FIGURE 7.4 Total estimated plant cost in 2007 dollars for three types of power plantsPC, IGCC, and NGCCwith and without CCS. These estimates, like those for other technologies, do not necessarily include all of the site-specific costs of building a plant nor all of the real-world contingencies that may be needed depending on economic conditions (see Box 7.2 for more discussion).

FIGURE 7.4 Total estimated plant cost in 2007 dollars for three types of power plants—PC, IGCC, and NGCC—with and without CCS. These estimates, like those for other technologies, do not necessarily include all of the site-specific costs of building a plant nor all of the real-world contingencies that may be needed depending on economic conditions (see Box 7.2 for more discussion).

Note: V refers to CO2vented.

Source: Princeton Environmental Institute.

done in the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) (NETL, 2007a).21 The analysis describes the cost of building an “Nth plant,” constructed after the large uncertainties in performance of plant components and systems have been resolved through experience. The cost of the Nth

21

Capital costs for the components of natural gas and coal power plants in the NETL report were adopted by PEI without change, except for escalating capital costs from the end of 2006 to mid-2007. PEI then modified NETL results by using different financing assumptions (see Elecric Power Research Institute—Technical Assessment Guide [EPRI-TAG], 1993), using different operation and maintenance (O&M) assumptions, and including the CO2 “overheads” (emissions upstream of power plants due to coal handling and transport, for example) reported in Argonne National Laboratory’s GREET model (Argonne National Laboratory, 2008).



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