Biosketches

Kevin Grumbach, M.D., is professor and chair of the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), and chief of Family and Community Medicine at San Francisco General Hospital. He is the director of the UCSF Center for California Health Workforce Studies, co-director of the UCSF Center for Excellence in Primary Care, and co-director of the Community Engagement Program for the UCSF Clinical Translational Science Institute. His research on topics such as primary care physician supply and access to care, racial and ethnic diversity in the health professions, and the impact of managed care on physicians has been published in major medical journals such as the New England Journal of Medicine and JAMA and has been cited widely in both health policy forums and the general media. With Tom Bodenheimer, he coauthored what has become the best-selling textbook on health policy, Understanding Health Policy: A Clinical Approach, and the recent book Improving Primary Care: Strategies and Tools for a Better Practice, both published by McGraw Hill-Lange. He received a Generalist Physician Faculty Scholar award from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Health Resources and Services Administration Award for Health Workforce Research on Diversity, and in 1997 was elected a member of the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Grumbach is co-chair of the UCSF University–Community Partnership Council and a founding member of the California Physicians’ Alliance, the California chapter of Physicians for a National Health Program. He practices family medicine at the Family Health Center at San Francisco General Hospital.



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Biosketches ❧ Kevin Grumbach, M.D., is professor and chair of the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), and chief of Family and Community Medicine at San Francisco General Hospital. He is the director of the UCSF Center for California Health Workforce Studies, co-director of the UCSF Center for Excellence in Primary Care, and co-director of the Community Engage- ment Program for the UCSF Clinical Translational Science Institute. His research on topics such as primary care physician supply and access to care, racial and ethnic diversity in the health professions, and the impact of managed care on physicians has been published in major medical journals such as the New England Journal of Medicine and JAMA and has been cited widely in both health policy forums and the general media. With Tom Bodenheimer, he coauthored what has become the best-selling textbook on health policy, Understanding Health Policy: A Clinical Approach, and the recent book Improing Primary Care: Strategies and Tools for a Better Practice, both published by McGraw Hill-Lange. He received a Generalist Physician Faculty Scholar award from the Robert Wood Johnson Founda- tion, the Health Resources and Services Administration Award for Health Workforce Research on Diversity, and in 1997 was elected a member of the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Grumbach is co-chair of the UCSF University–Community Partnership Council and a founding member of the California Physicians’ Alliance, the California chapter of Physicians for a National Health Program. He practices family medicine at the Family Health Center at San Francisco General Hospital. 3

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40 TRANSFORMING TODAY’S HEALTH CARE WORKFORCE Fitzhugh Mullan, M.D., is the Murdock Head Professor of Medicine and Health Policy at the George Washington University School of Public Health and a Professor of Pediatrics at the George Washington University School of Medicine. He is also a member of the medical staff at the Upper Cardozo Community Health Center in Washington, D.C. Dr. Mullan grad- uated cum laude from Harvard University in 1964 with a degree in history and from the University of Chicago Medical School in 1968. He trained in pediatrics at the Jacobi and Lincoln Hospitals in the Bronx, New York. In 1972 he was commissioned in the United States Public Health Service and practiced in New Mexico as one of the first physicians in the National Health Service Corps. From 1977 through 1981, he served as director of the National Health Service Corps in Washington, D.C., followed by tours as a scholar-in-residence at the Institute of Medicine (IOM), as a senior medical officer at the National Institutes of Health, and from 1984 to 1985 as the secretary of the Health and Environment Department for the state of New Mexico. From 1986 to 1988 he was on faculty in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, followed by 2 years on the staff of the Surgeon General, directing the Office of Public Health History. He was appointed director of the Bureau of Health Professions in the Health Resources and Services Administration in 1990 and to the rank of assistant surgeon general (rear admiral) in 1991. In subsequent years he served on both the President’s Task Force on Health Care Reform and the Council on Graduate Medical Education. In 1996 he retired from the Public Health Service and joined the staff of the journal Health Affairs as a contributing editor and the editor of the Narrative Matters section, positions he continues to hold. In recent years his research and policy work have focused on the United States and international health workforce issues, with particular emphasis on capac- ity building in Africa. He has written widely for both professional and general audiences on medical and health policy topics. His books include White Coat, Clenched Fist: The Political Education of an American Physician (Macmillan, 1977), Vital Signs: A Young Doctor’s Struggle with Cancer (Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 1983), Plagues and Politics: The Story of the United States Public Health Serice (Basic Books, 1989), and Big Doctoring in America: Profiles in Primary Care (University of California Press/Milbank Fund, 2002). He was the senior editor of Healers Abroad: Americans Responding to Human Resource Crisis in HIV/AIDS (The National Academies Press, 2005) and Narratie Matters: The Power of the Personal Essay in Health Policy (Johns Hopkins Press, 2006). Dr. Mullan is the founding president of the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship. He is the recipient of the American Cancer Society’s 1988 Courage Award, the Society for Surgical Oncology’s 1989 James Ewing medal, the Surgeon General’s Medallion, and the Unit- ed States Public Health Service’s Distinguished Service Medal. He serves

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4 BIOSKETCHES as vice-chair of the Board of Trustees of the National Health Museum. He is a member of the IOM of the National Academy of Sciences. Marla E. Salmon, Sc.D., R.N., FAAN, is dean and professor at the Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing and Rollins School of Public Health as well as director of the Lillian Carter Center for International Nursing at Emory University. In addition to her work in academic and clinical nurs- ing, Dr. Salmon has held senior leadership positions in professional and national government service. Her career focus has been on national and international health policy, administration, public health, and workforce development. As former Division of Nursing director and chief nursing officer of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Dr. Salmon led key federal programs aimed at shaping the nation’s nursing workforce. She continued this work when she chaired the National Advisory Com- mittee on Nursing Education and Practice, and on an international level while serving as former chair of the Global Advisory Group on Nursing and Midwifery of the World Health Organization. Dr. Salmon has been called upon to play significant advisory roles nationally and internation- ally, including membership on the White House Task Force on Health Care Reform, the American Nurses Credentialing Center Magnet Think Tank, and more recently on several committees for the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies, including the Committee on the Op- tions for Overseas Placement of U.S. Health Professionals and the Nursing Panel Committee on Monitoring the Changing Needs for Biomedical and Behavioral Research Personnel Study. She has served as a consultant to the World Health Organization and has worked extensively with govern- ment and corporate partners in the Caribbean region and elsewhere. Dr. Salmon serves on a number of professional boards, including the Nursing Advisory Council of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, the Board of Directors of the National Council on Health- care Leadership, and the Board of Trustees of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, including former membership on their National Advisory Committee for the Executive Nurse Fellows Program. She has published extensively and is a member of several editorial boards, including Journal of Nursing Scholarship and Nursing and Health Policy Reiew. Dr. Salmon has received prestigious awards and recognitions, including membership in the IOM and the American Academy of Nursing. Her federal leadership led to her receipt of the President’s Meritorious Executive Award and both the U.S. Public Health Service’s Chief Nurse Award and Special Recogni- tion Award. Dr. Salmon has received the American Nurses Association Community Health Nurse of the Year Award and was recognized by the National Black Nurses’ Foundation for her role in enhancing the ethnic and racial diversity of the nation’s nursing workforce. She received her

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42 TRANSFORMING TODAY’S HEALTH CARE WORKFORCE doctor of science from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health, holds degrees in nursing and political science from the University of Portland, is a Fulbright Scholar, and is the recipient of honorary degrees from the University of Portland and the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Dr. Salmon is a fellow with the W. K. Kellogg National Fellowship Program and the Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs.