FIGURE 7.14 Supply curve for geologic storage of CO2. Net CCS costs shown include the costs of capture, transportation, and subsurface injection. See Figure 7.A.6 in Annex 7.A for a breakdown of these costs into four components: capture, compression, transport, and injection.

FIGURE 7.14 Supply curve for geologic storage of CO2. Net CCS costs shown include the costs of capture, transportation, and subsurface injection. See Figure 7.A.6 in Annex 7.A for a breakdown of these costs into four components: capture, compression, transport, and injection.

Note: ECBM = enhanced coal bed methane; EOR = enhanced oil recovery.

Source: Dooley et al., 2006.

Significant expansion of domestic oil production via enhanced oil recovery could result from a price on CO2. At least for light oils, CO2 is the fluid of choice for EOR, but until now the level of EOR activity has been constrained by the availability of low-cost CO2. If CO2 emissions are constrained, EOR will be an attractive market for CO2, as most of the CO2 it uses will remain underground. Widespread realization of CO2 capture opportunities will be required, along with an infrastructure of CO2 pipelines.



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