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Bibliography

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Bibliography Ahern, N., and E. Scott. 1981. Career Outcomes in a Matched Sample of Men and Women Ph.D.s. Washington, DC: National Research Council. Allen, T. D., L. T. Eby, S. S. Douthitt, and C. L. Noble. 2002. Applicant gender and fam- ily structure: Effects on perceived relocation commitment and spouse resistance. Sex Roles 47(11/12):543-552. Allison, P. 1984. Event History Analysis: Regression for Longitudinal Event Data. Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications. Alvarez, R. M., and Brehm, J. 1995. American ambivalence towards abortion policy: Development of a heteroskedatic probit model of competing values. American Journal of Political Science (39):1055-1089. Amato, I. 1992. Profile of a field: Chemistry. Science 255(5050):1372-1373. American Association of University Professors (AAUP). 2003. Contingent appointments and the academic profession. Academe 89(5):59-69. American College of Physicians. 1991. Promotion and tenure of women and minorities on medical school faculties. Annals of Internal Medicine 114(1):63-68. Amey, M. J. 1996. The institutional marketplace and faculty attrition. Thought & Action: The NEA Higher Education Journal 12:23-35. Andersen, K., and E. D. Miller. 1997. Gender and student evaluations of teaching. PS: Political Sci- ence and Politics 30(2):216-219. Anderson, E. 2002. The New Professoriate: Characteristics, Contributions, and Compensation. Washington, DC: American Council on Education. Antonio, A. 2003. Diverse student bodies, diverse faculties. Academe 89(6):14-17. Aper, J., and J. Fry. 2003. Post-tenure review at graduate institutions in the United States. The Journal of Higher Education 74(3):241-260. Ash, A. S., P. L. Carr, R. Goldstein, and R. H. Friedman. 2004. Compensation and advancement of women in academic medicine: Is there equity? Annals of Internal Medicine 141(3):205-212. Ashenfelter, O., and D. Card. 2002. Did the elimination of mandatory retirement affect faculty retire- ment flows? American Economic Review 92(4):957-980. 0

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