information about the costs and benefits of available energy efficiency technologies. Most consumers are unwilling or ill equipped to do so (see Box 2.2).

Overcoming these barriers will require a judicious mix of policies, regulations, and market incentives. A full analysis of the barriers, as well as of the means to overcome them, is beyond the scope of this AEF Phase I study. The National Academies will address many of these issues, however, in the project’s Phase II.

REFERENCES

Brown, R., S. Borgeson, J. Koomey, and P. Bremayer. 2008. U.S. Building-Sector Energy Efficiency Potential. Berkeley, Calif.: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

EIA (Energy Information Administration). 2008. Annual Energy Outlook 2008. DOE/EIA-0383(2008). Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration.

EIA. 2009a. Annual Energy Outlook 2009. DOE/EIA-0383(2009). Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration.

EIA. 2009b. Annual Energy Review 2008. DOE/EIA-0384(2008). Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration.

NAS-NAE-NRC (National Academy of Sciences-National Academy of Engineering-National Research Council). 2009a. Electricity from Renewable Resources: Status, Prospects, and Impediments. Washington, D.C.: The National Academies Press.

NAS-NAE-NRC. 2009b. Liquid Transportation Fuels from Coal and Biomass: Technological Status, Costs, and Environmental Impacts. Washington, D.C.: The National Academies Press.

National Research Council. 2008. Transitions to Alternative Transportation Technologies—A Focus on Hydrogen. Washington, D.C.: The National Academies Press.



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