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Appendix 5-2
Detailed Tenure Information from Departmental Survey

 

Men

Women

Tenured

Not tenured

Total

Tenured

Not tenured

Total

Biology

89

16

105

29

5

34

Chemistry

79

22

101

11

0

11

Civil engineering

74

15

89

11

2

13

Electrical engineering

91

10

101

9

0

9

Mathematics

106

16

122

14

1

15

Physics

106

7

113

5

0

5

High-prestige institution

79

22

101

11

1

13

Medium-prestige institution

74

12

86

15

0

15

Low-prestige institution

392

52

444

60

7

67

Total

545

86

631

 

 

95

Public institution

425

54

479

62

5

67

Private institution

130

32

162

17

3

20

Total

555

86

641

 

 

81

Stop-the-tenure-clock policy

113

22

135

16

1

17

No stop-the-tenure-clock policy

417

60

477

60

6

66

Total

530

82

612

 

 

83

NOTES: There were 755 tenure decisions reported by 319 departments that reported having at least 1 tenure case during the 2 years of the study. In 631 of those tenure decisions, the candidate was a man. In 124 decisions, the candidate was a woman. We deleted 37 cases in which the candidate was a woman but the department reported having no female tenure-track faculty at the assistant or associate professor levels. Thus there are only 87 tenure decisions involving women. The column labeled Tenured shows the number of decisions that were positive, while the column labeled Not tenured shows the number of negative decisions. There were five decisions for which information about the stop-the-tenure-clock policy was missing that involved women and 19 decisions that involved men.

SOURCE: Departmental surveys conducted by the Committee on Gender Differences in Careers of Science, Engineering, and Mathematics Faculty.



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Appendix 5-2 Detailed Tenure Information from Departmental Survey Men Women Tenured Not tenured Total Tenured Not tenured Total Biology 89 16 105 29 5 34 Chemistry 79 22 101 11 0 11 Civil engineering 74 15 89 11 2 13 Electrical engineering 91 10 101 9 0 9 Mathematics 106 16 122 14 1 15 Physics 106 7 113 5 0 5 High-prestige institution 79 22 101 11 1 13 Medium-prestige institution 74 12 86 15 0 15 Low-prestige institution 392 52 444 60 7 67 Total 545 86 631 95 Public institution 425 54 479 62 5 67 Private institution 130 32 162 17 3 20 Total 555 86 641 81 Stop-the-tenure-clock policy 113 22 135 16 1 17 No stop-the-tenure-clock policy 417 60 477 60 6 66 Total 530 82 612 83 NOTES: There were 755 tenure decisions reported by 319 departments that reported having at least 1 tenure case during the 2 years of the study. In 631 of those tenure decisions, the candidate was a man. In 124 decisions, the candidate was a woman. We deleted 37 cases in which the candidate was a woman but the department reported having no female tenure-track faculty at the assistant or associate professor levels. Thus there are only 87 tenure decisions involving women. The column labeled Tenured shows the number of decisions that were positive, while the column labeled Not tenured shows the number of negative decisions. There were five decisions for which information about the stop-the-tenure-clock policy was missing that involved women and 19 decisions that involved men. SOURCE: Departmental surveys conducted by the Committee on Gender Differences in Careers of Science, Engineering, and Mathematics Faculty.