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TABLE 3-7 Percent of Candidates of Each Gender Who Received the First Offer and Gender of Candidates Who Eventually Accepted Each Tenure-Track Position

Position Was Offered to

Person Hired Was a

Female

Male

Female

70 (107)

30 (46)

Male

5 (19)

95 (362)

NOTES: Number of cases is given in parentheses.

Table 3-7 is based on the subset of the positions used to construct Table 3-6 for which the gender of the person who accepted the position was known. We do not know from these data whether the person who accepted the position is the same person who received the first offer, even in those cases in which the gender is the same.

SOURCE: Survey of departments carried out by the Committee on Gender Differences in Careers of Science, Engineering, and Mathematics Faculty.

TABLE 3-8 First Offer and Person Hired for Tenured Position, Percent by Gender

Position Was Offered to

Person Hired Was a

Female

Male

Female

77 (20)

23 (6)

Male

0 (0)

100 (67)

NOTES: Number of cases is given in parentheses.

Table 3-8 is based on the subset of the positions used to construct Table 3-6 for which the gender of the person who accepted the position was known. We do not know from these data whether the person who accepted the position is the same person who received the first offer, even in those cases in which the gender is the same. Number of cases is given in parentheses.

SOURCE: Survey of departments carried out by the Committee on Gender Differences in Careers of Science, Engineering, and Mathematics Faculty.

We do not have information in our survey data to permit investigating this difference further. One plausible explanation is that many women who are offered positions are the only woman interviewed for that position. If the only woman interviewed is offered the position and turns it down (for whatever reason), that position will inevitably be filled by a man. In fact, only one woman was interviewed for 205 (38 percent) of the tenure-track and 23 (24 percent) of the tenured openings for which more than one person was interviewed. While there are many reasons why a person might turn down a job offer, in this particular instance, it is possible women, who are interviewed at disproportionally higher rates, also receive more offers than men and have to turn some of them down.



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