FIGURE 7.6 The effect of a $50/tonne price of CO2 on the LCOE of power plants. IGCC-CCS becomes the cheapest coal option, while the competitiveness of NGCC remains sensitive to fuel price. These estimates, like those for other technologies, do not necessarily include all of the site-specific costs of building a plant nor all of the real-world contingencies that may be needed depending on economic conditions (see Box 7.2 for more discussion).

FIGURE 7.6 The effect of a $50/tonne price of CO2on the LCOE of power plants. IGCC-CCS becomes the cheapest coal option, while the competitiveness of NGCC remains sensitive to fuel price. These estimates, like those for other technologies, do not necessarily include all of the site-specific costs of building a plant nor all of the real-world contingencies that may be needed depending on economic conditions (see Box 7.2 for more discussion).

Source: Princeton Environmental Institute.

Although non-CO2-capture PC and NGCC cases represent well-developed commercial technologies that have already reached the Nth plant level, the

among reported cost estimates). Midpoint LCOE estimates in Figure 7.5 may be low by comparison to costs based on the higher overall plant costs by 10 to 30 percent. (The percentages are different for the LCOE numbers, because (1) capital costs contribute only 80 percent or less to LCOE, and (2) a net 10 percent increase has already been added to LCOE as a result of the asymmetric range assigned to the uncertainty in the Nth plant and other assumptions.) It should be borne in mind when comparing the plant costs in Figure 7.4 to publicly quoted cost estimates for specific plants that the AEF figures do not assume any escalation above inflation during planning and construction. Other estimates often do so.



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