Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

M. Joan Alexander (Chair) is a Senior Research Scientist at NorthWest Research Associates, Colorado Research Associates Division (Boulder, Colorado), an Adjoint Associate Professor in the Program for Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at the University of Colorado. The focus of her research is on atmospheric waves in the stratosphere. Her work involves both observational analyses and theoretical modeling to better understand the nature of these waves, their properties, their sources, and their many effects in the atmosphere. She currently serves on the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate and will serve as liaison from the board for this committee. She is a fellow of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) and has served as the president of the American Geophysical Union's Atmospheric Sciences Section, as a member of the AMS's Committee on the Middle Atmosphere, and as the secretary of the International Committee for Dynamic Meteorology. Dr. Alexander received her Ph.D. in Astrophysical, Planetary, and Atmospheric Sciences from the University of Colorado, Boulder.


Derek Cunnold is a Professor Emeritus in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Science at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His research interests include remote sensing of the atmosphere, satellite observations, particularly of ozone, and atmospheric transport of trace gases, three-dimensional modeling of the stratosphere, and sources of trace gases and their accumulation in the atmosphere. He has served as a lead author and co-author on previous ozone assessment reports. He was also a contributor to International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme’s Overview of the Global Emissions Inventory Activity (2000). He earned his Ph.D. from Cornell.


Terry Deshler is a Professor in the Department of Atmospheric Science and the College of Engineering at the University of Wyoming. Dr. Deshler is an expert in performing and analyzing balloon-borne measurements of stratospheric aerosol and ozone in the mid latitudes and polar regions of both hemispheres. His interests include documenting the severe ozone loss observed above Antarctica each year, investigating polar stratospheric clouds in both hemispheres, and measuring mid and low latitude stratospheric aerosol, including the effects of major volcanic eruptions. Polar stratospheric clouds are essential pre-cursors to polar ozone loss. Mid latitude stratospheric aerosol play a role in the chemical and radiation balance of the stratosphere. Dr. Deshler has published widely in these areas: author or co-author of over 100 refereed scientific publications, co-author of a chapter for the 1998 UNEP/WMO ozone assessment report, author of a chapter for the SPARC assessment of stratospheric aerosols. In 1982, he received his Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Wyoming.


Steven Lloyd is Senior Professional Staff in Atmospheric Chemistry and Radiation at the Applied Physics Laboratory at Johns Hopkins University. His research focuses on measurements of global UV effective reflectivity from the TOMS and SBUV(/2) satellite instruments, validation of these measurements, and spaceborne remote sensing of ozone. He has



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Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff M. Joan Alexander (Chair) is a Senior Research Scientist at NorthWest Research Associates, Colorado Research Associates Division (Boulder, Colorado), an Adjoint Associate Professor in the Program for Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at the University of Colorado. The focus of her research is on atmospheric waves in the stratosphere. Her work involves both observational analyses and theoretical modeling to better understand the nature of these waves, their properties, their sources, and their many effects in the atmosphere. She currently serves on the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate and will serve as liaison from the board for this committee. She is a fellow of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) and has served as the president of the American Geophysical Union's Atmospheric Sciences Section, as a member of the AMS's Committee on the Middle Atmosphere, and as the secretary of the International Committee for Dynamic Meteorology. Dr. Alexander received her Ph.D. in Astrophysical, Planetary, and Atmospheric Sciences from the University of Colorado, Boulder. Derek Cunnold is a Professor Emeritus in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Science at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His research interests include remote sensing of the atmosphere, satellite observations, particularly of ozone, and atmospheric transport of trace gases, three-dimensional modeling of the stratosphere, and sources of trace gases and their accumulation in the atmosphere. He has served as a lead author and co-author on previous ozone assessment reports. He was also a contributor to International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme’s Overview of the Global Emissions Inventory Activity (2000). He earned his Ph.D. from Cornell. Terry Deshler is a Professor in the Department of Atmospheric Science and the College of Engineering at the University of Wyoming. Dr. Deshler is an expert in performing and analyzing balloon-borne measurements of stratospheric aerosol and ozone in the mid latitudes and polar regions of both hemispheres. His interests include documenting the severe ozone loss observed above Antarctica each year, investigating polar stratospheric clouds in both hemispheres, and measuring mid and low latitude stratospheric aerosol, including the effects of major volcanic eruptions. Polar stratospheric clouds are essential pre-cursors to polar ozone loss. Mid latitude stratospheric aerosol play a role in the chemical and radiation balance of the stratosphere. Dr. Deshler has published widely in these areas: author or co-author of over 100 refereed scientific publications, co-author of a chapter for the 1998 UNEP/WMO ozone assessment report, author of a chapter for the SPARC assessment of stratospheric aerosols. In 1982, he received his Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Wyoming. Steven Lloyd is Senior Professional Staff in Atmospheric Chemistry and Radiation at the Applied Physics Laboratory at Johns Hopkins University. His research focuses on measurements of global UV effective reflectivity from the TOMS and SBUV(/2) satellite instruments, validation of these measurements, and spaceborne remote sensing of ozone. He has 60

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Review of Individual Sections 61 served as PI on a NASA project called “Modeling and Analysis of the Lower Stratospheric Radiation Field” and as a member of NASA’s Solar Occultation Satellite Science Team. In 1993, he earned his Ph.D. from Harvard University. For the book entitled Ecosystem Change and Public Health: A Global Perspective, he wrote the chapter on “The Changing Chemistry of Earth’s Atmosphere”. Mack McFarland is an Environmental Fellow at DuPont Fluoroproducts. Dr. McFarland received a B.S. in chemistry from the University of Texas at Austin in 1970 and a Ph.D. in Chemical Physics from the University of Colorado in 1973. From 1974 through 1983, first as a Post-Doctoral Fellow at York University and then as research scientist at the NOAA Aeronomy Laboratory, he planned, conducted, and interpreted field experiments designed to probe the cycles that control atmospheric ozone concentrations. These studies included measurements of gases and processes important to the global climate change issue. In late 1983, he joined the DuPont Company. His primary responsibilities have been in coordinating research programs and assessment and interpretation of scientific information on stratospheric ozone depletion and global climate change as a basis for policy decisions on these global environmental issues. During 1995 and 1996, Dr. McFarland was on loan to the Atmosphere Unit of the United Nations Environment Program, and in 1997, he was on loan to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Working Group II Technical Support Unit. The value of his contributions to DuPont has been recognized through the 2007 Pedersen Award, a C&P Flagship Award, Environmental Respect Awards, and Environmental Excellence Awards. In 1999, he was awarded an individual Climate Protection Award by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for his contributions in providing understandable, reliable information to decision makers. Dr. McFarland has served on the NRC Committee Panel for Chemical Science and Technology and the Committee on the Analysis of Global Change Assessments. He has participated in every major international scientific assessment on stratospheric ozone and global climate change as author, reviewer, or review editor.” Michelle Santee is the Group Supervisor of the Microwave Atmospheric Science Group at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Her research interests include: polar processes in the lower stratosphere, such as chlorine activation and deactivation, polar stratospheric cloud formation, denitrification and dehydration, and ozone loss; processes controlling HNO3 in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UT/LS); transport of pollution in the UT/LS; and the influence of solar storms on the upper stratosphere. She contributed to the polar chapter of the 2006 Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion. In 1993, she earned her Ph.D. in Planetary Science from California Institute of Technology. Theodore G. Shepherd is a Professor of Physics at the University of Toronto. Stimulated by his role as PI in the development and use of the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model since 1992, his applied research focuses on the middle atmosphere, including the ozone layer. He was a member of the Steering Committee for the 2006 Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion. As a part of WCRP’s SPARC, he was a co-chair of the initiative on Detection, Attribution, and Prediction of Stratospheric Change. For a 2005 IPCC Special Report entitled Safeguarding the Ozone Layer and the Global Climate System, Dr. Shepherd co-authored the chapter called “Ozone and Climate: A Review of Interconnections”. He received his Ph.D. in 1984 from MIT, and was just made a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.

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Review of CCSP SAP 2.4 62 Margaret Tolbert is a Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Colorado. Dr. Tolbert is a pioneer in understanding the chemistry and physics of particles in the atmosphere. In landmark work, she identified the role of surface reactions on solid and liquid stratospheric clouds. She proposed a new phase for some polar stratospheric clouds, and demonstrated key cirrus cloud processes in midlatitude ozone depletion. She served on the review panel of the 1994 ozone assessment report. She has also served as Associate Editor of the journal Atmospheric Environment. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and she has served on the National Academies' Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry. She earned her Ph.D. in 1986 from California Institute of Technology. Don Wuebbles is the Director of the School of Earth, Society, and Environment and a Professor in the Department of Atmospheric Science at the University of Illinois. Dr. Wuebbles spent many years as a research scientist and group leader at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory before returning to the University of Illinois in 1994. His research emphasizes the development and use of mathematical models of the atmosphere to study the chemical and physical processes that determine atmospheric structure. He is the author of about 400 scientific articles, most of which relate to atmospheric chemistry and global climate change as affected by both human activities and natural phenomena. He also directs a number of research projects that are primarily oriented towards improving our understanding of the impacts that man-made and natural trace gases may be having on the Earth’s climate and on tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry, with emphasis on concerns about global ozone. He has played a major role in the national and international assessments of the effects of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and other halocarbons on ozone. He developed the concept of Ozone Depletion Potentials used in most policymaking relative to protection of the ozone layer (e.g., the Montreal Protocol and its amendments, the U.S. Clean Air Act). Dr. Wuebbles and his research team have developed a range of computational models of global atmospheric chemistry and physics that are applied to the study of natural (e.g., volcanic eruptions; solar flux variations; solar particle effects) and human-related (e.g., emissions of CFCs, halons, other halocarbons, methane, plus nitrogen oxides and other gases and aerosols from aircraft) effects on tropospheric and stratospheric ozone. These models are also used in studies along with data from atmospheric measurements to further our understanding of the relationships between chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere. He has served as a lead author and co-author on most of the international ozone assessments. He served on the NRC Committee to Assess Fire Suppression Substitutes and Alternatives to Halon. He earned his Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science at UC Davis. Staff: Leah Probst is a research associate with the NRC’s Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate and Polar Research Board. Since joining the NRC staff in 1999, Ms. Probst has led studies on the science and implementation plan for the World Climate Research Programme’s Americas Prediction Project and on the proposed Global Precipitation Measurement satellite mission. She works with the U.S. National Committee on the International Polar Year 2007- 2008 and with the NRC’s Climate Research Committee. She has contributed to many other NRC studies, including topics such as surface temperature reconstructions for the last 2,000 years, the

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Review of Individual Sections 63 Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite program, the New Source Review Program of the Clean Air Act, and cumulative effects of oil and gas activities on Alaska’s North Slope. She received a B.A. in biology from George Washington University. Katherine Weller is a Senior Program Assistant for the NRC’s Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate and the Polar Research Board. Since joining the National Academies in 2006, Ms. Weller has worked with the Climate Research Committee, and has worked with committees to review the Climate Change Science Program’s Synthesis and Assessment Products 3.3 and 5.2. In 2004, she received a B.S. in biopsychology from the University of Michigan. She is currently working toward a master’s degree in environmental science and policy from Johns Hopkins University.

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