Appendix A
Biographies

PLANNING COMMITTEE MEMBERS

NORMAN P. NEUREITER, Chair, is the director of the Center for Science, Technology and Security Policy at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). He retired in September 2003 from the post of science and technology adviser to the secretary of state. Dr. Neureiter had a long association with Texas Instruments (TI), including service as vice president of Texas Instruments Asia. While at TI, he held a number of positions, including director of East-West business development, manager of international business development, manager of the TI Europe Division, and director of TI-Japan. Before his work with private industry, his diplomatic experience included a posting as the first U.S. science attaché in Eastern Europe from 1967 to 1969. Dr. Neureiter worked as international-affairs assistant in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy during 1969-1973, reporting to the president’s science adviser. Dr. Neureiter is the recipient of the 2003 AAAS Philip Hauge Abelson Prize, which he received for substantial contributions in building more effective relationships between the diplomatic and scientific communities and in increasing both communities’ awareness of the importance of science and its value in international statecraft. He is a former member of the Space Studies Board.


SPENCE M. (SAM) ARMSTRONG retired from NASA in December 2002. As senior adviser to the NASA administrator, Gen. Armstrong promoted partnerships with academe, the Department of Defense, and industry. He was the ombudsman for academic institutions in such matters as export control, information-technology security, and NASA’s grants process. Before joining NASA, he served for 34 years in the U.S. Air Force; he retired with the rank of lieutenant general. He went to NASA in 1991 from the White House-chartered Synthesis Group, which developed architectures to return humans to the Moon and send them to Mars. Gen. Armstrong was appointed associate administrator of the newly created Office of Human Resources and Education, where he was responsible for developing NASA’s human-resources strategic plan and for emphasizing NASA’s educational goals. He is a member of the National Research Council Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable.


DANIEL N. BAKER is a professor of astrophysical and planetary sciences and director of the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He is also the director of the Center for Limb Atmospheric Sounding and is a member of the Center for Integrated Plasma Studies. His primary research interest covers the study of plasma physical and energetic particle phenomena in the planetary magnetospheres



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Appendix A Biographies PLANNING COMMITTEE MEMBERS NORMAN P. NEUREITER, Chair, is the director of the Center for Science, Technology and Security Policy at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). He retired in September 2003 from the post of science and technology adviser to the secretary of state. Dr. Neureiter had a long association with Texas Instruments (TI), including service as vice president of Texas Instruments Asia. While at TI, he held a number of positions, including director of East-West business development, manager of international business development, manager of the TI Europe Division, and director of TI-Japan. Before his work with private industry, his diplomatic experience included a posting as the first U.S. science attaché in Eastern Europe from 1967 to 1969. Dr. Neureiter worked as international-affairs assistant in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy during 1969- 1973, reporting to the president’s science adviser. Dr. Neureiter is the recipient of the 2003 AAAS Philip Hauge Abelson Prize, which he received for substantial contributions in building more effective relationships between the diplomatic and scientific communities and in increasing both communities’ awareness of the importance of science and its value in international statecraft. He is a former member of the Space Studies Board. SPENCE M. (SAM) ARMSTRONG retired from NASA in December 2002. As senior adviser to the NASA admin- istrator, Gen. Armstrong promoted partnerships with academe, the Department of Defense, and industry. He was the ombudsman for academic institutions in such matters as export control, information-technology security, and NASA’s grants process. Before joining NASA, he served for 34 years in the U.S. Air Force; he retired with the rank of lieutenant general. He went to NASA in 1991 from the White House-chartered Synthesis Group, which developed architectures to return humans to the Moon and send them to Mars. Gen. Armstrong was appointed associate administrator of the newly created Office of Human Resources and Education, where he was responsible for developing NASA’s human-resources strategic plan and for emphasizing NASA’s educational goals. He is a member of the National Research Council Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable. DANIEL N. BAKER is a professor of astrophysical and planetary sciences and director of the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He is also the director of the Center for Limb Atmospheric Sounding and is a member of the Center for Integrated Plasma Studies. His primary research interest covers the study of plasma physical and energetic particle phenomena in the planetary magnetospheres 25

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 SPACE SCIENCE AND THE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS and Earth’s magnetosphere. He also conducts research in space-instrument design, space-physics data analysis, and magnetospheric modeling. Dr. Baker is a member of the Space Studies Board. RETA F. BEEBE is a professor in the Astronomy Department at New Mexico State University, Las Cruces. Her research activities involve the study of the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn and in particular cloud motions and evolution in Jupiter’s atmosphere. She is the author of several books and articles concerning telescopic observations of the giant planets, including Jupiter: The Giant Planet. Dr. Beebe manages the Atmospheres Discipline Node of NASA’s Planetary Data System and was a member of the Galileo imaging team and lead scientist for the team using the Hubble Space Telescope to provide context images for the Galileo project. She is a former member of the Space Studies Board. CLAUDE R. CANIZARES is the vice president for research, associate provost, and Bruno Rossi Professor of Physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He has overall responsibility for research activity and policy at MIT, overseeing more than a dozen interdisciplinary research laboratories and centers, including the MIT Lincoln Laboratory, the Broad Institute, the Plasma Science and Fusion Center, the Research Laboratory of Electronics, the Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, the Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, Haystack Observa- tory, and the Division of Health Sciences and Technology. He also oversees several offices dealing with research policy and administration, chairs the Research Policy Committee, and serves on the Academic Council and the Academic Appointments Committee. Dr. Canizares is the associate director of the Chandra X-ray Center and a principal investigator on NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory. Dr. Canizares is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He chaired the Space Studies Board from 1994 to 2000. JOHN R. CASANI is special assistant to the director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). He is the JPL director’s lead person on issues related to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations. During his long career in project management and system engineering, he has served as project manager for the Voyager mission to the outer planets, the Galileo mission to Jupiter, and the Cassini mission to Saturn, and he held project positions in JPL’s early Explorer, Pioneer, Ranger, and Mariner space missions. He has received NASA’s Distinguished Ser- vice, Outstanding Leadership, and Exceptional Achievement medals; the Space Systems Award from the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics; the von Karman Lectureship in Astronautics; and the National Space Club’s Astronaut’s Engineer Award. Dr. Casani is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. JACQUELINE N. HEWITT is a professor of physics and director of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research. The focus of her research is the application of radio astronomy, interferometry, and signal processing to basic research in astrophysics and cosmology. Dr. Hewitt’s honors include the American Physical Society’s Maria Goeppert Mayer Award, the International Union of Radio Science’s Henry G. Booker Prize, the National Science Foundation’s Presidential Young Investigator Award, and the Annie Jump Cannon Award in astronomy. She is a former member of the Space Studies Board. RAPPORTEUR MARGARET G. FINARELLI is a senior fellow in the Center for Aerospace Policy Research at George Mason University. She began her career with NASA and other U.S. government agencies focused on strategy develop- ment and negotiations in domestic space policy and international relations in science and technology. At NASA (1981-2000), she rose to the position of associate administrator for policy coordination and international relations. She was responsible for developing the international partnerships in the International Space Station program and led the U.S. team conducting the international negotiations that resulted in the agreements governing NASA’s cooperation with Europe, Japan, and Canada. As the International Space University’s vice president for North American operations (2000-2006), she was responsible for strategic partnerships and business development in the United States for the Strasbourg, France–based international university.

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 APPENDIX A STAFF JOSEPH K. ALEXANDER served previously as director of the Space Studies Board (SSB), deputy assistant administrator for science in the Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Research and Development, associ- ate director of space sciences at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and assistant associate administrator of the NASA Office of Space Science and Applications. He has also been deputy NASA chief scientist and senior policy analyst at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Mr. Alexander’s own research work has been in radio astronomy and space physics. He received a B.S. and an M.A. in physics from the College of William and Mary. CARMELA J. CHAMBERLAIN has worked for the National Academies since 1974. She started as a senior project assistant in the Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources (which is now the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research in the Division on Earth and Life Studies), where she worked for 2 years. She then transferred to the Space Science Board, which is now the Space Studies Board. She is an administrative assistant with SSB. CATHERINE A. GRUBER is an assistant editor with the SSB. She joined SSB as a senior program assistant in 1995. Ms. Gruber came to the National Research Council in 1988 as a senior secretary for the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board and has also worked as an outreach assistant for the National Academy of Sciences-Smithsonian Institution’s National Science Resources Center. She was a research assistant (chemist) in the National Institute of Mental Health’s Laboratory of Cell Biology for 2 years. She has a B.A. in natural science from St. Mary’s College of Maryland. VICTORIA SWISHER is a research associate. She has supported SSB studies and workshops on the aerospace workforce, Mars research, research enabled by the lunar environment, and other topics. Before joining SSB, she did research in x-ray astronomy and laboratory astrophysics, which included studying x-rays from plasmas and culminated in her senior thesis, “Modeling UV and X-ray Spectra from the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment.” A graduate of Swarthmore College, she majored in astronomy and minored in English literature. SANDRA WILSON is a program assistant for the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board (ASEB). She came to the National Research Council in 2007 and was a temporary assistant in ASEB, the National Materials Advisory Board, and the SSB. During that time, she worked on projects involving an independent assessment of the nation’s Wake Turbulence R&D Program, an assessment of NASA’s Aeronautics Research Program, an evaluation of corro- sion education, and a workshop on lunar research and technology. Earlier, Mrs. Wilson had served in a managerial capacity in the retail industry. She is enrolled at Prince George’s Community College, majoring in accounting.