Cover Image

PAPERBACK
$54.00



View/Hide Left Panel

related activities, and raise issues that go far beyond the focus of the studies in this volume. Nevertheless, in the absence of more effective policies within the United States to address the legitimate concerns and needs of the domestic economic “losers” from globalization, political resistance to policies seeking to further liberalize international flows of trade and investment seems likely to grow. And such political resistance has the potential to undercut the globalization in innovation-related activities that has proven highly beneficial to U.S. and non-U.S. citizens alike.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Research for this chapter was supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Ewing M. Kauffman Foundation, and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. A portion of David Mowery’s research was supported by the National Science Foundation (SES-0531184).

REFERENCES

Bhagwati, J., A. Panagariya, and T. N. Srinavasan. (2004). The muddles over outsourcing. Journal of Economic Perspectives 18(4):93-114.

Branstetter, L., and C. F. Foley. (2007). Facts and Fallacies about U.S. FDI in China. National Bureau of Economic Research Working Paper #13470.

Freeman, R. B. (2005). Does Globalization of the Scientific/Engineering Workforce Threaten U.S. Economic Leadership. National Bureau of Economics Working Paper 11457, pp. 1-47.

Lohr, S. (2007). Parsing the truths about visas for tech workers. New York Times. April 15.

Mowery, D. C., and T. S. Simcoe. (2002). Is the Internet a U.S. invention?—An economic and technological history of computer networking. Research Policy 31:1369-1387.

National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, Institute of Medicine. Committee on Prospering in the Global Economy of the 21st Century. (2006). Rising above the Gathering Storm: Energizing and Employing America for a Brighter Economic Future. Washington, D.C.: The National Academies Press.

Thursby, J., and M. Thursby. (2006). Where is the new science in corporate R&D. Science 314: 1547-1548.

Turner, S. D. (2006). Broadband reality check II: The truth behind America’s digital decline. Consumers Union 1-44.

Vernon, R. (1966). International investment and international trade in the product cycle. Quarterly Journal of Economics 80:190-207.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement