Click for next page ( 571


The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 570
Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee and Pane! Members and Staff HUBERT M. BLALOCK, JR., is professor of sociology and adjunct professor of political science at the University of Washington. He taught previously at the University of Michigan, Yale University, and the University of North Carolina. He has an A.B. degree from Dartmouth College, an M.A. degree from Brown University, and a Ph.D. degree from the University of North Carolina. His research interests include race relations theory, sociological theory, applied statistics, and research methodology. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a fellow of the American Statistical Association, and a past president of the American Sociological Association. He is the author of Toward a Theory of Minority Group Relations; Black-White Relations in the 1980's: Toward a ~g-Term Policy; R=e and Ethnic Relations; and numerous statistical and methodological books and articles. LAWRENCE BOBO is associate professor of sociology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He received a B.A. degree from Loyola Marymount University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Michigan. His research interests include racial attitudes and relations in the United States, social psychology, public opinion, and political behavior. He has been a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. He serves on the editorial board of Public Opinion Quarterly and as a member of the National Science Foundation Board of Overseers for the National Opinion Research Center's General Social Survey. He is coauthor of the award-w~nning book Racial Attitudes in America and author of articles on many topics in sociology and public opinion. LEE e BROWN is chief of police of the city of Houston. He has a B.A. degree in criminology from Fresno State University, an M.A. degree in sociology from San Jose State University, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in criminology from the University of California, Berkeley. He has held posi 570

OCR for page 570
APPENDIX B tions in the criminal justice system in San Jose; Multnomah County, Ore- gon; and Atlanta as well as academic positions at Portland State University and Howard University. He is vice president of the International Association of Chiefs of Police and has been a member of the National Research Coun- cil's Committee on Research on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice. He received an honorary doctorate of laws from the John lay College of Criminal Justice in 1984; the national law enforcement award from the National Black Police Officers Association in 1982; and the Robert Lamb, Ir., humanitarian award from the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives in 1987. He is coauthor of The Police and Society: An Environment for Collaboration and Confrontation and author of nu- merous articles. THOMAS E. CAVANAGH is director of the Johns Hopkins University Cen- ter for the Study of American Government. He has B.A. and M.A. degrees in political science from Yale University. Previously he was on the faculty of Wesleyan University and Trinity College, served on the staff of the U.S. House of Representatives and the Joint Center for Political Studies in Wash- ington, D.C., and was a guest scholar at the Brookings Institution. He has written widely on the subjects of black politics, voter turnout, Congress, and the U.S. party system. JOHN BROWN CHILDS is associate professor of sociology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He has a Ph.D. degree in cultural and urban anthropology from the State University of New York, Buffalo. Previously he taught at Yale University and Amherst College. He has been a Ford Foun- dation Fellow and an Andrew W. Mellon Faculty Fellow at Harvard Univer- sity. His research involves populist and elitist social movements and the relationship between religion and political action. He is the author of Lead- ership, Conflict, and Cooperation in Afi~o-Ameni;an Social Thought and The Polit- ical Black Minister: A Study in Afi~o-Am~ncan Politics and Religion as well as numerous articles. SHELDON H. DANZIGER is professor of social work and public policy and also faculty associate at the Population Studies Center, University of Michi- gan. Previously he was director of the Institute for Research on Poverty, professor of social work, and Romnes Faculty Fellow at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Danziger received a B.A. degree from Columbia Uni- versity and a Ph.D. degree in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is the coeditor of Fighting Poverty: What Works omd What Doesn't: The Distritoution Impacts of Public Policies; and State Policy Choices: The Wisconsin Exp~e. He is the author of numerous scholarly articles on poverty, income inequality, and social welfare programs and policies. KAREN e DAVIS is chair of the Department of Health Policy and Manage- ment in the School of Hygiene and Public Health and professor of econom 571

OCR for page 570
A COMMON DESTINY: BLACKS AND AMERICAN SOCIETY ics at Johns Hopkins University. She has a Ph.D. degree in economics from Rice University. Previous positions she has held include deputy assistant secretary for planning and evaluation for health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and visiting lecturer at Harvard University. She is a member of the Physician Review Commission and the Institute of Medicine council and director of the Commonwealth Fund Commission on Elderly People Living Alone. She serves as regional editor for the journal Health Policy and is the author of numerous books and articles on health economics and policy analysis, including Medicare Policy: New Directions for Health and ~r~g-Term Care; Health awl the War on Poverty: A Te~rear Ap- praisal; and National Health Insurance: Berets, Costs and Consequences. DAVID T. ELEWOOD is professor of public policy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He has A.B. and Ph.D. degrees from Harvard University, both in economics. His recent work has focused on problems of the poor and disadvantaged and policies designed to help them, particularly among minorities and women and children in single- parent families. He has also done extensive work examining the causes and consequences of youth unemployment, particularly among ghetto youth. He has served on gubernatorial committees in New York and Arizona and has frequently testified before Congress on reform measures. He is the author of Poor Support. REYNOLDS PARLEY, a demographer, is research scientist at the Population Studies Center and professor of sociology at the University of Michigan. Previously he taught at Duke University. He has a Ph.D. degree from the University of Chicago. His work focuses on the social, economic, and dem- ographic characteristics of racial and ethnic groups in the United States, particularly changes in the status of blacks since the civil rights revolution of the 1960s. He is the author of Blacks and Whites: Nawawt~ the Gap? and, with Walter R. Allen, The Color Line and the Quality of Life in America. He has served as president of the Population Association of America. JOHN HOPE FRANKLIN is the James B. Duke Professor Emeritus of History and professor of legal history in the Law School at Duke University. He is a graduate of Fisk University and has A.M. and Ph.D. degrees in history from Harvard University. He has taught at a number of institutions, including Fisk University, North Carolina Central University, and Howard University, and served as the chair of the Department of History at both Brooklyn College and the University of Chicago. He has served on the National Council on the Humanities, the Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy, the President's Advisory Commission on Ambassadorial Ap- pointments, and the twenty-first general conference of the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). He has been president of the American Studies Association, the Southern Historical As 572

OCR for page 570
APPENDIX B sociation, the United Chapters of Phi Beta Kappa, the Organization of American Historians, and the American Historical Association. He serves on the editorial board of the Tonsil of Negro History and has written many books on blacks in American history, including From Slavery to Freedom: A History of Negro Americans and a biography of George Washington Williams that won the Clarence L. Holte Literary Prize. JAMES LOWELL GI BBS, J R., is Martin Luther King, Ir., Centennial Profes- sor and chair of the Department of Anthropology at Stanford University, where he has been a member of the faculty since 1965. He has a B.A. from Cornell University and a Ph.D. in social anthropology from Harvard Uni- versity. He is a fellow of the American Anthropological Association, the African Studies Association, and the International African Institution. His research involves social organization, African ethnology, and culture and personality. He is editor of Peoples of Africa and the author of numerous journal articles. BERNARD R. G! FFORD is vice president of education at Apple Computer, Inc. He has a Ph.D. degree in radiation biologr and biophysics from the University of Rochester. Previously he served as chancellor's professor and dean of the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Berkeley; as vice president and professor of political science and public policy at the University of Rochester; as a resident scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation; and as deputy chancellor of the New York City Public Schools. He was awarded an honorary doctorate of humane letters from Long Island University in 1988. The range of his publications covers applied physics as well as public policy; in recent years he has focused on the process of educational change and reform. His latest books are History in the Schools: What Shall We Teach.7, Test Policy and the Politics of Opportunity Allocation: The Workplace and the Law, and Testing Policy and Test Pe~own~nce: Education, Lange, and Culture. NATHAN GLAZER is professor of education and sociology at Harvard Uni- versity. He has a B.A. degree from the City College of New York, an M.A. degree from the University of Pennsylvania, and a Ph.D. degree in sociology from Columbia University. He taught previously at the University of Cali- fornia, Berkeley, and has served on presidential task forces and other national committees on urban affairs and education. His published books include Beyond the Melting Pot (with Daniel P. Moynihan), Affirmative Discrimination, and The Limits of Social Policy; he has edited, alone or in collaboration with others, numerous volumes, including Studies in Ho?~sin,g and Minority Groups, Ethnic Pluralism and P?~lolic Policy, and Clamor at the Gates: The New American . . Immigration. BEATRIX A. HAMBURG is professor of psychiatry and pediatrics as well as director of the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the Mount 573

OCR for page 570
A COMMON DESTINY: BLACKS AND AMERICAN SOCIETY Sinai School of Medicine. She has a B.A. degree from Vassar College and an M.D. degree from Yale Medical School. She has held positions at Stanford University; the National Institute of Mental Health, where she organized a national program for research in child psychiatry; and Harvard Medical School, dividing her time between the Children's Hospital and the Division of Health Policy Research and Education. Her major research interests are developmental psychology and neurobiology of normal adolescence and ad- olescent psychiatric disorders, and she has maintained a strong involvement in health policy research. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine, of the National Research Council's Commission on Behavioral and Social Sci- ences and Education, and of the board of directors of the American Associ- ation for the Advancement of Science. She has received the Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration's award for outstanding achieve- ment. She is the editor of two books and the author of numerous scientific articles. CHARLES V. HAMILTON is Wallace Sayre Professor of Government at Co- lumbia University, where he has taught since 1969. He taught previously at Lincoln University and Roosevelt University. He has a B.A. degree from Roosevelt University, a I.D. degree from Loyola University, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in political science from the University of Chicago. He was vice president of the American Political Science Association in 1973-1974. His research is concerned with race and ethnic politics and public policy analysis. He is the author of The Black Expertise in American Politics and The Bench and the Ballot: Soothe Federal] - es and the Right to Vote. JOE: F. HANDLER is professor of law at the University of California, Los Angeles. He received an A.B. degree from Princeton University and a I.D. degree from Harvard Law School. Previously he was the Vitas Research Professor and the George A. Wiley Professor at the University of Wisconsin Law School and served on the senior research staff at the university's Insti ~ _ . . ~ tute for Research on Poverty. He has served on several committees of the National Research Council and as chair of the Panel on Public Policies Contributing to the Deinstitutionalization of Children and Youth. He has been a Guggenheim Fellow and a member of the board of trustees, executive committee, of the Law and Society Association. His primary research inter- ests are in the areas of poverty law and administration, social welfare pro- grams, race, social movements, public interest law, legal services, and law reform activities. He has published a dozen books and numerous articles on these subjects. ROBERT M. HAWSER is Vilas Research Professor of Sociology and director of the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin, where he has been on the faculty since 1969. He has also held a faculty appointment at Brown University and visiting appointments at the Institute for Advanced Study in Vienna and at the University of Bergen. He received 574

OCR for page 570
APPENDIX B an A.B. degree from the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Michigan. His doctoral thesis was chosen for publication in the Rose Monograph Series of the American Sociological Association, and he has won the Paul F. Lazarsfeld award in research methods from the American Sociological Association. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Statistical Association, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His publications related to education and social ine- quality include five books and numerous articles. His current research inter- ests include trends in educational attainment and social mobility in the United States, cross-national comparisons of social mobility, and the effects on families of social and economic inequality. DARNELL F. HAWKINS is professor of black studies and sociology at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Previously he taught at the University of North Carolina. He has A.M. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from the University of Michigan and a I.D. degree from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. His research and publications concern the sociology of law, criminology, and deviance as well as race and ethnic relations. He received a graduate fellowship in 1974 from the National Fellowships Fund, a residency in law and social science fellowship from the Russell Sage Foun- dation, and a postdoctoral fellowship from the Ford Foundation and the National Research Council. He is a member of the American Society of Criminology, the American Sociological Association, and the National Crim- inal Justice Association and is a member of the board of trustees of the Law and Society Association. He is the editor of Homicide Amp Black Americans and author of "Beyond Anomalies: Rethinking the Conflict Perspective on Race and Criminal Punishment" and other journal articles. M. ALFRED HAYNES is director of the Drew-Meharry-Moorehouse Consor- tium Cancer Center in Los Angeles. Previously he was president and dean of the Charles R. Drew Postgraduate Medical School. He has a B.S. degree from Columbia University, an M.P.H. degree in epidemiology from Harvard University, and an M.D. degree from the Downstate Medical Center of the State University of New York. He is a past president of the American College of Preventive Medicine; a fellow of the American Association for the Ad- vancement of Science; a member of Alpha Omega Alpha and the council of the Institute of Medicine; and an overseas fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine. His professional work has focused on preventive medicine and community health, particularly of black Americans. He is the author of many journal articles and other publications on the topics of community medicine, black professionals in medicine, health problems of black Ameri- cans and residents of the inner city, and doctor-patient relationships. JAMES J. HECKMAN is professor of economics at Yale University (on leave from the University of Chicago). He has a B.A. degree from Colorado 575

OCR for page 570
A COMMON DESTINY: BLACKS AND AMERICAN SOCIETY College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Princeton University. He has taught at Yale University, Columbia University, and New York University and held positions at the National Bureau of Economic Research, the Na- tional Opinion Research Center, and the Rand Corporation. He is a fellow of the Econometric Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has been a member of committees of the Social Science Research Council and the National Research Council. He has been editor of numerous profes- sional journals, including the Journal of Econometrics, the Journal of Polit~cat Economy, and Econame~c Redips. He was awarded the John Bates Clark Medal by the American Economics Association in 1983. He has published two books and numerous journal articles on topics in econometrics. NORMAN HI tE is president of the A. Philip Randolph Institute. He has a B.A. degree in sociology from Haverford College. Previously he was national program director of the Congress of Racial Equality and legislative represen- tative and civil rights liaison of the industrial union department of the AFL- CIO. Since joining the A. Philip Randolph Institute in 1967, he has organ- ized more than 180 affiliates, largely made up of rank-and-file union mem- bers engaged in voter registration, voter education, and get-out-the-vote campaigns. He serves on the board of trustees of Freedom House; on the National Committee of Social Democrats, USA; on the board of directors of the League for Industrial Democracy; and on the executive committee of the Coalition for a Democratic Majority. He is a member of Local 3, the Newspaper Guild, AFL-CIO; has published articles in such journals as the AFL-CIO News, The New Lear, and numerous black publications; and writes a monthly column for the black and labor press. JENNIFER t. HOCHSCHILD is professor of politics and public affairs at Princeton University, with a joint appointment in the Department of Politics and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. She has a B.A. degree from Oberlin College and a Ph.D. degree from Yale University. She has taught at Duke University and Columbia University. Her research interests focus on American social welfare and race policies, with a particular interest in the philosophical and political implications of the changing relationships among race, class, and political power. She has been a fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences and has received awards or research support from the American Philosophical Society, the Spencer Foundation, and the American Political Science Asso- ciation, and she has also served as a consultant or expert witness In several school desegregation cases. She is the author of What's Fair: American Beliefs About Dis~buti~e Justice and The New American Dilemma: Liberal Democracy and School Dese,gre,gation and a coauthor of Equalines as well as a variety of articles in the fields of political philosophy, American political thought, public opinion, and race in America. 576

OCR for page 570
APPENDIX B JAMES S. JACKSON is professor of psychology, research scientist at the Institute for Social Research, faculty associate at the Center for Afro-Ameri- can and African Studies and the Institute of Gerontologr, and an associate dean of the Rackham School of Graduate Studies at the University of Michi- gan. He received a B.A. degree in psychology from Michigan State Univer- sity, an M.A. degree in psychology from the University of Toledo, and a Ph.D. in social psychology from Wayne State University. He has conducted research in several areas, including race and ethnic relations, adult develop- ment and aging, social and psychological concomitants of health status, and black political behavior. He is a member of several editorial boards induding the Ps~holo,g~cal Bulletin, the jrournal of Gerontology, Psychological Sciences, and Race and Ethnic Relations. In addition to numerous scientific articles and chapters, he is editor or coeditor of several books, induding The Black American Elderly: Research on Physical and Psychsocial Health; Black American Life: A National Survey of Black Adults; and Psychiatric Epidemiology and Helm Seeking Among Black America, and he is the author of the forthcoming book Three Generations of Black American Families. GERALD DAVID JAYNES is professor in the Department of Economics and in the Program in African and African-American Studies at Yale University. He has a B.A. degree in philosophy and a Ph.D. degree in economics from the University of Illinois, Urbana. He is a fellow of the Joint Center for Political Studies and has served as a member of the board of economists for Black Enterprise magazine. His published research involves the areas of eco- nomic theory, public policy, and American history. He is the author of Branches Without Roots: Genesis of the Black Working Class in the American South, 1862-1882. JAMES JENNINGS is associate professor of political science, senior fellow of the William Monroe Trotter Institute, and former dean of the College of Public and Community Service at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. He received a Ph.D. degree from Columbia University. Previously he taught at Harvard University; Columbia University; Long Island University; the State University of New York, Albany; Cornell University; Boston College; and Northeastern University. He is senior editor of two books, From Access to Per: Black Politics in Boston and Presto Rican Politics in Brian Amp. He has published articles in various professional journals and books; lectured widely on politics and urban education, particularly on black and Latino political experiences; and provided consulting services to numerous govern- mental bodies and civic organizations. LYLE V. JON ES is professor of psychology and director of the L. L. Thur- stone Psychometric Laboratory at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, where he has served as vice chancellor and dean of the graduate school. He attended Reed College and received B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of Washington and a Ph.D. degree from Stanford University. He 577

OCR for page 570
A COMMON DESTINY: BLACKS AND AMERICAN SOCIETY was a faculty member at the University of Chicago and has held visiting faculty appointments at the universities of Illinois, Texas, and Washington. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a former president of the Association of Graduate Schools, the Psychometric Society, and the Division of Evaluation and Measurement of the American Psychological Association. He is and has been a member of several boards, commissions, and committees of the National Research Council. Among his recent publications are several that focus on differential trends in U.S. school achievement for black and white students. FRAN K LEVY is professor of public affairs in the School of Public Affairs at the University of Maryland. He has an S.B. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Yale University. He has taught at the University of California, Berkeley, and was a senior research associate at the Urban Institute. He is a member of the nominating committee of the American Economic Association, the advisory board of the Center for National Policy, and the policy council of the Association of Public Policy and Management. He has been a member of several committees of the National Research Council. His research concerns different aspects of U.S. living standards; his publications include "How Big is the American Underclass>," one of the first systematic attempts to look at permanent poverty in the United States, and Dollars and Dreams: The Chan,g- in~g American Income Distribution. STANLEY LlEBERSON is professor of sociology at Harvard University (on leave from the University of California, Berkeley). He has M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from the University of Chicago. He was awarded the university's Colver-Rosenberger Prize for the best dissertation in sociology in the preceding 3 years. His research concerns race and ethnic relations in contemporary American society. He is a former president of the Sociological Research Association and the Pacific Sociological Association and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is the author of nine books, including four on race and ethnic relations: Ethnic Patters in Ameri- can Cities; Lange and Ethnic Relations in Canada; Piece of the Pie: Blacks and White Immigrants Since 1880 (winner of the Sorokin Award); and (with Mary C. Waters) From Many Strands: Ethnic and Racial Groups in Contemporary America; plus many articles on this topic. MICHAEL LI PSKY is professor of political science at the Massachusetts Insti- tute of Technology. He has a B.A. degree from Oberlin College, an M.P.A. degree from the Woodrow Wilson School, and a Ph D. degree from Prince- ton University. His more recent research has focused on social welfare policy, issues of hunger and homelessness, and problems associated with govern- ment contracting for social services with nonprofit agencies. He has pub- lished books on the politics of relatively powerless groups, protest in City 578

OCR for page 570
APPENDIX B Politics; societal responses to racial violence, Commission Politics: The J~ocessi~ of Racial Crisis in America, with David I. Olson; and service delivery to needy and dependent populations, Street-Lerel Bureaucracy: Dilemmas of the Indiv~d- ?~al in Public Services. For the last book, he was awarded prizes by the American Political Science Association and the Society for the Study of Social Problems. GLENN C. LOWRY is professor of political economy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. Previously, he taught econom- ics at Northwestern University and the University of Michigan and has been a visiting scholar at Oxford University, Tel Aviv University, and the Univer- sity of Stockholm. He has a B.A. degree in mathematics from Northwestern University and a Ph.D. degree in economics from the Massachusetts Insti- tute of Technology. He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship for the academic year 1985-1986. He has served on the National Research Council's Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Loury has published extensively on a variety of topics in economic theory; his current work focuses on the politics and economics of racial inequality in the United States. He is now completing work on a book Free At Last.;, which provides an analysis of racial advocacy in the "post-civil rights era. " HARRIETTE PIPES McADOO is professor of research and social work in the School of Social Work at Howard University. She has B.A. and M.A. degrees from Michigan State University and a Ph.D. degree from the Uni- versity of Michigan in educational psychology and child development. She has been on the faculty of Smith College and has been a visiting professor at George Warren Brown School of Social Work and of Human Ecology at Michigan State University. She received the Marke Peters Award from the National Council of Families and the Outstanding Researcher of the Year award for 2 years from the National Association of Black Psychology. She was the elected program vice president for the National Council of Family Relations. She is coeditor (with John McAdoo) of Black Families and (with T. M. km Parham) of Black Children: Social, Educational, and Parental E~- ronments; editor of Sees to Yodel Families: Jo ram Renew and Policy Recom- me~ations; and author of numerous journal articles and book chapters. LESLIE BURL McLEMORE is professor of political science, dean of the grad- uate school, and director of research administration as well as the founding chair of the Department of Political Science at Jackson State University. He has degrees from Rust College, Atlanta University, and the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. His research involves southern politics and the modern-day civil rights movement. His current research deals with Fannie Lou Hamer, a leader of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and member of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee; he is also conducting research on the campaigns of the Reverend Jesse Jackson. Mc- Lemore has served as president of the National Conference of Black Political 579

OCR for page 570
A COMMON DESTINY: BLACKS AND AMERICAN SOCIETY Scientists and as vice president and program chair of the Southern Political Science Association. He has written numerous articles on blacks and black politics, including "Election Laws and Their Manipulation to Exclude Mi- nority Voters: A Response," "Black Politics: The View from the Readers," and "Black Independent Power Politics in Mississippi: Constants and Chal- lenges. " MARY BETH MOORE is vice president and director of communication for PATH (Program for Appropriate Technology in Health), where she oversees the development of health and family planning information and education and communication materials to be used with disadvantaged populations worldwide. She has an M.P.H. degree from the University of Michigan and an M.S. degree in health from Michigan State University. She has worked with the national headquarters of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America and conducted research for the Population Council's Biomedical Division, the Smithsonian Institution, Michigan State University, and the University of Michigan. She also developed a health curriculum for the Michigan Migrant Education Program and worked on clinic evaluation for the Michigan Department of Public Health. ELEANOR HOLMES NORTON is professor of law at Georgetown Univer- sity Law Center. She has a B.A. degree from Antioch College, an M.A. degree in American studies from Yale University, and an LL.B. degree from Yale Law School. From 1977 to 1981 she was chair of the Equal Employ- ment Opportunity Commission. She has worked for the American Civil Liberties Union, the Commission on Human Rights of the City of New York, and the Urban Institute and has taught at the New York University Law School. Her work is focused on employment and labor force matters, including labor-management relations, discrimination law, and affirmative action as well as labor law and negotiations. Other areas of interest include women's rights, comparable worth, and racial discrimination. She is the coauthor of Sex Discrimination and the Imp: Causes and Remedies and is writing a book about the development and impact of antidiscrimination law and affirmative action remedies. She has received more than 33 honorary degrees and serves on a variety of boards, including those of the Rockefeller Foun- dation, the Yale Corporation, the Martin Luther King, Ir., Center for Social Change, the Metropolitan Life Insurance Co., Pitney Bowes, and the Stan- ley Works. JOHN U. OGBU is a Nigerian-born anthropologist and a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, where he received his degrees. He has been a distinguished visiting professor at the University of Delaware and New Mexico State University and a visiting scholar at Morehouse College and the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He is a fellow of the American Anthropological Association, the American Association for the Advance- ment of Science, the International African Institute, and the Royal Anthro 580

OCR for page 570
APPENDIX B polog~cal Institute. He has served on several national and international advi- sory boards, including National Research Council committees and panels and is a member of the governing council of the Society for Research in Child Development. He received a distinguished scholar award from the American Educational Research Association in 1985 and is the author of two award-winning books and numerous articles on minority education. His current research is a comparative study of community forces affecting the school adjustment and academic achievement of immigrant and nonimmi . . grant mmonty stuc tents. DELORES L. PARRON is associate director for special populations at the National Institute of Mental Health. She has a Ph.D. degree in social policy and research from Catholic University of America. Previously, she was asso- ciate director of the Division of Mental Health and Behavioral Medicine of the Institute of Medicine, a staff member of the President's Commission on Mental Health, and assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Howard University College of Medicine. She is coeditor With David A. Hamburg and Glen R. Elliot) of Health and Behavior, Frontiers of Research in the Biobeh~oral Sciences and (with Frederic Solomon) of Mental Health Sauces in PA y Care Stings. THOMAS F. PETTIGREW is professor of social psychology at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and the University of Amsterdam in the Nether- lands. He has M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in social psychology from Harvard University, where he taught for 23 years. He has specialized in race relations throughout his career and conducted research in South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the Netherlands as well as the United States. He has been active as a consultant and court witness in school desegregation cases, and in 1967 he was a member of the White House Task Force on Education. He is a past president of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, a Guggenheim Fellow, and a fellow of the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study. For his research in race relations, he has received the Sydney Spivack Award, the Kurt Lewin Award, and the Gordon Allport Prize. His books, monographs, and numerous articles have focused on the role of social psy- chological factors in race relations. DOROTHY e RICE is professor in residence in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, with joint appointments in the Institute for Health and Aging and the Institute for Health Policy Studies at the University of Cali- fornia, San Francisco. She has a B.A. degree in economics from the Univer- sity of Wisconsin and an honorary Sc.D. degree from the College of Medi- cine and Dentistry of New Jersey. From 1977 to 1982 she served as director of the National Center for Health Statistics in the U,S. Department of Health and Human Services, and she previously served as deputy assistant commissioner for research and statistics of the Social Security Administra- tion. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine and a fellow of the 581

OCR for page 570
A COMMON DESTINY: BLACKS AND AMERICAN SOCIETY American Statistical Association and of the American Public Health Associ- ation. She is a member of several national advisory councils on aging, statis- tics, the elderly, and program evaluation and methodology. Her major re- search interests include health statistics, the impact of an aging population, cost of illness studies, and the economics of medical care, and she is the author of more than 100 published articles and monographs. LEE NELKENS ROBINS is an epidemiologist and professor of sociologr in the Department of Psychiatry at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis. She has B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees, all in sociology, from Harvard University. She has studied the development of substance abuse and conduct problems from early school years through young adulthood in young black men; the psychiatric problems of black adolescents in inner-city health clinics; the post-Vietnam drug use and adjustment of black and white enlisted men; and the prevalence of specific types of psychiatric disorders in the general population of blacks and whites through the Epidemiological Catchment Area project of the National Institute of Mental Health. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and of the World Health Organization's Expert Advisory Panel on Mental Health. She has served as a member of committees of the National Research Council and the IOM. STEVEN J. ROSENSTONE is professor of political science and program director at the Center for Political Studies, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan. He has an A.B. degree from Washington University, St. Louis, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in political science from the Univer- sity of California, Berkeley. His research interests include elections and vot- ing, political participation and political parties, public opinion, and political rules and norms. He is currently a coprincipal investigator of the National Election Studies. He is a member of the advisory council of the Latino National Political Survey and on the editorial board of several scholarly journals. His published works include Who Votes? (as coauthor); Third Parties in Amenca; Recasting Residential Elections; and Political Participation of Latent Americans. ELSIE L. SCOTT is executive director of the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives. She has a B.A. degree from Southern Univer- sity, an M.A. degree from the University of Iowa, and a Ph.D. degree from Atlanta University, all in political science. She has held academic positions at Howard University, North Carolina Central University, St. Augustine's College, and Rutgers University. She has been a member of the curriculum advisory committee of the State Department's Diplomatic Security Antiter- rorism Program; the advisory committee for state and local training of the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center; and the advisory board of the National Institute Against Prejudice and Violence. She is a past president of the National Conference of Black Political Scientists. She is the author of 582

OCR for page 570
APPENDIX B several books on blacks and violence, including Violence Against Blacks in the United States, 1979-1981 (~1983~. JAMES TOBIN is Sterling Professor of Economics Emeritus at Yale Univer- sity. He has been on the faculty at Yale since 1950 and retired from his leaching position in 1988. He has an A.B. degree from Harvard College and a Ph.D. degree from Harvard University, both in economics. His major research interests have been macroeconomics, monetary theory and policy, fiscal policy and public finance, consumption and saving, unemployment and inflation, portfolio theory and asset markets, and econometrics. He was a junior fellow of the Society of Fellows for 3 years in 1947-1950, the last of which he spent at the Department of Applied Economics at the University of Cambridge in England. He was a member of the Council of Economic Advisers in 1961-1962 and is a past president of the Econometric Society, the American Economic Association, and the Eastem Economics Associa- tion. He received the John Bates Clark Medal of the American Economic Association and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. In 1981 he received the Nobel Prize in economics. He is author or editor of 13 books and more than 300 articles and has written for both professional and lay audiences. PHYLLIS A. WALLACE is professor of management, emerita, at the Sloan School of Management of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She received a Ph.D. degree in economics from Yale University. Her service on panels for the federal government includes the Minimum Wage Study Com- mission and the President's Pay Advisory Committee. She is a past president of the Industrial Relations Research Association. During the past two dec- ades she has been a researcher and consultant on equal employment oppor- tunity, employment and training programs, and development and manage- ment of human resources. She is author or editor of six books and numerous articles on these topics. NANCY J. WEISS is professor of history and dean of the College at Prince- ton University, where she has been on the faculty since 1969. She has a B.A. degree from Smith College and M.A. and P.D. degrees in American history from Harvard University. Her research focuses on black history and twenti- eth century American history. She is the author of The National Urban l - Be, 1910-1940; Farewell to the Party of Lincoln: Black Politics in the A' of FOR, and Whitney M. ran,, Jr., am the Sale for Call Rights. ROBIN M. W! tLIAMS, ~ R., is Henry Scarborough Professor of Social Sci- ence Emeritus at Cornell University. He has a Ph.D. degree from Harvard University. He has served as consultant to many governmental agencies and voluntary associations. He is past president and secretary of the American Sociological Association. He is a member of the National Academy of Sci- ences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American 583

OCR for page 570
A COMMON DESTINY: BLACKS AND AMERICAN SOCIETY Philosophical Society. For half a century he has been concerned with inter- group relations in American society, in research and in public service. He has written extensively on intergroup relations, conflict, American institu- tions, values, and social change. In 1988 he received the Commonwealth Award for a career of distinguished achievement in sociology. He is the author of several books on racial and ethnic relations, including The Redact of Intercrop Tensions, Stranders Next Door, and M?~t?'al Accommodation. WILLIAM J ULIUS WILSON is the Lucy Flower Distinguished Service Pro- fessor of Sociology and Public Policy and former chair of the Department of Sociology at the University of Chicago. He has a Ph.D. degree in sociology from Washington State University. He has also taught at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He is a member of the oversight body of several organizations, including the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, the Russell Sage Foundation, Spellman College, and the Chicago Urban League. He is also a member of several national advisory committees. He is the author of Power, Racism, and Viler: Race Relations in Theoretical and Sociohistorical Perspectives; The Declining S,igni~cance of Race: Blacks and Cha~i~ American Infusions; and the award-winning The Truly Dishpan Wed: The Inner City, The U - recess, and Public Policy; and he has authored or coauthored numerous books and articles. He serves and has served on the editorial boards of several professional journals. He received a MacArthur Fellowship in 1987. RAYMON D E. WOLFI NGER is professor of political science and director of the State Data Program at the University of California, Berkeley. He has a B.A. degree from the University of California, Berkeley, an M.A. degree in political science from the University of Illinois, and a Ph.D. degree in polit- ical science from Yale University. In the 1960s he served as an aide to several legislators, including Senator Frank Church and Senator Hubert H. Hum- phrey, focusing primarily on the Civil Rights Act of 1964. He also taught at Stanford University. He is a former chair of the board of overseers of the University of Michigan's National Election Studies, the only continuing national survey of Americans' political views and voting behavior. He is president of the Consortium of Social Science Associations and of the West- ern Political Science Association and a member of the board of directors of the Southwest Voter Research Institute. He is the author or coauthor of books and articles on venous aspects of minority politics and political partic- ipation, including Who Votes?. 584