Appendix B
Biographies of Speakers*

RUDY AERNOUDT

Rudy Aernoudt has studied economy and philosophy at the University of Leuven and holds a master’s degree in European economics from the College of Europe. After a career as corporate manager in the banking sector, he became principal administrator at the European Commission dealing with enterprise policy, in particular the financing of European enterprises. He was special adviser to the Belgian President of the Industry Council during the Belgian Presidency of the European Union before becoming deputy head of cabinet to the Walloon minister of economics, dealing with research, entrepreneurship, and financing. Afterwards he became director of cabinet to the federal minister of economics, energy, external trade, and scientific policy. From 2004 onwards, he became chief of staff (head of cabinet) to the Flemish vice-president and minister of economy, enterprises, science, and international trade. From September 1, 2006, to September 16, 2007, he was secretary general of the Department of Economics, Science, and Innovation of the Flemish Government.

Rudy Aernoudt is also professor in corporate finance at the business schools of Brussels and Ghent and the European University of Nancy. He is the author of 20 books and over 150 articles on the topics of finance and politics. He is a member of the editorial boards of Venture Capital, an international journal of entrepreneurial finance, Financial Management, and Entrepreneurial and Business

*

As of September 2006.



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Appendix B Biographies of Speakers* RUDY AERNOUDT Rudy Aernoudt has studied economy and philosophy at the University of Leuven and holds a master’s degree in European economics from the College of Europe. After a career as corporate manager in the banking sector, he became principal administrator at the European Commission dealing with enterprise policy, in particular the financing of European enterprises. He was special adviser to the Belgian President of the Industry Council during the Belgian Presidency of the European Union before becoming deputy head of cabinet to the Walloon minister of economics, dealing with research, entrepreneurship, and financing. Afterwards he became director of cabinet to the federal minister of economics, energy, external trade, and scientific policy. From 2004 onwards, he became chief of staff (head of cabinet) to the Flemish vice-president and minister of economy, enterprises, science, and international trade. From September 1, 2006, to Septem- ber 16, 2007, he was secretary general of the Department of Economics, Science, and Innovation of the Flemish Government. Rudy Aernoudt is also professor in corporate finance at the business schools of Brussels and Ghent and the European University of Nancy. He is the author of 20 books and over 150 articles on the topics of finance and politics. He is a mem- ber of the editorial boards of Venture Capital, an international journal of entre- preneurial finance, Financial Management, and Entrepreneurial and Business *As of September 2006. 1

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1 APPENDIX B Angel Financing. He is a speaker at numerous conferences organized by different institutions such as the United Nations, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, University of Antwerp Management School, European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association, Vlerick Management School, Sorbonne II, the European Parliament, AECM (Association Européenne du Cautionnement Mutuel), European Business Angel Network, Wall Street Journal Entrepreneur- ship Summit, Wirtschafts symposium, European Business School, and the Belgian Venture Capital Academy. He was the responsible organiser of the yearly Euro- pean symposium on financing in Louvain-Ia-Neuve, gathering over 3,000 partici- pants, and is a member of the boards of different enterprises. ERWIN ANNYS Erwin Annys obtained his Ph.D. in chemistry at the University of Gent. After 16 years in the chemical industry as well in a multinational as in a medium- sized company, he started working at Fedichem, the Federation of the Belgian Chemical Industries, where he is responsible for product and innovation policy with activities on the Flemish, Belgian, and European levels. He is a member of the European Chemical Industry Council Innovation Planning Group, SusChem, and the board of the Belgian Normalisation, and he is the author of a book on REACH, the coming European legislation on chemicals. R. ALLEN BOWLING Allen Bowling is TI Fellow and manager of external research for Texas Instruments’ Silicon Technology Development (SiTD) group in Dallas, Texas. Allen coordinates SiTD’s involvement in external research in the area of sili- con process/materials/devices technology, including SEMATECH, International SEMATECH Manufacturing Initiative (ISMI), Semiconductor Research Corpora- tion (SRC), IMEC, and various university research programs. Dr. Bowling currently represents Texas Instruments (TI) on the following advisory groups: (1) SEMATECH Executive Steering Council, (2) ISMI Execu- tive Advisory Council, (3), SRC Executive Technical Advisory Board, (4) SRC Nanomanufacturing Science Area Coordinating Committee, (5) IMEC Operations Review Meeting group, and (6) University of Arizona ESH Research Center, with which he serves as chair of the Executive Advisory Council. Dr. Bowling completed his Ph.D. in chemistry in 1979 at the University of Tennessee. He held an Alexander von Humboldt research fellowship from 1979 to 1980 at the University of Frankfurt, Germany. He joined TI in 1980 as a pro- cess control engineer in the TI Dallas MOS-2 wafer fab. From 1982 to 1987, he was a member of the Technical Staff in the TI Central Research Labs, Materials Science Laboratory. His research focused on particulate contamination control, wafer cleaning, and process control in semiconductor process technology. He and

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10 APPENDIX B Graydon Larrabee did the research leading up to the TI Microelectronics Manu- facturing Science and Technology (MMST) program on single-wafer processing for flexible manufacturing, administered by the Office of Naval Research and the U.S. Air Force. In 1987, he was elected TI Senior Member of the Technical Staff. From 1987 to 1997, he was a manager for process development in TI’s Semiconductor Process and Device Center (SPDC). From 1997 to 2001, he was a manager for process development in TI SiTD. Dr. Bowling moved to his role as SiTD Manager of External Research in November 2001. In 2002, Allen was elected TI Fellow, one of 67 TI Fellows currently within TI. KOENRAAD DEBACKERE Koenraad Debackere has been with K.U.Leuven since 1995. He obtained his master degrees in electromechanical engineering (1984) and management sciences (1985) and his Ph.D. degree in management with an ICM-fellowship at the University of Gent (1990), after stays as an ICM-fellow (1988-1989) and an ICRMOT research assistant (1990) at MIT Sloan School of Management. He was a Fulbright-Hays postdoctoral fellow at MIT from 1991 to 1992. In 1992, he became an assistant professor at Erasmus University Rotterdam and an NFWO- postdoctoral researcher in 1993. In 1995, he became professor at K.U.Leuven where he teaches technology and innovation management. In 1993, 1995, and 1997, Koenraad Debackere won Best Research Paper Awards from the American Academy of Management and the Decision Sciences Institute. His research has focused on the area of technology and innovation management and policy, the development of indicators for measuring the link- age between science and technology, the design and use of bibliometric indica- tors for science policy purposes and the role of entrepreneurial universities in economic development. He has published over 150 articles and book chapters in this field. Publications have appeared in Research Policy, Scientometrics, Journal of Product Innoation Management, R&D Management, Technoation, Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Journal of the American Society for Information Science, Small Business Economics, Proceedings of the Ameri- can Academy of Management, International Journal of Management Reiews, EMBO Reports, Research Ealuation, The Economics of Innoation and New Technology, International Journal of Technology Management, Journal of High Technology, Management Research, Creatiity and Innoation Management, The Journal of Technology Transfer, and Research Technology Management. Koenraad Debackere has also been an invited professor in the area of innova- tion management in various academic programs (Manchester Business School, Insead, Milano Politechnico, Tilburg University, and Chalmers University). He has been a promotor and recipient of various research grants by The Institute for the Promotion of Innovation by Science and Technology in Flanders (IWT), Research Foundation—Flanders (FWO), DWTC (Belgium), and the European

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11 APPENDIX B Commission. He is promoter of “Steunpunt O&O Statistieken” of the Flemish government at K.U.Leuven. Koenraad Debackere is also actively engaged in technology transfer activities as managing director of K.U.Leuven research and development and chairman of Gemma Frisius Fonds (the venture fund) of the K.U.Leuven. He is the co-founder and chairman of Leuven, lnc., the innovation network of Leuven high-tech entre- preneurs. He is a board member of IWT-Vlaanderen, the Flemish government agency that supports science and technology development in Flemish industry. Since 2003 he has been member of the board of K.U.Leuven, and since 2005 he has been the general manager of K.U.Leuven. PAUL DUCHEYNE Paul Ducheyne is professor of bioengineering, professor of orthopedic sur- gery research, and professor of biomaterials in dentistry at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. He also is the director of the Center for Bioactive Materials and Tissue Engineering at this university. Paul Ducheyne, a native of Belgium, went through his secondary school years in the latin-mathematics-humanities as primus perpetuus. Upon graduation in 1967, he attended the Catholic University of Leuven, where he obtained an engineering degree in materials science and engineering in 1972 and a Ph.D. in 1976. Paul Ducheyne is generally considered a leader in biomaterials and tissue engineering. He has organized a number of symposia and meetings, such as the Fourth European Conference on Biomaterials (1983), the Engineering Foundation Conference on Bioceramics (1986), which led to the New York Academy of Sci- ences publication, Bioceramics, Material Characteristics Versus In Vio Behaior, and the Sixth International Symposium on Ceramics in Medicine (1993). He has lectured around the world and served on the editorial board of ten scientific jour- nals in the biomaterials, bioceramics, bioengineering, tissue engineering, ortho- pedics, and dental fields. He has authored more than 280 papers and chapters in a variety of international journals and books and he has edited ten books. When last quantified (December 2004), his number of citations was an average of 160 per year over his career with a maximum of 580 in 1992. Paul Ducheyne has been secretary of the European Society for Biomaterials (1980-1983) and presi- dent of the Society for Biomaterials (USA) (1994-1995). During his tenure as president, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) moved forward with the orga- nization of the workshop on “Biomaterials and Medical Implant Science—Future Directions.” He is also past president of the International Society for Ceramics in Medicine (1993) and currently is a member of its board of directors. He has been the first Nanyang Visiting Professor at the Nanyang Institute of Technology, Singapore (1999-2000), and is a member of the International Advisory Board to the EEC program on Tissue Engineering (2004-present) involving 14 European

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12 APPENDIX B countries. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, and the International Association of Biomaterials Societies. Paul Ducheyne obtained his Ph.D. on a thesis entitled “Metallic Orthopae- dic Implants with a Porous Coating” in 1976. With fellowships from the NIH (International Postdoctoral Fellowship) and the Belgian American Educational Foundation (Honorary Fellowship), he performed postdoctoral research at the University of Florida (the Laboratory of Bioceramics and the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery). It was at the University of Florida that he began his research on bioactive ceramics. He first presented his seminal work on the use of hydroxyapatite coatings on porous materials for enhancing fixation to bone in 1977. This concept is now used worldwide in orthopedic clinical care. Paul Ducheyne started his career in Europe, specifically at his alma mater, the Catholic University of Leuven. He created the now highly successful post- graduate program in bioengineering in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Among the four co-founders was the previous president of this Uni- versity, Professor A. Oosterlinck. In those initial years, he was also chairman- founder of the chapter on biomedical engineering of the Belgian Engineering Society (Flemish section) and director of Meditek, the Flemish government body created to promote Academia to Industry Technology Transfer in the area of biomedical engineering. Dr. Ducheyne joined the University of Pennsylvania in 1983. From 1991 to 1994 he was chair of the university’s graduate group in bioengineering, the then largest Ph.D. program in bioengineering in the United States. As graduate group chair, he focused on enhancing the overall quality of the graduate student body and the competitiveness of the university’s fellowships in bioengineering. He also initiated the programmatic changes that led to the formulation of tracks in bioengineering. Paul Ducheyne directs a research program with research personnel that have come from all parts of the world. Support for his work has come from federal agencies (National Science Foundation [NSF]), NIH, Veterans Administration, NASA, and DARPA) and industry. His laboratory is currently funded by NIH grants, including a Bioengineering Research Partnership grant, and grants from DARPA and the Pennsylvania Nanotechnology Institute. His proposals have fre- quently drawn outstanding reviews, as can be witnessed by the 0.2 percentile on an NIH proposal, the first ranking in NSF competition, or the size of a 1980 grant from a leading U.S. corporation to his laboratory when still in Europe. His pro- gram has active collaborations with several overseas institutions. Notable is his collaboration with Professor Gutmanas at the Technion, Israel, and the repeated support from the Binational Science Foundation, Israel. Paul Ducheyne’s work led to a number of firsts and to concepts now used in industry. A number of patents followed from his work and, over the years, led to many collaborations with leading medical device companies. He also assisted

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1 APPENDIX B corporations in the review of legal proceedings and their technical merit. As such he was expert witness in many high-visibility cases, most notably the porous coat- ing patent litigation of the second half of the 1980s, the temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) litigation which instigated the Biomaterials Availability Act, the breast implant controversy, and the pedicle screw dossier. Since 1990, all technologies coming from his lab were withheld from licens- ing to existing companies. These patents formed the wealth of technology at the basis of Orthovita (NASDAQ: VITA), a corporation founded in 1992 with offices in the Philadelphia area and operations in the United States and Belgium. Paul Ducheyne attracted Orthovita’s top-level management, and he served as chairman of the board until 1999 and director until 2003. From 2001 to 2002, Paul Ducheyne was on leave from academia and directed the start-up phase of Gentis, Inc., Philadelphia. Gentis, Inc. is now well under way to becoming the leader in treating low back pain resulting from degenerating intervertebral discs. This condition is highly prevalent already in a middle-aged population, and leads to the largest number of sick days in our Western societies. A minimally invasive procedure has been designed that will enable resolution of pain, quick regain of function and, in general, postponement of disease progres- sion and major spine fusion surgery. KENNETH S. FLAMM Kenneth S. Flamm is professor and Dean Rusk Chair in International Affairs at the Lyndon Baines Johnson School (LBJ School) of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin. He is a 1973 honors graduate of Stanford Univer- sity and received a Ph.D. in economics from MIT in 1979. From 1993 to 1995, Dr. Flamm served as Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Eco- nomic Security and special assistant to the Deputy Secretary of Defense for Dual Use Technology Policy. Prior to and after his service at the Defense Department, he spent 11 years as a senior fellow in the Foreign Policy Studies Program at the Brookings Institution. Dr. Flamm has been a professor of economics at the Insti- tuto Tecnológico A. de México in Mexico City, the University of Massachusetts, and George Washington University. Dr. Flamm currently directs the LBJ School’s Technology and Public Policy Program and directs externally funded research projects on “Internet Use in Developing and Industrializing Countries,” “The Economics of Fair Use,” and “Determinants of Internet Use in U.S. Households,” and has recently initiated a new project on “Exploring the Digital Divide: Regional Differences in Patterns of Internet Use in the U.S.” He continues to work with the semiconductor industry research consortium, International SEMATECH, and is building a return-on- investment-based prototype to add economic logic to SEMATECH’s industry investment model. He also is a member of the National Research Council’s Committees on the Future of Supercomputing, Measuring and Sustaining the

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1 APPENDIX B New Economy, and Comparative Innovation Policy. He has served as member and chair of the NATO Science Committee’s Panel for Science and Technology Policy and Organization, and as a member of the Federal Networking Council Advisory Committee, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Develop- ment Expert Working Party on High Performance Computers and Communica- tions, and various advisory committees and study groups of the National Science Foundation, the Council on Foreign Relations, the Defense Science Board, and the U.S. Congress’ Office of Technology Assessment, and as a consultant to gov- ernment agencies, international organizations, and private corporations. Dr. Flamm is the author of numerous articles and books on the economic impacts of technological innovation in a variety of high-technology industries. Among the latter are Mismanaged Trade? Strategic Policy and the Semiconductor Industry (1996), Changing the Rules: Technological Change, International Com- petition, and Regulation in Communications (ed., with Robert Crandell, 1989), Creating the Computer (1988), and Targeting the Computer (1987). Recent work by Dr. Flamm has focused on measurement of the economic impact of the semi- conductor industry on the U.S. economy, analyzing the economic determinants of Internet use by households, and assessing the economic impacts of Internet use in key applications. MARY L. GOOD Mary L. Good is the Donaghey University Professor at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, and serves as dean for the College of Information Science and Systems Engineering. She is managing member for the Fund for Arkansas’ Future, LLC (an investment fund for startup and early-stage com- panies), past president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, past president of the American Chemical Society, and an elected member of the National Academy of Engineering. She presently serves on the Boards of BiogenIdec, Inc., and Acxiom, Inc. Previously Dr. Good served a 4-year term as the under secretary for tech- nology for the Technology Administration in the Department of Commerce, a presidentially appointed, Senate confirmed, position. In addition, she chaired the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on Technological Innovation (NSTC/CTI), and served on the NSTC Committee on National Secu- rity. Previously she has served as the senior vice president for Technology for Allied Signal and as the Boyd Professor of Chemistry and Materials Science at Louisiana State University. Dr. Good was appointed to the National Science Board by President Carter in 1980 and by President Reagan in 1986. She was the chair of that board from 1988 to 1991, when she received an appointment by President Bush to be a member of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology.

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1 APPENDIX B Mary Good has received many awards, including the National Science Foun- dation’s Distinguished Public Service Award, the American Institute of Chemists’ Gold Medal, the Priestly Medal from the American Chemical Society, and the Vannevar Bush Award from the National Science Board, among others. Dr. Good received her bachelor’s degree in chemistry from the University of Central Arkansas and her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in inorganic chemistry from the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville. RANDAL GOODALL Randal Goodall is the director of external programs at SEMATECH in Austin, Texas, a consortium of the world’s leading computer chip makers. His career has combined scientific research, technology development, systems engi- neering, and new business and funding development. Dr. Goodall received his bachelor of science in physics from Caltech (1977) and his master’s degree (1979) and Ph.D. degree (1984) from the University of Oregon in experimental solid-state physics, studying the Quantum Hall Effect in semiconductor devices. After graduation he transferred skills developed in labora- tory automation to lead the product development efforts of an advanced software applications startup as director of engineering. In 1987 Dr. Goodall joined ADE in Boston, a leading producer of advanced measurement systems for the semiconductor industry. He formed the Systems Technology Group to identify and develop next generation micro- and nanoscale measurement technologies, system architectures, and computational applications. In early 1994, Dr. Goodall joined SEMATECH as a senior member of the Technical Staff in the Silicon Materials Group working on the world’s earli- est 300mm wafer materials and equipment development efforts. In late 1995, Dr. Goodall was one of six members of the startup team for the International 300mm Initiative (I300I), leading the Enabling Technologies division, includ- ing the silicon wafer, metrology, standards, and productivity programs. In 1998, the I300I programs merged with International SEMATECH, and in 2000, he was named associate director of a new $13 million Manufacturing Methods and Productivity division, focusing on productivity for existing and future fabs and equipment. He spear-headed efforts in global technology collaboration and stan- dardization, including invention of a novel new computational model of the entire industry to support R&D “what if” analysis. He participated in the formation of a new manufacturing R&D subsidiary to offer these programs more broadly. Beginning in 2001 on special assignment to the Office of the Chief Execu- tive, Dr. Goodall worked to secure $200 million of leveraged funding for the Albany Extreme Ultraviolet patterning program. In 2002, he co-developed the Texas Technology Initiative (TTI), a comprehensive technology-based economic development platform, which enabled a proactive funding response by the State of Texas. He worked with the Texas governor and other state and local officials

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1 APPENDIX B to pass $295 million 2003 legislation which enabled funding for SEMATECH and university programs through a new Advanced Materials Research Center (AMRC), spanning semiconductor, biotechnology, nanotechnology, MEMS, and advanced energy. Acting as technology coordinator, Dr. Goodall managed the 2004 formation of AMRC, which continues to perform coordinated industry- university R&D, and the new Advanced Processing and Prototyping Center (AP2C), funded by DARPA, which provides R&D infrastructure for emerging technologies. As the first director of the newly formed SEMATECH External Programs office, he provided leadership in 2005 for the TTI, the State Strategy on Advanced Technology, and the definition and passage of the $200 million Texas Emerging Technology Fund legislation. Dr. Goodall has been engaged in the most dynamic components of SEMATECH’s evolution for more than 12 years. He continues to work with local, state, and national government efforts to drive technology innovation and economic development, and he partners with technology leaders, university administrators and researchers, and state officials to develop mechanisms for co-leveraging the semiconductor infrastructure of SEMATECH/ATDF and the nanofabrication needs of emerging technologies. He is a leader in the new Texas Alliance for Nanoelectronics. Dr. Goodall has published dozens of scientific and technical papers on solid- state physics, silicon wafer technology, R&D collaboration, industry technology transitions, including 300mm wafers, and productivity modeling. FIENTJE MOERMAN Fientje Moerman is the vice minister-president of the Flemish Government and Flemish minister for Economy, Enterprise, Science, Innovation and Foreign Trade, a post she has held since 2004. She received her law degree from the Uni- versity of Ghent (honors), specializing in tax and economic law, and completed a master of law degree at Harvard Law School, where she was a Fulbright Scholar. In 1983, she completed the New York State Bar exam. From 1982 to 1984, Fientje Moerman was a lawyer at the firm of Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen & Hamilton in New York and Brussels. She then took a position as deputy editor for economics and finance at the Standaard. From 1985 to 1989, she served as spokesperson for the Liberals and Democrats at the European Par- liament, and in 1989 she took a position as adviser to the president of France, Valéry Giscard d’Estaing, a post she held until 1991. She then served as chief adviser for institutional reforms and relations with Israel and the Gulf States from 1991 to 1995. Fientje Moerman is a member of the Party Executive Committee of the Flemish Liberals (PVV, now VLD), in which capacity she has served from 1991 to 1993 and again from 1997 to the present. She is a member of the Flemish Liberal Students Association (LVSV) and of the Council of European Liberals

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17 APPENDIX B (ELDR) and is chairperson of “Politiek Konvent,” the umbrella organization of political groupings at the University of Ghent. She served as municipal councilor for the City of Ghent from 1988 to 1995 and vice mayor for education for that city from 1995 to 1999. Minister Moermann served as a member of parliament from 1999 to 2003, holding the post of secretary-general of the VLD. In 2003, she became minister for Economy, Energy, Foreign Trade and Science Policy, and in 2004 she became vice minister-president of the Flemish Government and Flemish Minister for Economy, Enterprise, Science, Innovation and Foreign Trade. MARK B. MYERS Mark B. Myers is a consultant in the fields of R&D management, emerging technology trends, entrepreneurial startups, and national innovation policies. He served on the National Resarch Council’s Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy (STEP) from 1994 to 2005, where he was the co-chair of the STEP study, A Patent System for the 21st Century. Dr. Myers recently com- pleted an appointment as the Walter C. Bladstrom Visiting Executive Professor in Entrepreneurial Management at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School (2004-2005) and Visiting Executive Professor of Management (2002–2005), where his research interests included identifying emerging markets and technolo- gies to enable growth in new and existing companies with special emphases on technology identification and selection, product development, and technology competencies. He retired from the Xerox Corporation in 2000, after a 37-year career in its R&D laboratories. He was the Xerox senior vice president in charge of corporate research, advanced development, systems architecture and corpo- rate engineering from 1992 to 2000. His responsibilities included the corporate research centers in Palo Alto, California; Webster, NewYork; Toronto Canada; Cambridge, UK; and Grenoble, France. During this period, he was also a member of the senior management committee in charge of the strategic direction setting of the company. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Earlham College and a doctorate in materials science from the Pennsylvania State University. PIKE POWERS A partner since 1978, Pike Powers is partner-in-charge of Fulbright & Jaworski L.L.P.’s Austin office. Mr. Powers was executive assistant to Governor Mark White in 1983 and from 1972 to 1979 represented Jefferson County in the Texas House of Representatives. He has extensive experience in handling com- plex legal and political issues before state courts and federal courts, as well as federal and state agencies. Mr. Powers has been a member of the board of directors of the State Bar of Texas and has held various posts as well in the American Bar Association and in the Texas and American Bar Foundations. He is a former chairman of the Board

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1 APPENDIX B of the Austin Chamber of Commerce. Mr. Powers is a member of the Maritime Law Association of the United States, the Federation of Insurance and Corporate Counsel, and the National Association of Railroad Trial Counsel. Mr. Powers was named as a “Texas Super Lawyer” in general litigation law in the November 2003 issue of Texas Monthly. Mr. Powers received a B.A. in 1962 from Lamar University and a J.D. in 1965 from The University of Texas. He was admitted in 1965 to practice law in Texas. GEORGE M. SCALISE George M. Scalise is president of the Semiconductor Industry Associa- tion (SIA) where he directs a staff focused on International Trade & Govern- ment Affairs, Workforce, Technology, Environmental-Safety & Health, and Communications. Scalise came to the SIA from Apple Computer, where he served as executive vice president of operations. Prior to that, he held executive management posi- tions at National Semiconductor, Maxtor Corporation, Advanced Micro Devices, Fairchild Semiconductor, and Motorola Semiconductor. A graduate of Purdue University with a bachelor of science degree in mechan- ical engineering, Mr. Scalise is a highly respected technology industry spokes- person and carries a special interest and expertise in technology, international trade, and competition issues. He was a founding member of the Semiconductor Research Corporation, an industry-funded organization that provides resources for pre-competitive semiconductor research at American universities. Mr. Scalise currently serves on President George W. Bush’s Council of Advi- sors on Science and Technology as well as numerous boards, including Cadence Design Systems, Intermolecular, and iSuppli Corporation. He has also served on the boards at the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco (where he was chairman and was chairman of the executive committee of the Conference of Chairmen of the Federal Reserve System), SEMATECH, Semiconductor Research Corpora- tion, the Bay Area Economic Forum, and Dubai Silicon Oasis, and was a member of the Council on Foreign Relations Economic Task Force on Japan. He partici- pates on advisory committees at the College of Engineering at Purdue University and is a member of the California Council on Science and Technology Fellows Program. He served on the advisory committees at the Leavey School of Busi- ness at Santa Clara University and the School of Engineering at the University of Southern California. He was named a Distinguished Engineering Alumnus of Purdue University in 2002. He also chaired the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board, U.S. Department of Energy.

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1 APPENDIX B ERIC SLEECKX Eric Sleeckx started his career in 1982 as mechanical engineer at the Uni- versity Hospital in Leuven. He was responsible for the development of custom- made implants. In 1986 he moved to Philips Industrial activities where he became project leader for the development of the Compact Disc Video player. From 1988 to 1998 he was responsible for the research team, Product Innovation, at WTCM (research centre for the technological industry). Finally he joined The Institute for the Promotion of Innovation by Science and Technology in Flanders where he has been coordinating a variety of innovation support programs and the CIN (cooperative innovation networks) and since autumn 2005 has coordinated the Monitoring and Analysis unit. WILLIAM J. SPENCER William J. Spencer was named chairman emeritus of the SEMATECH Board in November 2000 after serving as chairman of the SEMATECH and Inter- national SEMATECH Boards since July 1996. He came to SEMATECH in October 1990 as president and chief executive officer. He continued to serve as president until January 1997 and CEO until November 1997. During this time, SEMATECH became totally privately funded and expanded to include non-U.S. members. Many gave SEMATECH part of the credit for the U.S. semiconductor turnaround in the 1990s. Dr. Spencer has held key research positions at Xerox Corporation, Bell Labo- ratories, and Sandia National Laboratories. Before joining SEMATECH in October 1990, he was group vice president and senior technical officer at Xerox Corpora- tion in Stamford, Connecticut, from 1986 to 1990. He established new research centers in Europe and developed a plan for Xerox retaining ownership in spinout companies from research. Prior to joining the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) as manager of the Integrated Circuit Laboratory in 1981 and as the Center Manager of PARC in 1982 to 1986, Dr. Spencer served as director of Systems Development from 1978 to 1981 at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, and director of Microelectronics at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque from 1973 to 1978, where he developed a silicon processing facility for Depart- ment of Energy needs. He began his career in 1959 at Bell Laboratories. Dr. Spencer received the Regents Meritorious Service Medal from the Uni- versity of New Mexico in 1981; the C. B. Sawyer Award for contribution to “The Theory and Development of Piezoelectric Devices” in 1972; and a Citation for Achievement from William Jewell College in 1969, where he also received a doctor of science degree in 1990. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and serves on numerous advisory groups and boards, including the Committee on Comparative Innovation Policy at the National Research Council. He was the Regents Professor at the University of California in the spring of l998. He

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170 APPENDIX B has been a visiting professor at the University of California at Berkeley School of Engineering and the Haas School of Business since the fall of 1998. He is a research professor of medicine at the University of New Mexico. PETER SPYNS Peter Spyns has studied at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (M.A. in romance philology, and M.Sc. and Ph.D. in computer science). He has worked as a researcher on various European Union (EU) projects in the field of medical language and knowledge processing at the university hospital in Leuven and, later on, in Ghent (each time at the division of Medical Informatics). After obtaining his Ph.D. in 1996, Dr. Spyns joined the speech and language technology company Lernout & Hauspie Speech Products (L&H), once a world- wide leader in its domain. He was active as a principal linguistic engineer in the area of spoken dialogue systems. For one year he was seconded to the joint venture between Intel Corporation and L&H, during which he assisted the chief technology officer with assessment of speech and language processing tools and information extraction and retrieval technologies. After the collapse of L&H, Dr. Spyns returned in 2002 to academia (Vrije Universiteit Brussel) where he became a postdoc senior researcher in the field of ontology engineering and the semantic web. Since beginning 2006, Dr. Spyns has been a senior researcher at the Technol- ogy & Innovation unit of the Department of Economy, Science, and Innovation of the Flemish Government. His main activities concern the innovation policy in Flanders. In that respect, he currently participates in the EU ERA-net project, VISION, on innovation policy preparation and represents Flanders in some national and international committees (Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development Working Group on Innovation and Technology Policy, GSO Trendchart on Innovation, and VRWB-CTB). In addition, Dr. Spyns coordinates the joint research program between Flanders and the Netherlands on speech and language technology for Dutch (STEVIN). For these tasks, he is seconded to the Dutch Language Union. In his spare time, he still performs some scientific research work on ontologies and the semantic web for the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. MARC G. STANLEY Marc G. Stanley has been the director of the Advanced Technology Program (ATP) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) since June 2003. He also serves as a U.S. Governor on the Israel-U.S. Binational Industrial Research and Development (BIRD) Foundation Board of Governors and as the American Director on the Trilateral Industrial Development (TRIDE) Executive Committee.

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171 APPENDIX B Mr. Stanley served as the acting director of ATP from 2001 to 2003 and as the associate director for the program from 1993 to 2001. Before coming to NIST, Mr. Stanley was the associate deputy secretary of the U.S. Department of Commerce (DoC) by presidential appointment. He served as counselor to the NIST Director, as a consultant to DoC’s Technology Administra- tion, and as assistant secretary for congressional and intergovernmental affairs at DoC. Mr. Stanley earned a B.A. from George Washington University and a bach- elor of law degree from the University of Baltimore. JAMES TURNER James Turner has served on the professional staff of the Committee on Sci- ence in the U.S. House of Representatives for over 25 years. He currently serves as the full committee chief democratic counsel where he works across the board on the committee’s legislative agenda. For the 10 years prior to the Republican takeover of Congress, Mr. Turner was the committee’s senior staff member for technology policy including 4 years as technology subcommittee staff director. He also served as a subcommittee legal counsel. During the late 1970s and early 1980s, he worked on the com- mittee’s Republican staff as minority energy counsel. His legislative interests include the international competitiveness of U.S. industry, environmental and energy research and development, trade and technology policy, intellectual prop- erty, standards, and technology transfer. Mr. Turner’s work has been recognized over the years through awards presented by the American Mathematical Society, American National Standards Institute, American Society for Mechanical Engi- neering, ASTM International, Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer, Federal Patent Law Association, National Institute for Building Science, Semiconductor Industry Association, Technology Transfer Society, U.S. Metric Association, and the Virginia Engineering Foundation. Mr. Turner also spent 3 years working for Wheelabrator-Frye, 2 years for Congressman Gary Myers, 2 years for the State of Connecticut, and shorter periods with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Federal Aviation Administration. He holds degrees from Georgetown and Yale Universi- ties and from Westminster College and attended the Senior Managers in Govern- ment Program at Harvard University. Mr. Turner currently serves on the Boards of Trustees of University of Virginia’s (UVA’s) School of Engineering, the Accelerating Innovation Founda- tion, and ASTM International; on the Advisory Boards for Carnegie Mellon’s Heinz School; The Science, Technology and Society Program at UVA, and the journal Innoations, published by MIT Press; and on the Vestry of St. Columba’s Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C. Mr. Turner also is the Washington coor- dinator for the MIT and UVA joint Washington Summer Intern Program.

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172 APPENDIX B BART VAN LOOY Bart Van Looy is professor at K.U.Leuven in the field of innovation and organization, within the Department of Managerial Economics, Strategy and Innovation (Faculty of Economics and Applied Economics). His current research focuses on organizing innovation (company level) and regional innovation sys- tems: entrepreneurial universities and science-technology interactions are focal points of attention in this respect. Bart Van Looy has published on these topics in journals like Research Policy, the Journal of Product and Innoation Manage- ment, R&D Management, Scientometrics, and the Journal of Technology Transfer. He is also first editor of an international text book on services management (FT/ Prentice Hall; 1998/2003; Japanese edition: 2005; Chinese edition, 2006). Bart Van Looy has been at K.U.Leuven since 1998. He holds master’s degrees in psychology and applied economics. He obtained his Ph.D. in organizational psychology at K.U.Leuven in 2000. His research is focused in the area of tech- nology and innovation management (project/company level), the role of entrepre- neurial universities in economic development, science-technology interactions in conjunction with technological development trajectories, and knowledge inten- sive ventures. Bart Van Looy is also actively engaged in the European Institute of Advanced Studies in Management (EIASM). Currently he is responsible at INCENTIM for several research projects carried out in close collaboration with K.U.Leuven R&D, DWTC (Belgium), the European Commission, and Steunpunt O&O Statistieken (Flemish Region), where he is also engaged as senior scientist responsible for the patent database infrastructure and the related service and research activities. In October 2005 Bart Van Looy was appointed as professor at K.U.Leuven within the field of innovation and organization teaching the follow- ing courses: Introduction to Management (bachelor/master level); Innovation Management (master level) and Innovation and Technology Management (master after master level). He is also teaching the course Managerial Research Methods within the MBA program of the Flanders Business School (Antwerp) where he recently became appointed as scientific coordinator. Before joining K.U.Leuven, he worked as a consultant within the field of HRM, organizational behavior and organizational design (1990-1996), and as a researcher at the Vlerick Manage- ment School, University of Ghent (1996-1998). CHARLES W. WESSNER Charles W. Wessner is a policy advisor recognized nationally and interna- tionally for his expertise on innovation policy, including public-private partner- ships, entrepreneurship, early-stage financing for new firms, and the special needs and benefits of high-technology industry. He testifies to the U.S. Congress and major national commissions, advises agencies of the U.S. government and international organizations, and lectures at major universities in the United States and abroad. Reflecting the strong global interest in innovation, he is

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17 APPENDIX B frequently asked to address issues of shared policy interest with foreign govern- ments, universities, and research institutes, often briefing government ministers and senior officials. Dr. Wessner’s work addresses the linkages between science-based economic growth, entrepreneurship, new technology development, university-industry clus- ters, regional development, small firm finance, and public-private partnerships. His program at the National Academies also addresses policy issues associated with international technology cooperation, investment, and trade in high-technology industries. Currently, he directs a series of studies centered on government mea- sures to encourage entrepreneurship and to support the development of new technologies. Foremost among these is a congressionally mandated study of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, reviewing the operation and achievements of this $2 billion award program for small companies and startups. A major review of the technology drivers of the New Economy and its sustained productivity growth is nearing completion. He is also directing a major new study on best practice in global innovation programs, entitled Comparatie Innoation Policy: Best Practice for the 21st Century. ALAN WM. WOLFF Alan Wm. Wolff is Managing Partner of Dewey Ballantine’s Washington, D.C. office and chairs Dewey Ballantine’s International Trade Group. Founded by Alan Wolff in 1979, the International Trade Group consists of 24 lawyers, 11 economists and analysts, and 12 research assistants, and is known for taking an interdisciplinary approach to trade issues drawing on in- depth resources in law, policy, and economic and factual research. The Group is involved on behalf of clients in major initiatives to open international markets for both goods and services as well as representing clients in a broad range of trade litigation before government agencies, courts, NAFTA bi-national panels, and dispute settlement in the World Trade Organization. Its activities include dealing with matters involving government regulations and tariffs, antidumping and subsidy cases, competition policy, intellectual property rights, and investment regulations. The Group also regularly conducts investigations and represents clients in enforcement proceedings regarding a broad range of regulatory require- ments including export regulations, sanctions, boycotts, foreign corrupt practices, money laundering, and various statutory compliance audits. Alan Wolff also serves as chairman of the Advisory Board of The Institute for Trade & Commercial Diplomacy, and is currently a member of the National Research Council’s Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy, the U.S. Department of State’s Advisory Committee on International Economic Policy, the Advisory Committee of the Institute for International Economics, the Advisory Board of the Economic Strategy Institute, the Board of Trustees of the United States Council for International Business, the Board of Advisors of the American

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17 APPENDIX B Health and Education Foundation, the Council on Foreign Relations, the American Society of International Law, and the American Bar Association. Mr. Wolff served as United States Deputy Special Representative for Trade Negotiations (1977-1979), holding the rank of ambassador; he was General Counsel of the agency from 1974 to 1977. From 1968 to 1973, Mr. Wolff was an attorney dealing with international monetary, trade, and development issues at the Treasury Department. Mr. Wolff has co-authored books and published numerous papers on trade and U.S. trade law, many of which are listed on the International Trade Group’s web site (). Mr. Wolff received an LL.B. from Columbia University in 1966 and an A.B. from Harvard College in 1963. He is a member of the bar in Massachusetts, New York, the District of Columbia, the U.S. Court of International Trade, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, and the Supreme Court of the United States.