Janet L. Lauritsen is professor of criminology and criminal justice at the University of Missouri–St Louis. Much of her research is focused on understanding individual, family, and neighborhood sources of violent victimization as well as race and ethnic differences in violence. She served as chairperson of the American Statistical Association Committee on Law and Justice Statistics from 2004–2006 and as visiting research fellow at the Bureau of Justice Statistics from 2002 to 2006. During her fellowship, she assembled two expert meetings on major options for the National Crime Victimization Survey, several of the participants of which are also members of this panel. She currently serves on the editorial boards of Criminology and the Journal of Quantitative Criminology and on the executive board of the American Society of Criminology. She has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.


Colin Loftin is co-director of the Violence Research Group, a research collaboration with colleagues at the University at Albany and the University of Maryland that conducts research on the causes and consequences of interpersonal violence. The major themes of the research are (1) understanding violence as a social process extending beyond individual action, (2) improving the quality of data on the incidence and nature of crime, (3) the design and evaluation of violence prevention policies, and (4) the investigation of population risk factors for violence. The Violence Research Group published the Statistical Handbook on Violence in America. Apast member of the National Research Council’s Committee on Law and Justice, he previously served on the Panel on Understanding and Preventing Violence. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of North Carolina.


James P. Lynch is distinguished professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York. At the Bureau of Social Science Research in the 1980s, he served as manager of the National Crime Survey redesign effort for the bureau. He became a faculty member in the Department of Justice, Law and Society at American University in 1986, where he remained as associate professor, full professor, and chair of the department until leaving for John Jay in 2005. He has published 3 books, 25 refereed articles, and over 40 book chapters and other publications. He was elected to the executive board of the American Society of Criminology in 2002 and has served on the editorial boards of Criminology and the Journal of Quantitative Criminology and as deputy editor of Justice Quarterly. He has also chaired the American Statistical Association’s Committee on Law and Justice Statistics. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago.



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