions with tactical and research, development, and acquisition (RD&A) organizations. Among his tactical assignments, Mr. Moshier served with the 5th Infantry Division (Mechanized), the 10th Mountain Division, and the 196th Field Artillery Brigade (during Operation Desert Storm). Mr. Moshier also served for six months with the United Nations Special Commission in 1995 investigating Iraq’s biological-weapons program. Among his RD&A assignments, Mr. Moshier served at the U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground (as installation biological safety officer and operations officer) and in the Joint Program Office for Biological Defense (as detection project officer and manager for the Critical Reagents Program). Mr. Moshier is a certified Acquisition Level III Professional. After retiring from the Army in 2002, he worked for SPARTA, Inc., as chief of the homeland security division, where he was responsible for the daily operation of an organization consisting of threat and international relations specialists; chemical, biological, and nuclear defense experts; and a group of explosive ordnance disposal experts. Mr. Moshier is a staff member of the Environmental Science Center at Syracuse Research Corporation. C. Shane Reese, Brigham Young University Dr. Reese is associate professor of statistics at Brigham Young University. He received his Ph.D. in statistics from Texas A&M University. He is associate editor of the Journal of the 18

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American Statistical Association. He also serves as vice chair of the association Committee on Federally Funded Research and as a member of the ASA Committee on Science and Public Affairs. He has also served as president of the Albuquerque Chapter of the association (2000- 2001). At Brigham Young he is a member of the university awards committee and chairs the Search Committee and the Computer Committee. Dr. Reese’s research interests include Bayesian hierarchical models, Bayesian optimal experimental design, and sports statistics. Upendra N. Singh, National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dr. Singh is chief technologist at the Systems Engineering Directorate at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center. Before joining NASA Langley, he was chief scientist for Hughes STX Corporation. Dr. Singh is principal investigator and coinvestigator of NASA’s lidar risk reduction program and laser-lidar technologies for explorations project. He designed and developed two state-of-the-art lidar systems: NASA’s first mobile stratospheric Rayleigh-Raman ozone lidar system for monitoring ozone depletion and a mobile aerosol and temperature lidar system with three primary wavelengths (1064, 532, and 351 nm) and one secondary wavelength (382 nm) for stratospheric aerosol measurements. Dr. Singh coordinated the Integrated NASA Lidar System Strategy Team. He also selected representatives from NASA Langley and the Goddard Space Flight Center for the team and formed alliances with other government agencies, industry, and academe. Through workshops and meetings, they assessed the status of laser technology, identified key technologies that needed development, and established a basis of future collaboration and partnership. He received the Exceptional Service Medal from NASA in June 2006. He has a B.S. in physics, an M.S. in applied physics, an M.Phil. in physics, a Diplôme d'Etude Approfondis, and a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Pierre and Marie Curie in Paris, France. 19

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