Appendix B
Biographies

ORGANIZERS

Leonard J. Buckley as manager of the Materials Chemistry Branch at the Naval Research Laboratory’s Chemistry Division, is responsible for guiding research and technology that ranges from fundamental studies in materials synthesis and polymer science to engineering problem solving for U.S. Navy systems. Dr. Buckley was detailed to the Defense Science Office at DARPA in 2001 to manage the Electroactive Polymers Program as well as other efforts involving polymer science and materials chemistry. Dr. Buckley has a doctorate in materials science and engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a master’s degree in polymer science from MIT.


Sharon L. Haynie is a research associate at DuPont Biochemical Science and Engineering Group. Haynie earned a B.A. degree in biochemistry from the University of Pennsylvania in 1976 and a Ph.D. in chemistry from MIT in 1982. She began her DuPont career in 1984 in the company’s Experimental Station on behalf of the Membrane Scouting Group for Polymer Products after three years with the former AT&T Bell Laboratories. Subsequent assignments included the Vascular Graft Program and the Fibers Department Biomaterials Group. Dr. Haynie has worked the last 10 years in Central Research in the Biochemical Science and Engineering Program, seven years with the groundbreaking bio-3G team. Chair-elect of the Philadelphia Section of the American Chemical Society, she is most proud of her collaborations with multidisciplinary teams of chemists, biologists, and engineers in the quest for new ways to make better products that benefit society.


Douglas Ray is the chief research officer at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). He is responsible for defining and advancing PNNL’s science and technology portfolio, coordinating its scientific discretionary investments, providing oversight of the peer-review process at PNNL and its affiliate scientist program, as well as working with counterparts at other DOE laboratories to strengthen the value DOE gets from its national laboratories. A laser spectroscopist, Dr. Ray’s research interests are in the effects of weak intermolecular interactions on chemical phenomena in condensed phases, at interfaces, in clusters, and in supramolecular complexes. Dr. Ray received his Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley. He was a postdoctoral research associate at the Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics, Boulder, Colorado, prior to joining PNNL as a senior research scientist in 1990. He has served in a series of leadership positions in his career at PNNL.

SPEAKERS

Henry E. Bryndza is the technology director for chemical sciences and engineering in DuPont Central Research and Development. Dr. Bryndza joined DuPont in 1981 and has held a variety of technology, planning, marketing, and business roles. He received his S.B. in chemistry from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he conducted research in physical and synthetic organic chemistry with C. G. Swain and D. S. Kemp. He received his Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley, where he did his thesis research on physical organometallic chemistry and catalysis with R. G. Bergman.


Michael J. Clarke is the program director for inorganic, bioinorganic and organometallic, chemistry at NSF and holds a permanent position as a professor of chemistry at Boston College. His research focus is on how unusual transition metal ions interact with biological systems. He has



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Appendix B Biographies ORGANIZERS defining and advancing PNNL’s science and technology portfolio, coordinating its scientific discretionary invest- Leonard J. Buckley as manager of the Materials Chemistry ments, providing oversight of the peer-review process at Branch at the Naval Research Laboratory’s Chemistry Divi- PNNL and its affiliate scientist program, as well as working sion, is responsible for guiding research and technology that with counterparts at other DOE laboratories to strengthen ranges from fundamental studies in materials synthesis and the value DOE gets from its national laboratories. A laser polymer science to engineering problem solving for U.S. spectroscopist, Dr. Ray’s research interests are in the effects Navy systems. Dr. Buckley was detailed to the Defense Sci- of weak intermolecular interactions on chemical phenomena ence Office at DARPA in 2001 to manage the Electroactive in condensed phases, at interfaces, in clusters, and in supra- Polymers Program as well as other efforts involving polymer molecular complexes. Dr. Ray received his Ph.D. in chem- science and materials chemistry. Dr. Buckley has a doctorate istry from the University of California, Berkeley. He was in materials science and engineering from Massachusetts a postdoctoral research associate at the Joint Institute for Institute of Technology and a master’s degree in polymer Laboratory Astrophysics, Boulder, Colorado, prior to joining science from MIT. PNNL as a senior research scientist in 1990. He has served in a series of leadership positions in his career at PNNL. Sharon L. Haynie is a research associate at DuPont Bio- chemical Science and Engineering Group. Haynie earned a SPEAkERS B.A. degree in biochemistry from the University of Pennsyl- vania in 1976 and a Ph.D. in chemistry from MIT in 1982. Henry E. Bryndza is the technology director for chemi- She began her DuPont career in 1984 in the company’s cal sciences and engineering in DuPont Central Research Experimental Station on behalf of the Membrane Scouting and Development. Dr. Bryndza joined DuPont in 1981 Group for Polymer Products after three years with the former and has held a variety of technology, planning, marketing, AT&T Bell Laboratories. Subsequent assignments included and business roles. He received his S.B. in chemistry from the Vascular Graft Program and the Fibers Department Bio- Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he conducted materials Group. Dr. Haynie has worked the last 10 years in research in physical and synthetic organic chemistry with Central Research in the Biochemical Science and Engineer- C. G. Swain and D. S. Kemp. He received his Ph.D. in organic ing Program, seven years with the groundbreaking bio-3G chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley, where team. Chair-elect of the Philadelphia Section of the American he did his thesis research on physical organometallic chem- Chemical Society, she is most proud of her collaborations istry and catalysis with R. G. Bergman. with multidisciplinary teams of chemists, biologists, and engineers in the quest for new ways to make better products Michael J. Clarke is the program director for inorganic, that benefit society. bioinorganic and organometallic, chemistry at NSF and holds a permanent position as a professor of chemistry at Douglas Ray is the chief research officer at Pacific North- Boston College. His research focus is on how unusual tran- west National Laboratory (PNNL). He is responsible for sition metal ions interact with biological systems. He has 

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 APPENDIX B designed and discovered new bioactive metal-containing as cell factories for the production of biofuels, including agents for anticancer and other types of therapy; devel- hydrogen from renewable sources http://www.princeton. oped the activation-by-reduction hypothesis for metal anti- edu/~catalase/. Dr. Dismukes is principal investigator of cancer agents; and participated in developing the concept the BioSolarH2 team, a multi-institutional research center that ruthenium anticancer compounds preferentially enter focusing on microbial hydrogen http://www.princeton.edu/ cancer cells through binding to transferrin. He was among ~biosolar/. His independent academic career has been spent the first to explore how ruthenium complexes bind to DNA entirely at Princeton University, where he currently teaches and developed some of the early fundamental chemistry of or coteaches three courses entitled Production of Renewable technetium relevant to its use in radioimaging agents. He Fuels and Energy, Astrobiology: Life in the Universe, and continues to explore how metal ions affect DNA, RNA, the undergraduate chemistry majors laboratory. Dismukes coenzymes, and important sulfur-containing polypeptides received his Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of such as glutathione. Dr. Clarke is currently interested in how Wisconsin-Madison with John Willard, and did postdoctoral nitrosyl ruthenium compounds can affect the strengthening work in the Calvin Laboratory at the University of California, of neuronal synapses through the release of nitric oxide at Berkeley, with Kenneth Sauer and Melvin Klein. the neuronal site. Mark D. Emptage is the biology team leader for the Marcetta Y. Darensbourg received her Ph.D. from the Integrated Corn Biorefinery Program in Central Research University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, in 1967, work- and Development at DuPont. He received his Ph.D. in ing with T. L. Brown on organolithium chemistry. Follow- biochemistry from the University of Illinois. He was a post- ing two years each at Vassar College and SUNY Buffalo, doctoral fellow in the Enzyme Institute at the University of she rose through the academic ranks at Tulane University. Wisconsin before joining Central Research at DuPont in During that time, a sabbatical year was spent at Cornell 1984. Previous to the biorefinery program Dr. Emptage was University in the laboratories of Earl Muetterties. In 1982 a task leader in the development of the PDO biocatalyst that she and Don Darensbourg moved to Texas A&M University. is being used commercially to ferment sugar to BioPDO for She has coedited Experimental Organometallic Chemistry, DuPont’s newest polymer platform, Sorona™. an American Chemical Society (ACS) symposium volume, Brent Erickson is executive vice president in charge of the and Volume 32 of Inorganic Syntheses. She has served on the ACS Division of Inorganic Chemistry (DIC) governance Industrial and Environmental Section at the Biotechnology as chair and also as chair of the Organometallic Subdivision Industry Organization (BIO). BIO represents more than of the DIC. Darensbourg currently serves on three editorial 1,100 biotechnology companies, academic institutions, state boards: Inorganic Chemistry, Organometallics, and Accounts biotechnology centers, and related organizations across the of Chemical Research. Dr. Darensbourg’s awards include the United States and 31 other nations. Mr. Erickson holds a ACS Distinguished Service Award in the Advancement of B.S. in biology and an M.A. in international studies. After Inorganic Chemistry, 1996; Association of Former Students completing his undergraduate degree, he was involved in (AFS) of Texas A&M Distinguished Teaching Award, 1986 fossil fuel research for three years at the U.S. Department of and 2006; AFS Texas A&M Distinguished Research Award, Energy’s Laramie Energy Technology Center. After complet- 1995. Her research interests are broadly in inorganic and ing graduate school, Mr. Erickson joined the staff of U.S. organometallic reaction mechanisms; and currently, these are Senator Alan K. Simpson (R-Wyo.) as a legislative assistant applied to bioinorganic systems such as hydrogenase (H2ase) handling energy, public lands, environment, defense and enzymes. Synthetic programs are in bioorganometallic arms control issues. In 1993 Mr. Erickson became legislative chemistry and include synthetic analogues of enzyme director and managed all legislative and policy issues for the active sites such as [NiFe]H2ase, [FeFe] H2ase, acetyl coA senator, who was then the Senate Republican whip. In 1996 synthase, and nickel superoxide dismutase. She has mentored Mr. Erickson joined the American Petroleum Institute (API) some 40 graduate students through to the Ph.D. degree. as a Washington representative and directed government relations efforts on energy and environmental issues. He was G. Charles Dismukes is professor of chemistry at Princeton chosen to chair a Senate task force of the multiindustry Air University and an affiliated member of the Princeton Envi- Quality Standards Coalition. While at API he earned three ronmental Institute and the Princeton Materials Institute. His special achievement awards. Mr. Erickson joined BIO in research interests focus on biological and chemical methods 2000 as director of the Industrial and Environmental Section. for solar-based fuel production, photosynthesis, metals in He was promoted to vice president in 2001 and executive biological systems, and tools for investigating these systems. vice president in 2005. His published works describe the biology and chemistry of Thomas A. Moore is a professor of chemistry and bio- oxygen production in natural photosynthetic systems, the synthesis and characterization of bioinspired catalysts for chemistry at Arizona State University and director of the renewable energy production, the use of microorganisms Center for the Study of Early Events in Photosynthesis

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 APPENDIX B located in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. He is Foundation, a Center of Excellence Lectureship from Kyoto the interim director of the Center for Bioenergy and Photo- University, and a Grass Fellowship from the Radcliffe Insti- synthesis in the Global Institute of Sustainability at ASU. He tute for Advanced Study at Harvard University. She currently was awarded a Chaire Internationale de Recherche Blaise serves on the editorial board of the American Chemical Pascal, Région d’Ile de France, Service de Bioénergétique, Society journal Crystal Growth & Design and is a consul- CEA Saclay, France, for the period 2005-2007. Professor tant to industry and government agencies in areas such as Moore has a Ph.D. in chemistry from Texas Tech University. biofuel cells, biosensors, batteries, and energy harvesting. He served as president of the American Society for Photo- Her current research addresses the problem of integrating biology in 2004 and received the Senior Research Award biology with electronics and energy storage devices from from the Society in 2001. He teaches undergraduate and two directions simultaneously: (a) by designing, fabricat- graduate courses in biochemistry at ASU and lectures in ing, and analyzing operational bioelectronic devices; and biophysics at the Universitè de Paris Sud, Orsay. Professor (b) by establishing a method for controlling how materials Moore’s research in artificial photosynthesis is aimed at the self-assemble. design, synthesis, and assembly of bioinspired constructs Magdalena Ramirez is the project leader for heavy oil capable of sustainable energy production and use. pretreatment processes at British Petroleum (BP) in the Daniel G. Nocera, the W. M. Keck Professor of Energy at the United Kingdom. She received her Ph.D. in chemistry from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is widely recognized the University of Bath and worked as a senior specialist for as a leading researcher in renewable energy at the molecular emergent technologies at PDVSA-Intevep S.A. for 22 years level. Dr. Nocera studies the basic mechanisms of energy before joining BP. Ramirez has also been a senior lecturer conversion in biology and chemistry with primary focus in on technology and innovation management for Universidad recent years on the photogeneration of hydrogen and oxygen. Catolica Andres Bello (Venezuela) and a professor in and The overall reactions require the coupling of multielectron chair of the chemical engineering faculty of Universidad processes to protons and are energetically uphill, thus requir- Central de Venezuela. Her research has touched on many ing a light input. He has pioneered each of these areas of areas, including biocatalysis, adsorbents, selective hydroge- science. Most examples of multielectron photoreactions have nation, and heavy oil upgrading, and has contributed to 130 originated from his research group in the past decade. This worldwide patents, 100 published papers, and 120 technical work has relied on the generalization of the concept of two- reports. electron mixed-valency in chemistry. He created the field of Judy A. Raper is the division director for chemical, bioen- proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) at a mechanistic level with the publication of the first ultrafast laser study of gineering, environmental and transport Systems (CBET) in an electron transfer through a hydrogen-bonded interface. the Engineering Directorate of the National Science Founda- With the frameworks of multielectron chemistry and PCET tion. Dr. Raper recently joined NSF after serving as chair of in place, Dr. Nocera and his graduate student, Alan Heyduk, the chemical and biological engineering department at the described the first molecule to produce hydrogen photo- University of Missouri-Rolla. She is also the former dean catalytically from homogeneous solutions of hydrohalic of engineering at Sydney University in New South Wales, acid. Dr. Nocera’s research in energy conversion has been Australia. Dr. Raper earned a Ph.D. in chemical engineer- featured on the nationally broadcast television programs, ing in 1980 from the University of New South Wales. Her ABC Nightline and PBS NOVA in the United States and research interests include particle technology, droplets, Explora in Europe. In 2005 he was awarded the Italgas Prize sprays, aerosols, filtration, and electrostatic effects. Active for fundamental contributions to the development of renew- in scholarship and research, Dr. Raper served as chair for the able energy at the molecular level. 4th World Congress on Particle Technology held in Sydney in 2002. Dr. Raper has been involved in policy formation and G. Tayhas R. Palmore is a professor of engineering and dissemination and change management at the national level medical science at Brown University, where she teaches through her work with the Australian Research Council. She undergraduate and graduate courses in biomaterials and is a member of the Particle Technology Forum, associated thermodynamics. Dr. Palmore earned her Ph.D. in chemistry with the American Institute of Chemical Engineering, and from MIT and was a postdoctoral fellow in the Department is a fellow of the Institution of Engineers Australia, Institu- of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Harvard University. tion of Chemical Engineering (United Kingdom), and the In 2001, she cofounded the Center for Biomedical Engineer- Australian Institution of Mining and Metallurgy. ing at Brown University, and in 2002 she coestablished the Thomas B. Rauchfuss is a professor of chemistry at the Ph.D. program in Biomedical Engineering. Dr. Palmore has received numerous awards, including postdoctoral fellow- University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He received ships from the National Science Foundation and the Ford his Ph.D. from Washington State University in 1976. He has Foundation, a CAREER Award from the National Science studied overseas at the following institutions: the Australian

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 APPENDIX B National University, University of Auckland, University electrode materials for high-energy-density lithium batteries of Strasbourg, and the Technical University of Karlsruhe. and fundamental processes of charge transfer at semi- Dr. Rauchfuss is interested in all aspects of the synthesis conductor electrodes. Dr. Turner’smonolithic photovoltaic- and reactivity of inorganic, organometallic, and main-group photoelectrochemical device has the highest efficiency for compounds and materials. He has received a number of any direct conversion water splitting device (>12 percent). awards for his contributions and is a fellow of both the Royal He has twice received the Midwestern Research Institute Society of Chemistry and the Japan Society for the Promo- President’s Award for Exceptional Performance in Research. tion of Science. He has received the Hydrogen Technical Advisory Panel Award for Research Excellence, an Idaho State University Eric A. Rohlfing is the director of the chemical sciences, Outstanding Achievement Award, and two Outstanding geosciences and biosciences division in the Office of Basic Mentor Awards from the U.S. Department of Energy for his Energy Sciences (BES), Office of Science, Department of work with undergraduate students. Dr. Turner is the author Energy. He received his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from or coauthor of over 75 peer-reviewed publications in the Princeton University in 1982. He held postdoctoral appoint- areas of photoelectrochemistry, fuel cells, batteries, general ments at Exxon Research and Engineering Company and at electrochemistry, and analytical chemistry. Los Alamos National Laboratory before joining the staff at Michael R. Wasielewski received his Ph.D.from the Uni- the Combustion Research Facility at Sandia National Labo- ratories in 1986. Rohlfing joined BES in 1997 and served versity of Chicago in chemistry, where he carried out his as program manager of the Atomic, Molecular and Optical graduate research under the guidance of Leon M. Stock. Sciences Program from 2000 to 2003 and as team leader for Following his graduate work, he performed postdoctoral Fundamental Interactions from 2003 to the present. research, first with Ronald Breslow at Columbia University Dr. Rohlfing’s research interests include the experimental and then with Joseph Katz at the Argonne National Labora- characterization of transient molecules relevant to combus- tory. Subsequently, Dr. Wasielewski joined the scientific staff tion processes, linear and nonlinear laser spectroscopies, of the Argonne National Laboratory, where he rose through trace detection of pollutants, molecular beam and mass the ranks to become a senior scientist and group leader of spectrometric studies of carbon and metal clusters, and vibra- the Molecular Photonics Group. In 1994 Wasielewski joined tional relaxation dynamics. He is the author of approximately the faculty of Northwestern University, where he is now 50 peer-reviewed articles, holds membership in the American professor of chemistry. He served as chair of the chemistry Chemical Society and the American Physical Society, and is department from 2001 to 2004. a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement Wasielewski’s research interests comprise photoinduced of Science. electron transfer and charge transport in organic molecules and materials, artificial and natural photosynthesis, self- John A. Turner is a principal scientist at the National assembly of nanoscale materials, spin dynamics of multispin Renewable Energy Laboratory. He received his Ph.D. from organic molecules, materials for molecule-based opto- Colorado State University, and completed a postdoctoral electronics and spintronics, and time-resolved optical and appointment at the California Institute of Technology before magnetic resonance spectroscopy. His research has resulted joining the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in 1979. in over 300 publications. Dr. Wasielewski was elected a His research is primarily concerned with enabling tech- fellow of the American Association for the Advancement nologies for the implementation of hydrogen systems into of Science in 1995, and has held numerous distinguished the energy infrastructure. This includes direct conversion lectureships and fellowships. Among Wasielewski’s recent (photoelectrolysis) systems for hydrogen production from awards are the 2004 Photochemistry Research Award of the sunlight and water, advanced materials for high tempera- Inter-American Photochemical Society and the 2006 James ture fuel cell membranes, and corrosion protection for fuel Flack Norris Award in Physical Organic Chemistry of the cell metal bipolar plates. Other work involves the study of American Chemical Society.