Appendix A
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Paul G. Kaminski, Chair, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, is chairman of the board and chief executive officer of Technovation, Inc., a consulting company dedicated to fostering innovation and the development and application of advanced technology. Dr. Kaminski is also a senior partner in Global Technology Partners, LLC. He is a former Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Technology, and served as an Air Force officer, directing the Low Observable (“Stealth”) Program and the development of advanced National Reconnaissance Space Systems. His professional activities include serving on the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) Technical Advisory Board, the FBI Director’s Advisory Board, and the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence Technical Advisory Board. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers as well as of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and is a director of the Atlantic Council. He has authored numerous publications dealing with inertial and terminal guidance system performance, simulation techniques, Kalman filtering, and numerical techniques applied to estimation problems. Dr. Kaminski received a Ph.D. in aeronautics and astronautics from Stanford University, M.S. degrees in aeronautics and astronautics and in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and a B.S. from the Air Force Academy.


Lester L. Lyles, Vice Chair, retired from the Air Force Materiel Command, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, as commander. He entered the Air Force in 1968 as a distinguished graduate of the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps Program. During his career in the United States Air Force, he has served in various assignments, including those as program element monitor of the short-



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Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Paul g. kaminski, Chair, a member of the National Academy of Engineer- ing, is chairman of the board and chief executive officer of Technovation, Inc., a consulting company dedicated to fostering innovation and the development and application of advanced technology. Dr. Kaminski is also a senior partner in Global Technology Partners, LLC. He is a former Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Technology, and served as an Air Force officer, directing the Low Observable (“Stealth”) Program and the development of advanced National Reconnaissance Space Systems. His professional activities include serving on the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) Technical Advisory Board, the FBI Director’s Advisory Board, and the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence Technical Advisory Board. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers as well as of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and is a director of the Atlantic Council. He has authored numerous publications dealing with inertial and terminal guidance system performance, simulation techniques, Kalman filtering, and numerical techniques applied to esti- mation problems. Dr. Kaminski received a Ph.D. in aeronautics and astronautics from Stanford University, M.S. degrees in aeronautics and astronautics and in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and a B.S. from the Air Force Academy. Lester L. Lyles, Vice Chair, retired from the Air Force Materiel Command, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, as commander. He entered the Air Force in 1968 as a distinguished graduate of the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps Program. During his career in the United States Air Force, he has served in various assignments, including those as program element monitor of the short- 

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 pre-MILeSTONe a aND earLY-pHaSe SYSTeMS eNGINeerING range attack missile at USAF Headquarters, special assistant and aide-de-camp to the commander of Air Force Systems Command, Avionics Division chief in the F-16 Systems Program Office, director of Tactical Aircraft Systems at Air Force Systems Command (AFSC) Headquarters, and as director of the Medium-Launch Vehicles program and Space-Launch Systems offices. General Lyles became AFSC Headquarters assistant deputy chief of staff for requirements in 1989 and deputy chief of staff for requirements in 1990. In 1992, he became vice com- mander of Ogden Air Logistics Center, Hill Air Force Base, Utah. He served as commander of the center until 1994, after which he was assigned to command the Space and Missile Systems Center at Los Angeles Air Force Base, California, until 1996. General Lyles became the director of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization in 1996. In May 1999, he was assigned as vice chief of staff at USAF Headquarters. General Lyles received an M.S. degree in mechanical and nuclear engineering from New Mexico State University and a B.S. in mechanical engineering from Howard University. Dev A. Banerjee serves as senior director and functional leader of systems engi- neering in the Integrated Defense Systems organization of the Boeing Company. As director of systems engineering at IDS, he has functional responsibility for the systems engineering disciplines of systems engineering measurement and control; affordability; system modeling and simulation; system integration, veri- fication and validation; human system integration; operations/systems analysis; reliability, maintainability, and systems health; systems safety; systems security; systems architecture and definition; and certification/qualification. Dr. Banerjee chairs the Systems Engineering/Concept Definition Sub-Council in integrating engineering resources in systems engineering and flight engineering disciplines across Boeing. He serves as the IDS engineering focal point for the Boeing Intel- lectual Property Council and as the IDS engineering focal point for managing an integrated engineering and supplier management plan for improved supplier performance. Dr. Banerjee holds a D.Sc. from Washington University in St. Louis in mechanical/aerospace engineering. Thomas W. Blakely is vice president of engineering for Lockheed Martin Aero- nautics Company. Since his appointment in June 2003, Mr. Blakely has led the engineering organization, which includes almost 8,700 engineers, scientists, and technicians engaged in delivering technical solutions for high-performance military aircraft and systems. Mr. Blakely graduated from Texas A&M Univer- sity in 1979 with a B.S. degree in aerospace engineering and directly joined the former Lockheed-California Company in Burbank. He was assigned to the Maritime Patrol and Anti-submarine Warfare business group and was involved with a variety of development programs related to the P-3 Orion and CP-140 Aurora aircraft. In 1984, he was assigned to Lockheed’s office in Arlington, Va.,

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 appeNDIX a to represent the Patrol Aircraft Engineering Division at the Naval Air Systems Command. He returned to Burbank, Calif., in 1986 and was promoted to engi- neering program manager for P-3C Orion programs. In 1988, he was reassigned to lead the preliminary design and EMD team responsible for the development of aircraft subsystems for the P-7 maritime patrol aircraft. In 1990, he returned to the Washington, D.C., area for a second tour in the company’s Arlington, Va., office, again working with the Maritime Patrol Engineering office at the Naval Air Systems Command. In 1991, Mr. Blakely transferred to Lockheed Aeronautics in Marietta, Ga., assuming responsibility for all of the company’s International Maritime Patrol Aircraft Engineering programs. In 1996, he was selected to lead the C-130J systems verification and flight test team and played a significant technical leadership role in civil certification of the new 382J and development and testing of the C-130J military configuration. He was subsequently promoted to chief systems engineer and, ultimately, chief engineer for C-130 programs. In August 2000, Mr. Blakely was promoted to the position of vice president as the deputy for engineering for Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company. In this role, he was involved with the consolidation of engineering operations, personnel, processes, and tools at the new company’s three sites into a single organization. The next few years also included several special technical leadership assignments on both the C-130J Program and the C-5 Avionics Modernization Program. He was selected as Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company vice president for engi- neering in the spring of 2003. In January 2004, he joined the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) executive leadership team on special assignment as the technical director for the JSF Development Program. While he was on this assignment, the program plan and strategy were restructured, and the preliminary design configuration and arrangement of the aircraft went through a substantial design iteration to reduce weight and improve operational suitability. Mr. Blakely received a B.S. in aero- space engineering from Texas A&M University. Natalie W. Crawford, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, is a senior fellow at the RAND Corporation. Immediately prior to this position, from 1997 to 2006, she held the position of vice president of the RAND Corporation and director of Project AIR FORCE (PAF). It was her responsibility to ensure that the research agenda of PAF addressed problems of greatest enduring importance to the Air Force, and that the research was of the highest possible quality and responsiveness. She has worked at the RAND Corporation for more than 40 years and has deep, substantive technical and operational knowledge and experience in areas such as conventional weapons, attack and surveillance avionics, fighter and bomber aircraft performance, aircraft survivability, electronic combat, theater missile defense, force modernization, space systems and capabilities, and non- kinetic operations. She has been a member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board since 1988, and served as its vice chair in 1990 and its co-chair from 1996

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 pre-MILeSTONe a aND earLY-pHaSe SYSTeMS eNGINeerING to 1999. She has served on numerous advisory committees. Mrs. Crawford has a B.S. in mathematics from the University of California at Los Angeles where she also pursued graduate study in applied mathematics and engineering. Stephen E. Cross is a vice president of the Georgia Institute of Technology and the director of the Georgia Tech Research Institute. He also holds faculty appoint- ments as a professor in industrial and systems engineering and as a professor in computer science. Before joining Georgia Tech in 2003, he was the director and chief executive officer of the Software Engineering Institute, a Department of Defense-sponsored federally funded research and development center at Carnegie Mellon University. Dr. Cross was a member of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Defense Software in 2000. He currently serves on the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Panel for Information Science and Technology. Dr. Cross is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. A retired Air Force officer, he attended the Air Force Test Pilot School (Flight Test Engineer Course) and served in various research and development assignments as a software engineer for the F-16, F-15, and B-1A programs; a flight test engineer in the Air Launched Cruise Missile program; an assistant professor at the Air Force Institute of Technology; a research manager at Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories; and a program manager at DARPA. Dr. Cross received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign, his M.S. in electrical engineering from the Air Force Institute of Tech- nology, and his B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Cincinnati. gilbert F. Decker is a private consultant for several clients, including the Boeing Corporation, the United States Navy, and Walt Disney Imagineering, where he was previously the executive vice president of engineering and production. He has also served as a commissioned officer in the U.S. Army and as a colonel in the U.S. Army Reserve. Before becoming a private consultant, he held several distinguished positions, including those of president and chief executive officer of the Penn Central Federal Systems Company, president and chief executive officer of Acurex Corporation, and Assistant Secretary of the Army/Research, Development, and Acquisition. Mr. Decker currently serves on the National Advi- sory Council for the Johns Hopkins University, Whiting School of Engineering, and on the Board on Army Science and Technology of the National Research Council. He acts as the director of Alliant TechSystems, Anteon Corporation, and the Allied Research Corporation. Mr. Decker is also a trustee for the Hertz Foundation and for the Association of the U.S. Army. He received an M.S. degree in operations research from Stanford University and a B.S. degree in engineering science and electrical engineering from the Johns Hopkins University. Llewellyn S. Dougherty is the vice president, Special Programs, for Raytheon Company. He has served in other areas of the company, including sensors and

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 appeNDIX a communications, radar systems, and reconnaissance systems. Prior to his career at Raytheon, he was technical assistant to the director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. His areas of expertise include avionics, digital com- puters, software, systems engineering, and systems safety. Dr. Dougherty received a Ph.D. in digital systems engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technol- ogy, an M.S. in aeronautics and astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and a B.S. in astronautics and engineering sciences from the U.S. Air Force Academy. John v. Farr is currently a professor and associate dean for academics in the School of Systems and Enterprises for the Stevens Institute of Technology. He is also the founder and principal of Farr Engineering and Management Consult- ing in Cornwall-on-Hudson, N.Y., where he provides quantitative business and decision-support solutions to a wide variety of industrial clients. Dr. Farr started his technical career at U.S. Army Engineers Waterways Experiment Station. He joined the faculty of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in 1992 as the first permanent engineering professor. He was appointed to the rank of full professor at West Point in 2000. He joined the faculty at Stevens Institute of Technology in the fall of 2000 as a professor and the founding director of the Department of Sys- tems Engineering and Engineering Management. He is a fellow in the American Society of Civil Engineers and the American Society of Engineering Management (ASEM) and has authored more than 100 technical publications. He also serves on the Army Science Board and is the past president of ASEM. Dr. Farr received a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan, an M.S. from Purdue University, and a B.S. from Mississippi State University in civil engineering. James H. Frey is currently principal at Frey Associates. Prior to this position, he served as senior vice president, group executive for the Litton Information Systems Group until Northrop Grumman’s purchase of Litton in April 2001. In this position, he led the $1.4 billion group of Litton businesses involved in information technology services. Mr. Frey joined Litton in 1988 as president of Litton Itek Optical Systems and held that position until 1996 when he was appointed vice president of strategic development. Three years later, he became the information systems group executive. He was appointed president of TASC in 1999, a company specializing in systems engineering and program management for large space, intelligence, and information management systems. Prior to join- ing Litton, Mr. Frey spent many years at General Electric, where he rose to the position of general manager of the Spacecraft Division. Since retiring from his position as president of Northrop Grumman TASC in March 2002, he has served on the Advisory Board for the National-Geospatial Intelligence Agency and on special panels supporting the management of the National Reconnaissance Office and the Director of Central Intelligence. He serves on the board of directors of Nortel Government Solutions and Electronic Sensor Technologies and advises

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 pre-MILeSTONe a aND earLY-pHaSe SYSTeMS eNGINeerING a number of private-sector clients, including Next Century, Appistry, Northrop Grumman, and Boeing. Mr. Frey received his B.S. in electrical engineering from Duke University. Robert A. Fuhrman, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, is retired vice chairman of the board, president, and chief operating officer of the Lockheed Corporation, and a former chair of the Air Force Science and Technology Board (now the Air Force Studies Board). Mr. Fuhrman has had a distinguished career, having served as Lockheed’s president and chief operating officer and group president for missiles and space, as well as in numerous other positions. He was directly responsible for the systems engineering of the early fleet ballistic missile (Polaris) programs. He received an M.S. in fluid mechanics and dynamics from the University of Maryland and a B.S. in aeronautical engineering from the University of Michigan. David J. gorney is vice president of space program operations at the Aerospace Corporation and is responsible for the company’s support to all Air Force and Navy satellite programs. Before being named vice president, Dr. Gorney served as general manager of the Navigation Division, directing technical initiatives associated with key upgrades to the Defense Department’s Global Positioning System. Dr. Gorney joined the Aerospace Corporation in 1979 as a mathematician in the Space Sciences Laboratory. Other positions that he held within the labora- tory included those as a member of the technical staff, as a research scientist, and as a manager and a director. Subsequent to these assignments he served as prin- cipal director of four organizations: the Office of Research and Technical Appli- cations, the Office of Research and Engineering, the Defense Support Program, and Meteorological Satellite Systems. He was corporate chief architect/engineer before being named general manager of the Navigation Division in October 2002. Dr. Gorney received Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in atmospheric sciences from the University of California, Los Angeles, and a B.S. degree in physics from the University of Bridgeport in Connecticut. John M. griffin is president of Griffin Consulting, providing systems engineer- ing and program management services to large and mid-sized aerospace firms. He provides strategy planning initiatives for corporations, reviews ongoing pro- grams to assess progress and recommend corrective actions, and participates with industry and government in developing program strategy and implementation tactics. During his civilian career with the Air Force, Mr. Griffin served in a diverse spectrum of capacities with a range of assignments and special duties. He served on numerous special panels, two of which formed the structure of the Air Force Materiel Command. Mr. Griffin was on the development team for ground- breaking technology revolutions in weapon systems, including stealth, unmanned vehicles, hypersonics, and cruise missiles. He retired from the Air Force in 1997.

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 appeNDIX a Mr. Griffin holds an M.S. degree in electrical engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology and a B.S. degree in aeronautical engineering from the University of Detroit. Wesley L. Harris, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, is the Charles Stark Draper Professor and head of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research focuses on theoretical and experimental unsteady aerodynamics and aeroacoustics, on computational fluid dynamics, and on the impact of government policy on the procurement of high-technology systems. Prior to this position he served as the associate administrator for aeronautics at NASA. He has also served as the vice president and chief administrative officer of the University of Tennessee Space Institute. Dr. Harris received a Ph.D. and an M.S. in aerospace and mechanical sciences from Princeton University and a B.S. in aerospace engineering from the University of Virginia. Ronald T. kadish (U.S. Air Force, ret.) is a vice president and partner at Booz Allen Hamilton. He is active in the Defense Team’s Aerospace Market Group and focuses his efforts in the Command, Control, and Communications Market Thrust Team. General Kadish joined Booz Allen Hamilton in February 2005 after retiring from the Air Force as a lieutenant general. He is a former Air Force pilot with more than 2,500 flying hours, and he held a variety of senior systems acquisition, program management, and command positions, including those as program director for the F-15, F-16, and C-17; director of the Missile Defense Agency; and commander of the Center of Excellence for Command and Control Systems. General Kadish received an M.B.A. from the University of Utah and a B.S. in chemistry from St. Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, Pa. Robert H. Latiff is vice president, chief engineer, and technology officer, Space and Geospatial Intelligence, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). Prior to joining SAIC, General Latiff was deputy director for systems engineering, National Reconnaissance Office (NRO). He retired from the Air Force as a major general in 2006. As the NRO’s systems engineer, General Latiff managed the NRO acquisition process and was the functional manager for NRO- wide systems engineering. He worked with senior program managers to define the Integrated NRO Architecture for space-based reconnaissance and intelligence systems. While at the NRO, General Latiff also served as director, Advanced Systems and Technology. General Latiff received his commission after complet- ing the Army Reserve Officer Training Corps program at the University of Notre Dame and subsequently transferred to the Air Force in 1980. He has served on the staffs of Headquarters U.S. Air Force and of the Secretary of the Air Force. In a previous assignment with the Air Force’s Electronic Systems Center, he was the program director for the E-8C, Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar

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 pre-MILeSTONe a aND earLY-pHaSe SYSTeMS eNGINeerING System. General Latiff then commanded the Joint U.S. and Canadian Cheyenne Mountain Operations Center in Colorado Springs, Colo. He received his Ph.D. and M.S. in materials science and a B.S. in physics from the University of Notre Dame. He is a member of the National Research Council’s National Materials Advisory Board (NMAB). Alden v. Munson, Jr., is the deputy director of national intelligence for acquisi- tion in the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, a position he assumed during the term of this study. He was most recently a consultant in intelligence and defense to government and industry. Mr. Munson was senior vice president and group executive of the Litton Information Systems Group. Previously he served as a vice president at TRW in space and ground systems for command and control and intelligence programs. He also served as vice president, operations, in the TRW credit business. Previously, he served as program manager for numerous intelligence systems development projects and led major new business pursuits. Mr. Munson began his career at the Aerospace Corporation, where he provided system engineering and data system analysis and support to many space pro- grams. He was a founding director of Paracel, Inc. (subsequently sold to Aplera) and has held board positions with bd Systems and the Armed Forces Communica- tions and Electronics Association. He serves as an adviser to the San Jose State University College of Engineering. Mr. Munson received a master’s degree in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, and a B.S. degree in mechanical engineering with distinction and departmental honors from San Jose State University. He later completed extensive coursework in computer science at University of California at Los Angeles and attended executive pro- grams at Harvard University (Competition and Strategy) and Stanford University (Management of High Technology Enterprises). In 1997, he was named a Distin- guished Graduate of the San Jose State University College of Engineering, and in 2000, the National Reconnaissance Office named Mr. Munson a Pioneer of National Reconnaissance. Mark k. Wilson, president, Mark Wilson Consulting, retired from the United States Air Force as director of the Center for Systems Engineering, Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. He was respon- sible for planning, directing, and evaluating the development and sustainment efforts of all aspects of the Center for Systems Engineering. He has 38 years of systems engineering acquisition experience, including with capability-based systems engineering, and graduate education as well as extensive experience in flight systems, materials, low observables, and structural technology on the B-2 and F-15 programs. Mr. Wilson is an associate fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and a member of the corporate advisory board of the International Council on Systems Engineering and the National Defense

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 appeNDIX a Industrial Association, Systems Engineering Division, Government Steering Group. Mr. Wilson holds M.S. degrees in management and management science from Stanford University and the University of Dayton, respectively, and a B.S. degree in aerospace engineering from Purdue University.