C
Committee and Staff Biographies

Dr. David H. Bromwich is a Professor with the Atmospheric Sciences Program of the Department of Geography and a Senior Research Scientist with the Polar Meteorology Group of the Byrd Polar Research Center at the The Ohio State University. Dr. Bromwich received his Ph.D. in Meteorology from the University of Wisconsin, a M.Sc. in Meteorology from the University of Melbourne, Australia, a Diploma of Meteorology, from the Bureau of Meteorology, Australia, and a B.Sc. Honors in Physics from the University of Sydney, Australia. His research centers on the roles of the polar regions in global climate variability and change using both numerical modeling and observational approaches. He currently serves as a member of the Polar Research Board and has previously served on the following NRC Committees: Planning Committee for the International Polar Year, Committee on Geophysical and Environmental Data, and the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research.


Dr. Aiguo Dai is a Scientist with the Climate and Global Dynamics Division at NCAR. He received his Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science from Columbia University and NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies. His research includes climate variability and change, such as changes in precipitation, cloudiness, humidity, droughts, river run-off, and diurnal temperature range by analyzing various climate data. He also has evaluated climate models and analyzed climate model simulations. Dr. Dai has done research and published on many other areas, including ENSO-induced climate variations, diurnal variability of the climate system (such as tidal variations in surface pressure fields, diurnal variations in winds and divergence, diurnal variations in precipitation, cloudiness, and convection), climate-biosphere interactions, and climatic impacts on the global carbon cycle and trace gases (CO2, CH4, etc.) emissions.



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C Committee and Staff Biographies Dr. David H. Bromwich is a Professor with the Atmospheric Sciences Program of the Department of Geography and a Senior Research Scientist with the Polar Meteorology Group of the Byrd Polar Research Center at the The Ohio State University. Dr. Bromwich received his Ph.D. in Meteorology from the University of Wisconsin, a M.Sc. in Meteorology from the University of Melbourne, Australia, a Diploma of Meteorology, from the Bureau of Meteorology, Australia, and a B.Sc. Honors in Physics from the University of Sydney, Australia. His research centers on the roles of the polar regions in global climate variability and change using both numerical modeling and observational approaches. He currently serves as a member of the Polar Research Board and has previously served on the following NRC Committees: Planning Committee for the International Polar Year, Committee on Geophysical and Environmental Data, and the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research. Dr. Aiguo Dai is a Scientist with the Climate and Global Dynamics Division at NCAR. He received his Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science from Columbia University and NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies. His research includes climate variability and change, such as changes in precipitation, cloudiness, humidity, droughts, river run-off, and diurnal temperature range by analyzing various climate data. He also has evaluated climate models and analyzed climate model simulations. Dr. Dai has done research and published on many other areas, including ENSO-induced climate variations, diurnal variability of the climate system (such as tidal variations in surface pressure fields, diurnal variations in winds and divergence, diurnal variations in precipitation, cloudiness, and convection), climate-biosphere interactions, and climatic impacts on the global carbon cycle and trace gases (CO2, CH4, etc.) emissions. 54

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Appendix C 55 Dr. Ioana M. Dima is a Research Scientist at AIR-Worlwide, a Boston based research and modeling company. Dr. Dima’s general interests are in the general circulation of the atmosphere, climate variability and climate change. Her research has focused on the low latitude variability in the upper troposphere, with emphasis on the mean meridional circulation, angular momentum budget, eddy and transient momentum fluxes and the horizontal and vertical structure of the tropical stationary waves, both in anomaly and climatology fields. Special emphasis was given to variability related to the annual cycle, ENSO and MJO. Presently she is interested in investigating the climatological interaction between smaller scale (tropical cyclones) and larger scale (Equatorial Stationary Waves, El Nino/Southern Oscillation, etc) patterns of variability in the tropics. Other interests include low latitude troposphere-to-stratosphere exchanges and tropics- extratropics interactions. Dr. Dima received her PhD in Atmospheric Sciences from the University of Washington, Seattle, her MS in Atmospheric Sciences from the University of Washington, Seattle, and her MS in Atmospheric Physics from the University of Bucharest. Dr. John W. Nielsen-Gammon is a professor of Meteorology and Texas State Climatologist at the Department of Atmospheric Sciences with Texas A&M University. Dr. Nielsen-Gammon received his Ph.D. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Meteorology in 1990, a S.M. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Meteorology in 1987 and a S.B. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Earth and Planetary Sciences in 1984. His professional interests include synoptic-scale dynamic meteorology, weather forecasting and numerical weather prediction, air pollution meteorology, dynamics of weakly- forced precipitating systems, and land surface inhomogeneities and local circulations. Much of Dr. Nielsen-Gammon's recent work in air pollution meteorology and as Texas State Climatologist has involved issues of data quality and consistency for surface and upper-air measurements in inhomogeneous networks. Dr. Benjamin Kirtman is an Associate Research Scientist with COLA. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Maryland. Dr. Kirtman is working on the development of simple and complex coupled ocean atmosphere general circulation models which are used to investigate the predictability of the coupled system on interannual and intraseasonal time scales, to study the influence of tropical predictability on mid-latitude predictability and to assess how the annual cycle affects intraseasonal and interannual predictability. Current areas of interest include: El Nino prediction, dynamics and low frequency variations; impact of atmospheric stochastic forcing on coupled climate variability; El Nino-Monsoon interactions; and the maintenance of the inter-tropical convergence zone. Dr. Robert Miller is a Professor at the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University. Dr. Miller’s current research includes application of

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56 Review of CCSP SAP 1.3 methods developed in meteorology and engineering to ocean prediction; validation of these methods with observed and computer-synthesized data; and application to prediction of transient currents in the North Pacific. Dr. Miller received a MS from California Institute of Technology in Applied Mathematics and a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley in Mathematics. Dr. Andrew W. Robertson came to the International Research Institute for Climate Prediction (IRI) in November 2001 from the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at UCLA, where he was principal investigator on NOAA and DOE research grants concerned with climate variability on interannual-to-interdecadal time scales. His work at UCLA focused on the phenomenology of climate variations (intrinsic modes of atmospheric variability, the impact of SST variations, ocean- atmosphere interaction) using data and GCM experiments, and applications- relevant research (planetary-flow regimes and local daily weather, streamflow predictability). After graduating from the University of Leeds, U.K., with a B.Sc. in geography and mathematics, Dr. Robertson received his Ph.D. in atmospheric dynamics from the University of Reading in 1984 under the supervision of Professor Brian Hoskins. He has held postdoctoral and research positions at the Universities of Paris and Munich. Dr. Robertson is interested in the mechanisms, particularly ocean-atmosphere interaction, that give rise to predictable aspects of interannual-to-interdecadal regional climate variability, and the use of GCM experiments to isolate them. He is interested in probabilistic modeling of relationships between local daily weather statistics and large-scale climate processes. At IRI, Robertson will seek to advance understanding of short-term regional climate predictability and to develop useful seasonal-to-interannual predictions of applications-relevant quantities with small spatial and temporal scales. He will work to forge the link between climate research and its application. Maria Uhle has been a Program Officer with the Polar Research Board at the National Research Council since April of 2005. Prior to joining the NRC, she was the Jones Assistant Professor of Environmental Organic Geochemistry in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at the University of Tennessee. At UT, Dr. Uhle mentored several graduate students in various scientific disciplines including Quaternary climate studies, salt marsh ecology, reconstruction of biomass burning events throughout geologic history, organic contaminate remediation and Antarctic biogeochemistry. Dr Uhle received her B.S. from Bates College, M.S. from the University of Massachusetts and Ph.D. from the University of Virginia. At the NRC, she has directed several studies including Assessment of the U.S. Coast Guard Polar Icebreakers Roles and Future Needs, Exploration of Antarctic Subglacial Aquatic Environments: Environmental and Scientific Stewardship. She continues to work with the U.S. National Committee

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Appendix C 57 on the International Polar Year developing interagency communications and public outreach and education projects. Rob Greenway is a Senior Program Assistant at the National Academies Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate. He has worked on NRC studies that produced the reports Assessment of the Benefits of Extending the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission: A Perspective from the Research and Operations Communities, Review of NOAA’s Plan for the Scientific Stewardship Program, Where the Weather Meets the Road: A Research Agenda for Improving Road Weather Services, and Completing the Forecast: Characterizing and Communicating Uncertainty for Better Decisions Using Weather and Climate Forecasts, among others. He received his A.B. in English and his M.Ed. in English education from the University of Georgia.