APPENDIX C
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF PANEL MEMBERS AND STAFF

Lawrence D. Brown (Chair) is the Miers Bush professor in the Department of Statistics of the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania. His research has been in the areas of statistical decision theory, statistical inference, nonparametric function estimation, foundations of statistics, sampling theory (census data), and empirical queueing science. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. At the National Research Council, he was a member of the Committee on National Statistics and served on its Panel to Review the 2000 Census; he also served on the Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications and its Board on Mathematical Sciences. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and is a fellow and past president of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics. He has a B.S. from the California Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. from Cornell University.


Richard Berk is professor of criminology and statistics at the University of Pennsylvania. He is active regarding a range of methodological concerns, such as causal inference, statistical learning, and methods for evaluating social programs. His main areas of research include the inmate classification and placement systems, law enforcement strategies for reducing domestic violence, the role of race in capital punishment, detecting violations of environmental regulations, claims that the death penalty serves as a general deterrent, and forecasting short-term changes in urban crime patterns. Currently, he is working on a project on the development and application of statistical learning procedures for data sets in the behavioral, social, and economic sciences. He was elected to the Sociological Research Association and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Statistical Association, and the Academy of Experimental Criminology. He was awarded the Paul S. Lazarsfeld Award for methodological contributions from the American Sociological Association. For the National Research Council, he has served on the Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics, the Panel on Monitoring the Social Impact of the AIDS Epidemic, the Working Group on Field Experimentation in Criminal Justice, and the Panel on Sentencing. He has a B.A. from Yale University (1964) and a Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University (1970).


Eric Bradlow is the K.P. Chao professor of marketing, statistics, and education in the Wharton School of Business of the University of Pennsylvania. He previously held positions at the Educational Testing Service and at E.I. DuPont de Nemours and Company. He serves as associate editor for the Journal of Computational and Graphical Statistics, Marketing Science, Quantitative Marketing and Economics, and Psychometrika, and as senior associate editor for the Journal of Educational and Behavioral Statistics. He has won numerous teaching awards, and his research interests include Bayesian modeling, statistical computing, and developing new methodology for unique data structures. His current projects center on optimal resource allocation, choice modeling, and complex latent structures. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. At the National Research Council, he was a member of the Panel to Review the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Measurement of Food Insecurity and Hunger. He



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APPENDIX C BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF PANEL MEMBERS AND STAFF Lawrence D. Brown (Chair) is the Miers Bush professor in the Department of Statistics of the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania. His research has been in the areas of statistical decision theory, statistical inference, nonparametric function estimation, foundations of statistics, sampling theory (census data), and empirical queueing science. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. At the National Research Council, he was a member of the Committee on National Statistics and served on its Panel to Review the 2000 Census; he also served on the Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications and its Board on Mathematical Sciences. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and is a fellow and past president of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics. He has a B.S. from the California Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. from Cornell University. Richard Berk is professor of criminology and statistics at the University of Pennsylvania. He is active regarding a range of methodological concerns, such as causal inference, statistical learning, and methods for evaluating social programs. His main areas of research include the inmate classification and placement systems, law enforcement strategies for reducing domestic violence, the role of race in capital punishment, detecting violations of environmental regulations, claims that the death penalty serves as a general deterrent, and forecasting short-term changes in urban crime patterns. Currently, he is working on a project on the development and application of statistical learning procedures for data sets in the behavioral, social, and economic sciences. He was elected to the Sociological Research Association and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Statistical Association, and the Academy of Experimental Criminology. He was awarded the Paul S. Lazarsfeld Award for methodological contributions from the American Sociological Association. For the National Research Council, he has served on the Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics, the Panel on Monitoring the Social Impact of the AIDS Epidemic, the Working Group on Field Experimentation in Criminal Justice, and the Panel on Sentencing. He has a B.A. from Yale University (1964) and a Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University (1970). Eric Bradlow is the K.P. Chao professor of marketing, statistics, and education in the Wharton School of Business of the University of Pennsylvania. He previously held positions at the Educational Testing Service and at E.I. DuPont de Nemours and Company. He serves as associate editor for the Journal of Computational and Graphical Statistics, Marketing Science, Quantitative Marketing and Economics, and Psychometrika, and as senior associate editor for the Journal of Educational and Behavioral Statistics. He has won numerous teaching awards, and his research interests include Bayesian modeling, statistical computing, and developing new methodology for unique data structures. His current projects center on optimal resource allocation, choice modeling, and complex latent structures. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. At the National Research Council, he was a member of the Panel to Review the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Measurement of Food Insecurity and Hunger. He 93

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has a B.S. from the University of Pennsylvania (1988) and A.M. (1990) and Ph.D. (1994) degrees, the latter in mathematical statistics, from Harvard University. Michael L. Cohen (Co-Study Director) is a senior program officer for the Committee on National Statistics, currently serving as study director for the Panel on the Functionality and Usability of Data from the American Community Survey and the Panel on Coverage Evaluation and Correlation Bias in the 2010 Census. Formerly, he was a mathematical statistician at the Energy Information Administration, an assistant professor in the School of Public Affairs at the University of Maryland, and a visiting lecturer in statistics at Princeton University. His general area of research in the use of statistics in public policy, with particular interest in census undercount, model validation, and robust estimation. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. He has a B.S. in mathematics from the University of Michigan and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in statistics from Stanford University. Daniel L. Cork (Co-Study Director) is a senior program officer for the Committee on National Statistics, currently serving as study director of the Panel to Review the Programs of the Bureau of Justice Statistics. Previously he served as study director of the Panel on Residence Rules in the Decennial Census, co-study director of the Panel on Research on Future Census Methods, and program officer for the Panel to Review the 2000 Census. His research interests include quantitative criminology, particularly space-time dynamics in homicide; Bayesian statistics; and statistics in sports. He has a B.S. in statistics from George Washington University and an MS. in statistics and a joint Ph.D. in statistics and public policy from Carnegie Mellon University. Ivan Fellegi is chief statistician of Canada and head of Statistics Canada. In 1992 he was made a member of the Order of Canada and was promoted to officer in 1998. He has served as president of the International Association of Survey Statisticians, the International Statistical Institute, and the Statistical Society of Canada. Besides being an elected member of the International Statistical Institute, he is also a fellow of the Royal Statistical Society and the American Statistical Association. He has provided advice on statistical matters to his native Hungary following its transition to democracy and, in 2004, was awarded the Order of Merit of the Republic of Hungary. He has chaired the Conference of European Statisticians of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe. He has been awarded the Gold Medal by the Statistical Society of Canada and the Robert Schuman medal by the European Community and the Order of Canada. He has published extensively in the areas of census and survey methodology, in particular on consistent editing rules and record linkage. At the National Research Council, he was a member of the Panel on Privacy and Confidentiality as Factors in Survey Response, the Panel on Census Requirements in the Year 2000 and Beyond, and the Panel on Decennial Census Methodology. He has a B.Sc. from the University of Budapest (1956) and an M.Sc. (1958) and a Ph.D. in survey methodology (1961) from Carleton University. Linda Gage is the liaison to demographic programs at the California Department of Finance. She represents California in federal and profession forums and evaluates the effect of various demographic and statistical programs on the state. Previously, she served as the California state demographer for two decades and in other positions in the Department of Finance since 1975. She has served on the U.S. secretary of commerce’s Decennial Advisory Committee since 1995. 94

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At the National Research Council, she was a member of the Panel on a Review of Statistical Issues in the Allocation of Federal and State Program Funds. She has B.A. and M.A. degrees in sociology, with emphasis in demography, from the University of California, Davis. Vijay Nair is the Donald A. Darling professor of statistics and professor of industrial and operations engineering at the University of Michigan. He has been chair of the Statistics Department since 1998. He was a research scientist at Bell Laboratories for 15 years before joining the faculty at Michigan. His area of expertise is engineering statistics, including quality and productivity improvement, experimental design, reliability, and process control. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Statistical Association, and the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He is a former editor of Technometrics and International Statistical Review and has served on many other editorial boards. He is currently the chair of the board of trustees of the National Institute of Statistical Sciences. At the National Research Council, he is a member of the Committee on National Statistics and served on several study panels, including the Panel on Statistical Methods for Testing and Evaluating Defense Systems and the Assessment Panel on NIST’s Information Technology Center, and he chaired the Oversight Committee for the Workshop on Testing for Dynamic Acquisition of Defense Systems. He has a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of California, Berkeley. Jesse Poore holds the Ericsson/Harlan D. Mills chair in software engineering in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Tennessee. He is also director of the University of Tennessee–Oak Ridge National Laboratory Science Alliance, a program to promote and stimulate joint research between those two organizations. He conducts research in cleanroom software engineering and teaches software engineering courses. He has held academic appointments at Florida State University and the Georgia Institute of Technology; he has served as a National Science Foundation rotator, worked in the Executive Office of the President, and was executive director of the Committee on Science and Technology in the U.S. House of Representatives. He is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. At the National Research Council, he was a member of the Panel on Statistical Methods for Testing and Evaluating Defense Systems and the Oversight Committee for the Workshop on Testing for Dynamic Acquisition of Defense Systems. He has a Ph.D. in information and computer science from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Stanley Smith is a professor of economics and director of the Bureau of Economic and Business Research at the University of Florida. He is also director of its population program, which produces the official state and local population estimates and projections for the state of Florida. He is Florida’s representative to the Federal-State Cooperative Program for Population Estimates and Projections and a past president of the Southern Demographic Association. He has also served on the U.S. Census Bureau’s Decennial Advisory Committee. His research interests include the methodology and analysis of population estimates; he has done particular work on the measurement of seasonal populations. At the National Research Council, he was a member of the Panel on Alternative Census Methodologies. He has a B.A. in history from Goshen College and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan (1976). 95

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Roger Tourangeau is director of the Joint Program in Survey Methodology at the University of Maryland and a senior research scientist at the University of Michigan. Previously, he was a senior methodologist at the Gallup Organization, where he designed and selected samples and carried out methodological studies, and founded and directed the Statistics and Methodology Center of the National Opinion Research Center. His research focuses on attitude and opinion measurement and on differences across methods of data collection; he also has extensive experience as an applied sampler and is known for his work on the cognitive aspects of survey methodology. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and has served on the editorial board of Public Opinion Quarterly, as well as on Census Bureau advisory panels. At the National Research Council, he was a member of the Panel on Residence Rules in the Decennial Census. He has a Ph.D. in psychology from Yale University. Nora Cate Schaeffer is professor of sociology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Her areas of expertise include respondent behavior and interviewer-respondent interaction. Her past research has concentrated on a number of different areas in survey methodology dealing with nonsampling error, both nonresponse and response errors of various kinds. She was on the editorial board of Public Opinion Quarterly, Sociological Methodology, and Sociological Methods Research. At the National Research Council, she is a member of the Committee on National Statistics. She has an A.B. from Washington University and a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. Allen Schirm is a senior fellow and associate director at Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. Previously, he was Andrew W. Mellon assistant research scientist and assistant professor at the University of Michigan. His principal research interests include small-area estimation and sample and evaluation design, with application to studies of child well-being and welfare, food and nutrition, and education policy. At the National Research Council, he was a member of the Panel on Research on Future Census Methods, the Panel on Formula Allocations, and the Panel on Estimates of Poverty for Small Geographic Areas. He has an A.B. in statistics from Princeton University and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Pennsylvania. Judith A. Seltzer is professor of sociology at the University of California, Los Angeles. Previously, she was on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin, where she contributed to the development and implementation of the National Survey of Families and Households. Her research interests include kinship patterns, intergenerational obligations, relationships between nonresident fathers and children, and how legal institutions and other policies affect family change. As part of a cross-university consortium of researchers, she is developing new models for explaining family change and variation, in which family dynamics and residence patterns will be important components. She has also participated in the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey. She has collaborated on research to improve the quality of data on children's living arrangements, transfers, and contact with nonresident parents using information from surveys and administrative data. At the National Research Council, she was a member of the Panel on Residence Rules in the Decennial Census. She has master's and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from the University of Michigan. Kirk Wolter is senior fellow and director of the Center for Excellence in Survey Research at the National Opinion Research Center, where he has also served as senior vice president for statistics 96

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and methodology. He is also professor of statistics, part time, at the University of Chicago. During his career, he has led or participated in the design of many of America’s largest information systems, including the Current Business Surveys, the Current Employment Statistics program, the Current Population Survey, the 1980 and 1990 decennial censuses, the National 1997 Longitudinal Survey of Youth, and the National Resources Inventory. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, an elected member of the International Statistical Institute, and past president of the International Association of Survey Statisticians and of the Survey Research Methods section of the American Statistical Association. At the National Research Council, he was a member of the Panel on Conceptual, Measurement, and Other Statistical Issues in Developing Cost of Living Indexes and is currently a member of the Panel on Measuring Business Formation, Dynamics, and Performance. He has an M.A. and a Ph.D. in statistics, both from Iowa State University. 97

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