APPENDIX B
Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

SOROOSH SOROOSHIAN (Chair) is distinguished professor of civil and environmental engineering and of earth system science at the University of California, Irvine. His research focuses on surface hydrology, primarily in the area of rainfall-runoff modeling. He has devoted much of his effort to model identification and calibration issues and has developed special estimation criteria to account for the uncertainties of calibration data. He also consults on problems related to surface hydrology and flood forecasting. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and has been a member of several NRC committees. He is currently chair of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Panel. He has a B.S. in mechanical engineering and an M.S. in operations research from California Polytechnic State University and a Ph.D. in systems engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles.


KIRSTIN DOW is associate professor in the Department of Geography at the University of South Carolina. She is also a senior research fellow at the Stockholm Environmental Institute, where she serves on the Advisory Committee on the Poverty and Vulnerability Program. Her areas of interest include environmental change, hazards and vulnerability, climate risks and decision making, and environmental justice. Her research projects address vulnerability and decision making with respect to climate variability, climate change, and water resources. She has authored and coauthored many journal articles and book chapters along with peer and book reviews. In 2005 she was awarded the Zayed prize for scientific and technical achievement. She has M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in geography from Clark University.


JOHN A. DRACUP is professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. Previously he served on the faculty of the University of California, Los Angeles. His research interests include hydroclimatology; analysis of large-scale water resource systems and hydrologic and environmental systems; engineering economics of water resources systems; and surface water hydrology. He served as lieutenant with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers from 1957 to 1958. He has a B.S. from the University of Washington an M.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley.


LISA GODDARD is a research scientist at the International Research Institute for Climate and Society. She has been working for the International Research Institute (IRI) at Columbia University since 1995, developing and improving IRI’s climate forecasts. Her research interests are aimed at improving the quality and content of seasonal climate predictions. This goal is approached with a focus on climate diagnostics and climate predictability. Research areas include El Niño/La Niña and their impact on climate variability and predictability; methodologies for identifying the relative importance of regional SSTs to regional climate variability; and, assessment of climate prediction tools. She has a B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley, an M.A. from Princeton University, and a Ph.D. in atmospheric and oceanic sciences from Princeton University.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 44
APPENDIX B Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff SOROOSH SOROOSHIAN (Chair) is distinguished professor of civil and environmental engineering and of earth system science at the University of California, Irvine. His research focuses on surface hydrology, primarily in the area of rainfall-runoff modeling. He has devoted much of his effort to model identification and calibration issues and has developed special estimation criteria to account for the uncertainties of calibration data. He also consults on problems related to surface hydrology and flood forecasting. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and has been a member of several NRC committees. He is currently chair of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Panel. He has a B.S. in mechanical engineering and an M.S. in operations research from California Polytechnic State University and a Ph.D. in systems engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles. KIRSTIN DOW is associate professor in the Department of Geography at the University of South Carolina. She is also a senior research fellow at the Stockholm Environmental Institute, where she serves on the Advisory Committee on the Poverty and Vulnerability Program. Her areas of interest include environmental change, hazards and vulnerability, climate risks and decision making, and environmental justice. Her research projects address vulnerability and decision making with respect to climate variability, climate change, and water resources. She has authored and coauthored many journal articles and book chapters along with peer and book reviews. In 2005 she was awarded the Zayed prize for scientific and technical achievement. She has M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in geography from Clark University. JOHN A. DRACUP is professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. Previously he served on the faculty of the University of California, Los Angeles. His research interests include hydroclimatology; analysis of large-scale water resource systems and hydrologic and environmental systems; engineering economics of water resources systems; and surface water hydrology. He served as lieutenant with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers from 1957 to 1958. He has a B.S. from the University of Washington an M.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. LISA GODDARD is a research scientist at the International Research Institute for Climate and Society. She has been working for the International Research Institute (IRI) at Columbia University since 1995, developing and improving IRI’s climate forecasts. Her research interests are aimed at improving the quality and content of seasonal climate predictions. This goal is approached with a focus on climate diagnostics and climate predictability. Research areas include El Niño/La Niña and their impact on climate variability and predictability; methodologies for identifying the relative importance of regional SSTs to regional climate variability; and, assessment of climate prediction tools. She has a B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley, an M.A. from Princeton University, and a Ph.D. in atmospheric and oceanic sciences from Princeton University. 44

OCR for page 44
MICHAEL HANEMANN is professor of agricultural and resource economics at the University of California, Berkeley. His research interests include nonmarket valuation, environmental economics and policy, water pricing and management, demand modeling for market research and policy design, the economics of irreversibility and adaptive management, and welfare economics. His current project focuses on testing and calibrating the measurement of nonmarket values for oil spills via the contingent valuation method. He has an M.A. in public finance and decision theory and a Ph.D. in economics, both from Harvard University. DENISE LACH is associate professor in the Department of Sociology at Oregon State University. Her research interests include examination of changing roles and expectations for science and scientists in natural resource decision making, acceptability of bioremediation technology for cleanup of radionuclides and heavy metals, and institutional resistance to change, including the nonuse of climate forecasts by water managers, in the water sector. She has M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from the University of Oregon and a B.S. degree in English/education from the University of Minnesota. DOUG PLASENCIA is vice president and Western U.S. water resources practice leader for Michael Baker, Jr., Inc., based in Phoenix, Arizona. He has over 22 years of experience in the field of floodplain management and storm water management working for public agencies, most recently as a consulting engineer in Arizona, Nevada, and Virginia. He develops watershed and river-based plans that integrate technology, policy, and implementation into long-term management strategies. He has participated in evaluations of the effectiveness of the 1 percent flood standard for the Federal Emergency Management Administration, served on an independent peer review of the hurricane protection system in New Orleans for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and has written on or participated in the development of national floodplain management policy. He was also a hydrologist with the Flood Control District of Maricopa County, Phoenix, Arizona, and was chief of flood protection for Virginia’s Department of Conservation and Recreation. He has a B.S. degree in forest resource management from the University of Minnesota and an M.S. degree in watershed management from the University of Arizona. PAUL C. STERN (Study Director) is a principal staff officer at the National Research Council and director of its standing Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change. His research interests include the determinants of environmentally significant behavior, participatory processes for informing environmental decision making, and the governance of environmental resources and risks. He is coauthor of the textbook Environmental Problems and Human Behavior and coeditor of numerous National Research Council publications, including Decision Making for the Environment: Social and Behavioral Science Priorities (2005), The Drama of the Commons (2002), Making Climate Forecasts Matter (1999), and Understanding Risk (1996). His coauthored Science article “The Struggle to Govern the Commons,” won the 2005 Sustainability Science Award from the Ecological Society of America. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Psychological Association. He holds a B.A. degree from Amherst College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Clark University, all in psychology. 45

OCR for page 44
JENNIFER F. BREWER (Staff Officer) is a Program Officer at the National Research Council. Her research has focused on natural resource institutions and policies, and models of environmental governance, especially in marine fisheries. She has worked in public, private, and non-profit sectors, including a John A. Knauss fellowship in the U.S. House of Representatives. She holds a B.A. from the University of Michigan, a M.S. in marine policy from the University of Maine, and a Ph.D. in geography from Clark University. 46