B
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Craig Marks (NAE), Chair, is a member of the Board of Trustees of Altarum, a not-for-profit research firm focused on shifting health-care spending in the United States toward systems that are centered on the value of health. For 27 years he worked at General Motors in engineering and management positions. He subsequently became vice president of Engineering and Technology for the TRW Automotive Sector and then Vice President of Technology and Productivity for the Allied Signal Automotive Sector. In the latter position he headed an automotive R&D center and was responsible for the staff functions of manufacturing, quality, health, safety and environment, and communications. After retiring, Dr. Marks became an adjunct professor at the University of Michigan, with a joint appointment in the College of Engineering and the School of Business Administration, where he helped found the Joel D. Tauber Manufacturing Institute. He has served on a number of NRC committees including as chairman, Committee on Review of the Research Program of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles, and chairman, Committee for the Review of the Intelligent Vehicle Initiative—Phase 2. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and the Engineering Society of Detroit. Dr. Marks holds B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering from the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.


Peter Beardmore (NAE) was formerly director, Ford Research Laboratory, Ford Motor Company, prior to his retirement in August 2000. His primary research

Note: NAE = member, National Academy of Engineering.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 125
B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members craig marks (Nae), Chair, is a member of the Board of Trustees of Altarum, a not-for-profit research firm focused on shifting health-care spending in the United States toward systems that are centered on the value of health. For 27 years he worked at General Motors in engineering and management positions. He subsequently became vice president of Engineering and Technology for the TRW Automotive Sector and then Vice President of Technology and Productivity for the Allied Signal Automotive Sector. In the latter position he headed an automotive R&D center and was responsible for the staff functions of manufacturing, quality, health, safety and environment, and communications. After retiring, Dr. Marks became an adjunct professor at the University of Michigan, with a joint appoint- ment in the College of Engineering and the School of Business Administration, where he helped found the Joel D. Tauber Manufacturing Institute. He has served on a number of NRC committees including as chairman, Committee on Review of the Research Program of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles, and chairman, Committee for the Review of the Intelligent Vehicle Initiative—Phase 2. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and the Engineering Society of Detroit. Dr. Marks holds B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering from the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. Peter Beardmore (Nae) was formerly director, Ford Research Laboratory, Ford Motor Company, prior to his retirement in August 2000. His primary research Note: NAE = member, National Academy of Engineering. 

OCR for page 125
 APPENDiX b interests are the deformation and fracture of materials, including extensive re- search experience in metals, polymers, and composites, and he has published over 83 technical articles. He is a recognized international authority on composite materials and on the application of new materials to automotive structures. His management responsibilities at Ford covered a wide area of research activities relative to the automotive industry, including materials, environmental chemistry, sensor technologies, automotive catalyst development, and the application of modern analytical techniques. He is a member of the American Society for Ma- terials (ASM), The Metallurgical Society (TMS) of AIME, and the Engineering Society of Detroit (ESD). He was elected a fellow of ASM in 1989 and a fellow of ESD in 1991. In 1992, he was elected a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He holds a B.Met. in metallurgy from the University of Sheffield and a Ph.D. in metallurgy from the University of Liverpool. david l. Bodde serves as a professor and senior fellow at Clemson University. There, he directs innovation and strategy at Clemson’s International Center for Automotive Research. Prior to joining Clemson University, Dr. Bodde held the Charles N. Kimball Chair in Technology and Innovation at the University of Missouri in Kansas City. Dr. Bodde serves on the board of directors of several energy and technology companies, including Great Plains Energy and the Com- merce Funds. His executive experience includes vice president, Midwest Research Institute; assistant director of the Congressional Budget Office; and deputy as- sistant secretary in the U.S. Department of Energy. Dr. Bodde frequently testifies before congressional committees. He was once a soldier and served in the Army in Vietnam. He has a doctorate in business administration from Harvard University, M.S. degrees in nuclear engineering (1972) and management (1973), and a B.S. from the United States Military Academy. Glenn a. eisman is a research professor in materials science and engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N.Y. He is also adjunct professor at the graduate school of Union University (Schenectady, N.Y.); principal partner of Eisman Technology Consultants, LLC; and managing partner of H2 Pump LLC (Niskayuna, N.Y.). His previous positions include chief technology officer, Plug Power, Inc.; technical leader, The Advanced Materials Program, Central Research and New Businesses, The Dow Chemical Company; project leader, Discovery Research R&D and Inorganic Chemicals Research, The Dow Chemical Company; and Robert A. Welch Research Fellow, The University of Texas-Austin. Dr. Eis- man has extensive experience in R&D and product development on fuel cells, hydrogen technologies, electrochemical engineering, physical and inorganic solid state chemistry, and new technology commercialization and business develop- ment. He received the Inventor of the Year Award from Dow Chemical (1993) and is a member of the Electrochemical Society. He received his bachelor’s degree in

OCR for page 125
 APPENDiX b chemistry from Temple University and a Ph.D. in physical inorganic chemistry from Northeastern University. W. robert epperly is a consultant. From 1994 to 1997, he was president of Cata- lytica Advanced Technologies, Inc., a company developing new catalytic technol- ogies for the petroleum and chemical industries. Prior to joining Catalytica, he was CEO of Fuel Tech N.V., a company specializing in new products for combustion and air pollution control. Earlier, he was general manager of Exxon Corporate Research. While at Exxon Research and Engineering Co., he was also general manager of the Synthetic Fuels Department, where he was responsible for the engineering of commercial projects, and manager of the Baytown Research and Development Division, where he was responsible for coal conversion research. Earlier, he was director of the Fuels Research Laboratory, responsible for R&D on Exxon’s fuels products. He is a fellow in the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and a past recipient of the AIChE’s National Award in Chemical Engi- neering Practice. He has authored or coauthored over 50 publications, including two books, and has 38 U.S. patents. He has broad experience in the conversion of fossil resources to alternative gaseous and liquid fuels, petroleum fuels, catalysis, air pollution control, and R&D management. Since 1981, he has participated on nine committees at the National Research Council, including the Committee on Alternatives and Strategies for Future Hydrogen Production and Use. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees in chemical engineering from Virginia Tech. david e. Foster is the Phil and Jean Myers Professor of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, and former director of the Engine Research Center, which has won two center of excellence competitions for engine research and has extensive facilities for research on internal combustion engines. A member of the faculty at the University of Wisconsin since he completed his Ph.D., Dr. Foster teaches and conducts research in thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, inter- nal combustion engines, and emission formation processes. His work has focused specifically on perfecting the application of optical diagnostics in engine systems and the incorporation of simplified or phenomenological models of emission for- mation processes into engineering simulations. He has published more than 70 technical articles in this field throughout the world and for leading societies in this country. He is a recipient of the Ralph R. Teetor Award, the Forest R. McFarland Award, and the Lloyd L. Withrow Distinguished Speaker Award of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), and he is an SAE fellow and has been awarded the ASME Honda Gold Medal. He has served on a number of NRC committees, including the Committee on Review of the Research Program of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles. He is a registered professional engineer in the State of Wisconsin and has won departmental, engineering society, and university awards for his classroom teaching. He received a B.S. and an M.S. in mechanical

OCR for page 125
 APPENDiX b engineering from the University of Wisconsin and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineer- ing from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). John B. heywood (Nae) is Sun Jae Professor of Mechanical Engineering at MIT and director of the Sloan Automotive Laboratory. Dr. Heywood’s research has focused on understanding and explaining the processes that govern the operation and design of internal combustion engines and their fuels requirements. Major research activities include engine combustion, pollutant formation, operating and emissions characteristics and fuel requirements of automotive engines, and assessing future propulsion system developments. He has served on a number of NRC committees, including the Committee on Review of the Research Pro- gram of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles. He has consulted for many companies in the automotive and petroleum industries and for government organizations. He has received many awards, from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the British Institution of Mechanical Engineers, and the Society of Automotive Engineers for his research contributions. He has a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from MIT, a Sc.D. from Cambridge University, and honorary doctorates from Chalmers University of Technology (Sweden) and City University (U.K.). harold h. Kung is professor of chemical and biological engineering at North- western University. His areas of research include surface chemistry, catalysis, and chemical reaction engineering. His professional experience includes work as a research chemist at E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc. He is a recipient of the P.H. Emmett Award and the Robert Burwell Lectureship Award from the North American Catalysis Society, the Herman Pines Award of the Chicago Ca- talysis Club, the Cross-Canada Lectureship from the Catalysis Division of the Chemical Institute of Canada, and is a Catalysis Society of South Africa eminent visitor. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Sci- ence, and editor of Applied Catalysis A: General. He has a Ph.D. in chemistry from Northwestern University. James J. macKenzie is a senior fellow in the World Resources Institute’s (WRI’s) Climate, Energy, and Pollution program. Prior to joining WRI, Dr. MacKenzie was a senior staff scientist, Union of Concerned Scientists; a senior staff member for energy, President’s Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ); and a member of the joint scientific staff of the Massachusetts and national Audubon Societies. Much of his recent research and analysis has focused on transportation technolo- gies and the impact of the transportation system on the environment. He is co- author (transportation chapter) of frontiers of Sustainability: Enironmentally Sound Agriculture, forestry, Transportation, and Power Production; author of Climate Protection and the National interest; Oil as a finite resource: When is Global Production Likely to Peak?; and The Keys to the Car, Electric and hydro-

OCR for page 125
 APPENDiX b gen Vehicles for the st Century. He is also co-author of Car Trouble, a book on the impacts of cars on the American scene, and of several major WRI reports, including an analysis of the subsidies for motor vehicles in the United States, the impacts of global motor vehicle use on climate change, and the effects of multiple air pollutants on U.S. forests and crops. He has also completed a policy report exploring the linkages among the problems of climate change, air pollution, and national energy security. Dr. MacKenzie received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Minnesota and completed postgraduate work at Los Alamos and Argonne National Laboratories and MIT before joining the Audubon Society. christopher l. magee (Nae) is professor, Engineering Systems Division, Mas- sachusetts Institute of Technology, and co-director, Engineering Design and Ad- vanced Manufacturing for the MIT-Portugal Program. Prior to joining MIT, he held a number of positions at Ford Motor Company, including director, Vehicle Systems Engineering; director, Advanced Vehicle Engineering; manager, Materi- als Science Department; senior research scientist, Metallurgy Department; and executive director, Programs and Advanced Engineering, with global responsibil- ity for all major technically deep areas involved in Ford’s Product Development Organization. He has expertise in such areas as phase transformations, plastic deformation, materials strength, large-scale collapse of engineering structures, product development, automotive design, value engineering, and simultaneous manufacturing/product engineering. He has made important contributions to the understanding of the transformation, structure, and strength of ferrous materials and to lightweight materials development and implementation; he pioneered ex- perimental work on high-rate structural collapse aimed at vehicle crashworthiness; and he adapted systems engineering to the modern automotive design process. His recent research has emphasized innovation and technology development in complex systems. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering for contributions to advanced vehicle development, was a Ford Technical Fellow (1996), and is a fellow of ASM. He has a B.S., an M.S., and a Ph.D. in metallurgy and materials science from the Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie Mellon University) and an M.B.A. from Michigan State University. robert J. Nowak is a private consultant. He was a program manager at the De- fense Advanced Research Projects Agency and the Office of Naval Research. He has directed and supported research in fundamental electrochemistry, fuel cells, batteries, capacitors, energy harvesting, fuel processing, thermal energy conver- sion, micro-engines, hydrogen storage, biofuel cells, sonoluminescence, and biomolecular motors. He recently served on an EPRI committee to evaluate direct carbon fuel cell technologies, the NRC Committee on Portable Energy Sources for the Objective Force Warrior, and the NRC Panel on Benefits of Fuel Cell R&D. He received his B.A. and M.S. degrees in chemistry from Oakland University and his Ph.D. degree in chemistry from the University of Cincinnati. He was a

OCR for page 125
0 APPENDiX b postdoctoral research associate with Professor Royce W. Murray at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and he was selected as NRC postdoctoral fel- low at the Naval Research Laboratory, where he continued his research activities in conducting polymer electrochemistry and chemically modified electrodes as a staff scientist and section head. Dr. Nowak received the Secretary of Defense Meritorious Civilian Service Award in 2002 for his efforts in developing portable power sources for the military. michael P. ramage (Nae) is retired executive vice president, ExxonMobil Re- search and Engineering Company. Previously he was executive vice president and chief technology officer, Mobil Oil Corporation. Dr. Ramage held a number of positions at Mobil, including research associate, manager of process research and development, general manager of exploration and producing research and tech- nical service, vice president of engineering, and president of Mobil Technology Company. He has broad experience in many aspects of the petroleum and chemi- cal industries. He has served on a number of university visiting committees and was a member of the Government-University Industrial Research Roundtable. He was a director of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and is a member of several professional organizations. Dr. Ramage chaired the recent NRC report The hydrogen Economy: Opportunities, Costs, barriers, and research Needs. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has served on the NAE Council. Dr. Ramage has B.S., M.S., Ph.D., and HDR degrees in chemical engineering from Purdue University. Vernon P. roan is retired director of the Center for Advanced Studies in En- gineering and professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Florida, where he has been a faculty member for more than 30 years. Since 1994, he has also been the director of the University of Florida Fuel Cell Research and Training Laboratory. Previously, he was a senior design engineer with Pratt and Whitney Aircraft. Dr. Roan, who has more than 25 years of research and development experience, is currently working as a consultant to Pratt & Whitney on advanced gas-turbine propulsion systems. His research at the University of Florida has involved both spark-ignition and diesel engines operating with many alternative fuels and advanced concepts. With groups of engineering students, he designed and built a 20-passenger diesel-electric bus for the Florida Department of Trans- portation and a hybrid-electric urban car using an internal combustion engine and lead-acid batteries. He has been a consultant to the Jet Propulsion Labora- tory, monitoring its electric and hybrid vehicle programs. He has organized and chaired two national meetings on advanced vehicle technologies and a national seminar on the development of fuel-cell-powered automobiles and has published numerous technical papers on innovative propulsion systems. He was one of the four members of the Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Panel of the California Air Resources Board (CARB), which issued a report in May 1998 on the status and

OCR for page 125
 APPENDiX b outlook for fuel cells for transportation applications. He is currently a member of the Expert Panel on Zero Emission Vehicles for CARB. Dr. Roan received a B.S. in aeronautical engineering, an M.S. in engineering from the University of Florida, and a Ph.D. in engineering from the University of Illinois. Bernard robertson (Nae) is president of BIR1, LLC, an engineering consul- tancy specializing in transportation and energy matters that he founded in January 2004, upon his retirement from DaimlerChrysler Corporation. During the latter part of his 38-year career in the automotive industry, Mr. Robertson was elected an officer of Chrysler Corporation in February 1992. He was appointed senior vice president when Chrysler Corporation and Daimler-Benz AG merged in No- vember 1998, and was named senior vice president of engineering technologies and regulatory affairs in January 2001. In his last position, he led the Liberty and Technical Affairs Research group, Advanced Technology Management and FreedomCAR activities, and hybrid electric, battery electric, fuel cell, and military vehicle development. In addition, he was responsible for regulatory analysis and compliance for safety and emissions. Mr. Robertson holds an M.B.A. degree from Michigan State University, a master’s degree in automotive engineering from the Chrysler Institute, and a master’s degree in mechanical sciences from Cambridge University, England. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the Institute of Mechanical Engineers (U.K.), a chartered engineer (U.K.), and a fellow of the Society of Automotive Engineers. r. rhoads stephenson is currently a technology consultant. Previously, he held a number of positions at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), and Martin Marietta Corpo- ration. At JPL, these included deputy director and acting director, Technology and Applications Programs; manager, Electronics and Control Division; deputy manager, Control and Energy Conversion Division; and manager of the Systems Analysis Section. He also served as associate administrator for R&D at NHTSA, and while at Martin Marietta Corporation worked on energy conversion devices for space power. He has been a consultant to the Motor Vehicle Fire Research Institute, has been providing peer reviews of automotive safety issues, and has recently published a number of papers on crash-induced fire safety issues with motor vehicles, including hydrogen-fueled vehicles. He brings extensive expertise in vehicle safety analysis, advanced technology systems, energy conversion tech- nologies, and energy and environmental analysis. He has B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering from Carnegie Mellon University. Kathleen c. Taylor (Nae) is retired director of the Materials and Processes Laboratory at General Motors Research and Development and Planning Center in Warren, Michigan. Dr. Taylor was simultaneously chief scientist for General Mo- tors of Canada, Ltd., in Oshawa, Ontario. Earlier Dr. Taylor was department head

OCR for page 125
 APPENDiX b for physics and physical chemistry and department head for environmental sci- ences. She serves at the Catalysis Society, the Board of Directors of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, the DOE Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee, and was formerly a member of the NRC Board of Energy and Environmental Systems. Dr. Taylor was awarded the Garvan Medal from the American Chemical Society. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a foreign fellow of the Indian National Academy of Engineering. She is a fellow of SAE International and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She has been president of the Materials Research Society and chair of the board of directors of the Gordon Research Conferences. She has expertise in R&D manage- ment, fuel cells, batteries, catalysis, exhaust emissions control, and automotive materials. She received an A.B. in chemistry from Douglass College and a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Northwestern University. Giri Venkataramanan is associate professor, Department of Electrical and Com- puter Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, and associate director, Wis- consin Electric Machines and Power Electronics Consortium. Previous positions include associate professor, Montana State University, Bozeman; visiting research associate, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; and visiting researcher, CNPq, Brazilian National Council for Development of Science and Technology, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil. His fields of interest include electrical power conversion, AC power flow control, design of power converters, distributed gen- eration, power converter architecture, and power converter packaging. Specific research projects focus on characterization of power semiconductor devices and components, development of novel power converters and control strategies, physi- cal realization and packaging, mitigation of converter-induced harmonics, and control of electromagnetic interference. He is active in a number of IEEE techni- cal forums, and served as chair, IEEE Montana Section. He participated in an NRC workshop held by the Committee on Assessment of Combat Hybrid Power Systems. He has a B.E. from the University of Madras, India, in electrical and electronics engineering, an M.S. from the California Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, in electrical engineering. Brijesh Vyas is currently distinguished member of technical staff in the Nanofab- rication Research Department at Bell Laboratories–Lucent Technologies. Earlier he was the technical manager of the Energy Conversion Technology Group at Bell Laboratories. He also held positions at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Technical University of Denmark. His primary responsibility is the applica- tion of electrochemical technologies to nanofabrication. He has been responsible for R&D of advanced materials and technologies for high-energy batteries for portable applications and forward-looking work on energy storage systems for standby applications including batteries, fuel cells, flywheels, and photovoltaic devices. He has led efforts on R&D for capacitors and for rechargeable lithium,

OCR for page 125
 APPENDiX b nickel cadmium, nickel metal hydride, and lead acid batteries. In addition he has been responsible for battery technology transfer to manufacturing and interacted with application engineers and marketing and legal organizations. He is a recipient of the Sam Tour award by the American Society of Testing and Materials and is a member of the Electrochemical Society. He served on the NRC Committee to Review the U.S. Advanced Battery Consortium’s electric vehicle battery R&D project selection process. He holds a B.Tech. in metallurgical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology–Bombay and a Ph. D. in materials science from the State University of New York, Stony Brook.