Appendix B
Committee Member Biographies

RITA R. COLWELL, Committee Chair, is Chairman of Canon US Life Sciences, Inc. and Distinguished University Professor both at the University of Maryland at College Park and at Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her interests are focused on global infectious diseases, water, and health, and she is currently developing an international network to address emerging infectious diseases and water issues, including safe drinking water for both the developed and developing world. Dr. Colwell served as the 11th Director of the National Science Foundation (NSF), 1998-2004. In her capacity as NSF Director, she served as Co-chair of the Committee on Science of the National Science and Technology Council. Her major interests include K-12 science and mathematics education, graduate science and engineering education, and the increased participation of women and minorities in science and engineering. Dr. Colwell has held many advisory positions in the U.S. government, nonprofit science policy organizations, and private foundations, as well as in the international scientific research community. She is a nationally respected scientist and educator, and has authored or co-authored 16 books and more than 700 scientific publications. She produced the award-winning film, Invisible Seas, and has served on editorial boards of numerous scientific journals. Before going to NSF, Dr. Colwell was President of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute and Professor of Microbiology and Biotechnology at the University of Maryland. She was also a member of the National Science Board from 1984 to 1990. Dr. Colwell has previously served as Chairman of the Board of Governors



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Appendix B Committee Member Biographies RITA R. COLWELL, Committee Chair, is Chairman of Canon US Life Sciences, Inc. and Distinguished University Professor both at the Uni- versity of Maryland at College Park and at Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her interests are focused on global infectious diseases, water, and health, and she is currently developing an international network to address emerging infectious diseases and water issues, including safe drinking water for both the developed and developing world. Dr. Colwell served as the 11th Director of the National Science Foundation (NSF), 1998-2004. In her capacity as NSF Director, she served as Co-chair of the Committee on Science of the National Science and Technology Council. Her major interests include K-12 science and mathematics education, graduate science and engineering education, and the increased participation of women and minorities in science and engi- neering. Dr. Colwell has held many advisory positions in the U.S. govern- ment, nonprofit science policy organizations, and private foundations, as well as in the international scientific research community. She is a nation- ally respected scientist and educator, and has authored or co-authored 16 books and more than 700 scientific publications. She produced the award-winning film, Invisible Seas, and has served on editorial boards of numerous scientific journals. Before going to NSF, Dr. Colwell was President of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute and Pro- fessor of Microbiology and Biotechnology at the University of Maryland. She was also a member of the National Science Board from 1984 to 1990. Dr. Colwell has previously served as Chairman of the Board of Governors 

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 SCIENCE PROFESSIONALS of the American Academy of Microbiology and also as President of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the Wash- ington Academy of Sciences, the American Society for Microbiology, the Sigma xi National Science Honorary Society, and the International Union of Microbiological Societies. Dr. Colwell is a 2006 National Medal of Sci- ence laureate and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. She has also been awarded 40 honorary degrees from institutions of higher education, including her Alma Mater, Purdue University. Dr. Colwell holds a B.S. in Bacteriology and an M.S. in Genetics from Purdue University, and a Ph.D. in Oceanography from the University of Washington. DAVID S. CHAPMAN is professor of Geology & Geophysics and Dean of the Graduate School at the University of Utah. At Utah, Dr. Chapman has been a faculty member, department chair, Associate Dean of the Graduate School and now dean of the Graduate School and Associate Vice President for graduate studies. As graduate dean, Chapman implemented a tuition benefit for 2,000 graduate students, created a health insurance benefit for teaching and research assistants, and expanded training for international teaching assistants. In 2006, he was honored with the Rosenblatt Prize for Excellence, the University of Utah’s most prestigious award. He has authored more than 120 publications, leads a research group studying thermal aspects of geological processes, and is immediate past chairman of the International Heat Flow Committee. In 2001, Chapman was elected to the Board of the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS), and in 2002, he was elected president of the Western Association of Graduate Schools. He has previously served on the U.S. National Committee for the Inter- national Union of Geodesy and Geophysics. Dr. Chapman received his B.S. in physics and mathematics in 1964 and his master’s in physics in 1966 from the University of British Columbia. He received his Ph.D. in Geophysics from the University of Michigan. JUNG CHOI is Associate Chair for the School of Biology, Associate Profes- sor of Molecular Genetics, and Faculty Coordinator of the Bioinformat- ics Masters Degree Program at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His research focuses on plant molecular genetics and plant protein kinases. Dr. Choi has received numerous research grants as well as the honor of being a Lilly Endowment Teaching Fellow (1990-1991). He is a member of the AAAS and the Professional Science Masters Advisory Board for the CGS among other groups. Dr. Choi has his Ph.D. in Biology from the University of California San Diego (1983).

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 APPENDIX B DARyL CHUBIN is the Director of the Center for Advancing Science and Engineering Capacity at the AAAS. He became Director in August 2004. Previously, he served as Senior Vice President for Research, Policy & Programs at the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering (NACME) Inc. In addition, he spent nearly 15 years in federal service. His posts included Senior Policy Officer for the National Science Board at the NSF (1998-2001); Division Director for Research, Evaluation and Commu- nication in NSF’s Directorate for Education and Human Resources (1993- 1998); and (on detail) Assistant Director for Social and Behavioral Sciences (and Education) at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (1997). Dr. Chubin has served on the faculty of four universities, including Georgia Tech, where he was promoted to full professor. He has published eight books and numerous reports on issues in science policy, human resource development, program evaluation, and engineering edu- cation. Among Dr. Chubin’s honors are: AAAS Fellow, Past Chair of the AAAS section on Societal Impacts of Science and Engineering, Fellow of the Association for Women in Science, member of the National Academy of Engineering Committee on Diversity in the Engineering Workforce (as well as four other NRC committees), Integrator for BEST (Building Engineering and Science Talent), and co-recipient of the American Society of Engineering Education Wickenden Award for best paper published in the 2003 volume of The Journal of Engineering Education, Quality Education for Minorities/MSE 2006 Giant of Science, and Sigma xi Distinguished Lecturer 2007-2009. Dr. Chubin earned his Ph.D. in sociology from Loyola University (Chicago) in 1973. MARy E. CLUTTER is the former assistant director of the NSF where she was responsible for the Biological Sciences Directorate. Dr. Clutter has also served as the U.S. Chair of the U.S.-European Commission Task Force on Biotechnology and has been a member of the Board of Trustees of the International Human Frontiers Science Program, the Board of Regents of the National Library of Medicine, and the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education and Economics Advisory Board. She served as chair of the Biotechnology Subcommittee of the Committee on Science of the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC), co-chair of the Subcommittee on Ecological Systems of the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources/NSTC and co-chair of the NSTC Committee on Science’s Interagency Working Group on Plant Genomes. Dr. Clutter is a member of numerous professional societies and has served on the Board of Directors of the AAAS. She is a Fellow of the AAAS as well as of the Association for Women in Science. She is currently a member of the NRC’s Policy and Global Affairs Committee. Dr. Clutter received her B.S. in

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8 SCIENCE PROFESSIONALS biology from Allegheny College and her master’s and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Pittsburgh. PAUL G. GAFFNEy II became the seventh president of Monmouth Uni- versity in July 2003. President Gaffney, a retired Navy Vice Admiral, was president of the National Defense University from 2000 to 2003. Prior to that, he was the Chief of Naval Research with responsibility for science and technology investment, a substantial part of which supported basic research in American universities. He was appointed by President George W. Bush to the Ocean Policy Commission in July 2001, and served dur- ing its full tenure from 2001 to 2004. His naval career spanned over three decades including duty at sea, overseas, and ashore in executive and com- mand positions. While a military officer, his career focused on oceanogra- phy, research administration, and education. President Gaffney is a 1968 graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy. Upon graduation, he was selected for immediate graduate education and received a master’s degree in Ocean Engineering from Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. He completed a year as a student and advanced research fellow at the Naval War College, graduating with highest distinction. He completed an M.B.A. at Jacksonville University. The University of South Carolina, Jacksonville University, and Catholic University have awarded him honorary doctor- ates. He has been recognized with a number of military decorations, the Naval War College’s J. William Middendorf Prize for Strategic Research, the Outstanding Public Service Award from the Virginia Research and Technology Consortium, and the Potomac Institute’s Navigator Award. He is a fellow of the American Meteorological Society, has served on several boards of higher education, and was a member of the Ocean Studies Board of the National Research Council during 2002-2004. He has been selected to be a Public Trustee for the New Jersey Marine Sciences Consortium and chaired the Governor’s Commission to Protect and Enhance New Jersey’s Military Bases, and serves on the Meridian Health Board of Trustees. LEE L. HUNTSMAN is President Emeritus at the University of Washing- ton (UW) and a Professor in the Department of Bioengineering. Before serving as President, he was UW’s provost and vice president for aca- demic affairs. His research interests are the mechanics of heart and heart muscle, cardiovascular system assessment, and new measurement tech- niques. In 2005, Dr. Huntsman was named executive director of the Life Sciences Discovery Fund Authority. Approved by the Washington state legislature, the fund uses tobacco settlement money to “help finance groundbreaking research and development of biomedical and other scien- tific advances.” Dr. Huntsman is a fellow of the AAAS and the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering. From 2004 to 2005, he

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 APPENDIX B served as a committee member on the “Committee To Assess the Capacity of the U.S. Engineering Research Enterprise” for the National Academy of Engineering. He received his Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from the University of Pennsylvania in 1968. JONATHAN M. KAyES is a 24-year veteran of the Central Intelligence Agency. He has served as the CIA’s Chief Learning Officer since April 2006 and ran one of the CIA’s training centers from 2001 to 2004. He has spent the majority of his career in the Clandestine Service, splitting his assignments between the field and jobs at CIA HQS. While much of his work has focused on East Asia, he has also covered weapons pro- liferation, telecommunications, and terrorism. Mr. Kayes is a native of St. Louis where he attended the John Burroughs School. He graduated from Columbia University with a B.A. in political science. He also did master’s work at the Columbia School of International Affairs. Among other awards, CIA has awarded Mr. Kayes the Intelligence Commenda- tion Medal and the Donovan Award. DONALD N. LANGENBERG is Chancellor Emeritus of the 13-mem- ber University System of Maryland, having served as its head from 1990 to 2002. In 1983, Dr. Langenberg became Chancellor of the Uni- versity of Illinois at Chicago where he was also a professor of physics. Dr. Langenberg has received countless honors and awards, and was named Deputy Director of the NSF by President Jimmy Carter in 1980. He was awarded the John Price Wetherill Medal of the Franklin Institute, the Distinguished Contribution to Research Administration Award of the Society of Research Administrators, and many others. Dr. Langenberg’s research has been primarily in experimental condensed matter physics and materials science. His work in this field of superconductivity led to a new type of voltage standard now in use worldwide. Dr. Langenberg serves or has served on many boards including the Board of Directors of the AAAS, of which he was Chairman; the Board of Directors of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation; the Board of Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania; and the Executive Board of the National Association of the State Universities and Land Grant Colleges, of which he was Chairman. He was President of the American Physical Society, is Vice-Chairman of the board of the National Council for Science and the Environment, chairs the board of the Education Trust, Inc., and chairs the Professional Science Masters Advisory Board for the Council of Graduate Schools. In addition, Dr. Langenberg is currently a member of the Board of Trustees of the University of the District of Columbia, as well as a member of the NRC Committee on Teacher Preparation Programs in the U.S. Dr. Langenberg earned his B.S. at Iowa State University, his M.S. at the University of

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80 SCIENCE PROFESSIONALS California, Los Angeles, and his Ph.D. at the University of California, Berkeley. All of his degrees are in physics. GEORGE LANGFORD is Dean of the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Before arriving at Amherst, Dr. Langford was the Ernest Everett Just Professor of Natural Sciences and professor of biological sciences at Dartmouth College in New Hampshire and an adjunct professor of physiology at the Dartmouth Medical Center from 1991 until 2005. He has numerous publications and his current laboratory work focuses on the neuronal cytoskeleton and the role actin plays in learning and memory. Dr. Langford was previously a National Institutes of Health (NIH) postdoctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania (1971-1973), an assistant professor of biology at the Uni- versity of Massachusetts Boston (1973-1976), Josiah Macy Scholar at the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, Massachusetts (1976), assis- tant professor of anatomy at the Howard University College of Medicine (1977-1979), and associate professor (1979-88) and professor (1988-1991) of physiology in the School of Medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Langford has been an NIH grantee (1978-1986) and program director for the NSF’s cell biology program (1988-1989). From 1998 to 2004, he served on the National Science Board. He has served on several NRC committees and currently is a member of NRC’s Asso- ciateship and Fellowship Programs Advisory Committee. Dr. Langford received his Ph.D. in cell biology from the Illinois Institute of Technology and was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania. HENRy RIGGS became founding President of the Keck Graduate Institute of Applied Life Sciences in March 1997 following nine years as President and Professor of Engineering of Harvey Mudd College. Both of these insti- tutions are members of the Claremont Colleges Consortium. He retired as president on July 15, 2003. Earlier, he was Stanford’s Vice President for Development, heading all university fundraising activities, and remains the Thomas Ford Professor of Engineering Management, Emeritus. Pro- fessor Riggs has specialized in engineering management with a focus on industrial finance and control, managing technical companies, and new enterprise management. He taught control and management courses at Stanford’s School of Engineering and a course in the management of technology jointly with the Graduate School of Business. His commit- ment to teaching is evidenced by his receipt of the Tau Beta Pi Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Engineering Teaching in 1979 and the Walter J. Gores Faculty Achievement Award in 1980. He has a B.S. degree from Stanford and an MBA degree from Harvard and honorary doctoral degrees from Harvey Mudd College (2006) and Keck Graduate Institute

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8 APPENDIX B (2007). He has held business positions with Ampex (1957-1958), Stanford Research Institute (1960-1963), Icore Industries (1963-1970), and Measurex (1970-1974). From 1965 to 1970, he was president of Icore; from 1970 to 1974, he was vice president of finance at Measurex. He taught at Stanford from 1970 to 1988 and was chairman of the Department of Industrial Engi- neering and Engineering Management from 1978 to 1982. He is currently a director of several companies and the author of several books. JIM SPOHRER is the Director of Almaden Services Research, with the mission of creating and deploying service innovations that matter and scale well both internally to transform IBM and externally to transform IBM client capabilities (“double win” service innovations). Service system innovation is a multidisciplinary endeavor, integrating technology, busi- ness model, social-organizational, and demand innovations (just think about the ubiquity of credit cards, and what it took to make that service system innovation global; also, too often, people focus on the invention of the light bulb, and forget about the service system innovations required to make that point technology innovation beneficial to so many). Prior to joining IBM, Spohrer was at Apple Computer, attaining the role of Distin- guished Scientist, Engineer, and Technologist for his pioneering work on intelligent multimedia learning systems, next generation authoring tools, on-line learning communities, and augmented reality learning systems. He has published in the areas of speech recognition, artificial intelligence, empirical studies of programmers, next generation learning systems, and service science. Spohrer graduated with a Ph.D. in computer science from yale University (specializing in artificial intelligence and cognitive sci- ence) in 1989 and a B.S. in physics from MIT in 1978. RICHARD TAPIA [NAE] is University Professor, Maxfield-Oshman Pro- fessor in Engineering, Director of the Center for Excellence and Equity in Education, and Associate Director of Graduate Studies at Rice University. A mathematician and professor in the Department of Computational and Applied Mathematics at Rice, Dr. Tapia is known for both his research and leadership in education and outreach programs. At Rice, Dr. Tapia directs the institution’s NSF-funded Alliance for Graduate Education in the Pro- fessoriate program which provides opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students in science, mathematics, and engineering to participate in university activities and work for the summer under the guidance of researchers at Rice. Due to his efforts, Rice has received national recogni- tion for its educational outreach programs and the Rice Computational and Applied Mathematics Department has become a national leader in producing women and underrepresented minority Ph.D. recipients in the mathematical sciences. Dr. Tapia is the recipient of the Society for

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8 SCIENCE PROFESSIONALS Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) Prize for Distinguished Ser- vice to the Profession, the American Mathematical Society Distinguished Public Service Award, NACME’s Reginald H. Jones Distinguished Service Award, the SACNAS Distinguished Scientist Award, the Lifetime Mentor Award from the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the 1996 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring. Dr. Tapia has also been named Hispanic Engineer of the year by Hispanic Engineer Magazine and was awarded the inaugural A. Nico Habermann Award by the Computer Research Association in 1994. Dr. Tapia has previously served on the National Science Board. He has been a member of the National Academy of Engi- neering since 1992 and served as chair of the NRC’s Board on Higher Education and Workforce from 2001 to 2004. He received his B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees in mathematics from the University of California-Los Angeles. THOMAS R. TRITTON served as Haverford College’s twelfth president and was a cancer chemotherapy research expert whose work was con- tinuously funded by the American Cancer Society and the NIH. He is currently the President-in-Residence at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and will become president of the Chemical Heritage Foun- dation in 2008. A past deputy director of the Vermont Comprehensive Cancer Center—a Designated Center of the National Cancer Institute— Tritton is a member of the American Association for Cancer Research and the American Society of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Biology. In 1987 he co-chaired the first international symposium on organ-directed toxicities of cancer drugs, and the following year he chaired the Gordon Research Conference on cancer chemotherapy, an annual meeting of 135 prominent cancer specialists. Tritton has also served on the American Association of Cancer Research Program Committee and the board of directors of the Vermont Technology Council. From 1973 to 1975 he was a postdoctoral fellow in yale’s Chemistry Department. For the next 10 years he was an assistant and associate professor of pharmacology at yale until joining the pharmacology faculty at the University of Vermont in 1985. As vice provost at the University of Vermont from 1991 to 1997, Tritton was the senior research officer there, directing all aspects of sponsored programs, facilities, research funding, outreach, technology, and research policy for the university. In that position he also oversaw all computing and information technology, as well as university arts programs, includ- ing the Fleming Museum, the largest fine arts museum in Vermont. PHILIP TUCHINSKy is an applied mathematician, recently retired from a 28-year career at Ford Motor Company Research & Advanced Engi-

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8 APPENDIX B neering. In the final decade of his varied career, Tuchinsky helped cre- ate Ford’s first data mining group within a larger business intelligence (BI) effort (which Ford calls systems analytics). This BI organization, today about twenty strong, functions as a consulting group that conducts research for company operations (its customers). The BI practice proved very successful and grew steadily over the decade. It has gained a reputa- tion that extends to very senior executives and throughout industry. As a data miner, Tuchinsky developed a specialty in innovative warranty analysis. He has also worked with SIAM and several Michigan universi- ties to encourage the growth of these technologies by creating conferences and other events. Highlights of his Ford career include Henry Ford Tech- nology Awards in 1985 and 2000. His career record includes hundreds of internal and external publications and presentations. Tuchinsky’s retire- ment interests include consulting as the owner of Tuchinsky BI, LLC. Since 2002, masters-level education in the sciences has been an important personal and professional interest. He serves as an industrial advisor to the professional sciences masters (PSM) degree program in Industrial Mathematics at Michigan State University. He has spoken by invitation about the business significance of PSM degrees and the value of hiring PSM graduates in many forums. Tuchinsky serves on the Advisory Board of the Council of Graduate Schools PSM program. He is also participat- ing in the development of a pioneering PSM program at the University of Michigan: an M.S. in Applied Complex Systems. Dr. Tuchinsky won a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship for graduate study as he completed a math- ematics major at Queens College, CUNy in 1966. He completed his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New york University, in 1968 and 1971.

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