FIGURE 5.8 Estimated supply of gasoline and diesel produced by thermochemical conversion via Fischer-Tropsch, with or without CCS, at different price points in 2020.

FIGURE 5.8 Estimated supply of gasoline and diesel produced by thermochemical conversion via Fischer-Tropsch, with or without CCS, at different price points in 2020.

shows potential supply and not the committee’s projected penetration of cellulosic ethanol in 2020. This is because it does not incorporate lags in implementation of the technology that will result because of the time required to obtain permits for and build the infrastructure to produce and transport these alternative liquid fuels. The estimated supply of synthetic gasoline and diesel derived from coal and biomass as feedstocks is shown in Figure 5.8. Two different supply functions are plotted, one with CCS and the other without CCS. They show that if the CCS technologies are viable and a price of $50 per tonne of CO2 is implemented, then for each feedstock it will be less costly to use CCS than to release the CO2 into the atmosphere.

Either of the production processes underlying Figures 5.7 or 5.8 would use the same supplies of biomass. Therefore the quantities cannot be added. If all of the production (in addition to ethanol produced from corn grain) were based on cellulosic conversion, the quantities shown in Figure 5.7 would be applicable. If all production were based on thermochemical conversion co-fed with biomass and coal, then the quantities shown in Figure 5.8 would be applicable. Most likely, some of the production would be based on cellulosic processes and some based



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