Appendix B
Workshop Presenters’ Biosketches and Participant List

Dolores Acevedo-Garcia, Ph.D., MPA-URP, has a doctoral degree in public policy and demography (Princeton University, 1996). She is an associate professor in the Department of Society, Human Development and Health at the Harvard School of Public Health. Her research focuses on the effect of social determinants (e.g., residential segregation, immigrant adaptation) on health disparities along racial and ethnic lines; the role of nonhealth policies (e.g., housing policies, immigrant policies) in reducing those disparities; and the health and well-being of children with special needs and their families. Dr. Acevedo-Garcia is a member of the Social Science Advisory Board of the Poverty and Race Research Action Council. She is vice president of the Board of Directors of the Fair Housing Center of Greater Boston and chairs its Research Committee and she is a member of the Massachusetts Consortium for Children with Special Health Care Needs. Dr. Acevedo-Garcia is co-project director for DiversityData (http://diversitydata.sph.harvard.edu), an interactive website on socioeconomic indicators in U.S. metropolitan areas. DiversityData is an ongoing project of the Harvard School of Public Health and the Center for the Advancement of Health, supported by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, and the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, Health Policy Institute. She is also co-founder and faculty mentor for the Interdisciplinary Consortium on Urban Planning and Public Health, an organization of students who have joined together around common interests at the intersection of the fields of public health and urban planning and design. With funding from the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies at Harvard University, and the Kellogg Foundation, Dr. Acevedo-Garcia has led the creation of the Cross-national



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 115
Appendix B Workshop Presenters’ Biosketches and Participant List Dolores Acevedo-Garcia, Ph.D., MPA-URP, has a doctoral degree in public policy and demography (Princeton University, 1996). She is an associate professor in the Department of Society, Human Development and Health at the Harvard School of Public Health. Her research focuses on the effect of social determinants (e.g., residential segregation, immigrant adaptation) on health disparities along racial and ethnic lines; the role of nonhealth policies (e.g., housing policies, immigrant policies) in reducing those disparities; and the health and well-being of children with special needs and their families. Dr. Acevedo-Garcia is a member of the Social Science Advisory Board of the Poverty and Race Research Action Council. She is vice president of the Board of Directors of the Fair Housing Center of Greater Boston and chairs its Research Committee and she is a member of the Massachusetts Consortium for Children with Special Health Care Needs. Dr. Acevedo- Garcia is co-project director for DiversityData (http://diversitydata.sph. harvard.edu), an interactive website on socioeconomic indicators in U.S. metropolitan areas. DiversityData is an ongoing project of the Harvard School of Public Health and the Center for the Advancement of Health, supported by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, and the Joint Center for Politi- cal and Economic Studies, Health Policy Institute. She is also co-founder and faculty mentor for the Interdisciplinary Consortium on Urban Planning and Public Health, an organization of students who have joined together around common interests at the intersection of the fields of public health and urban planning and design. With funding from the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies at Harvard University, and the Kellogg Foundation, Dr. Acevedo-Garcia has led the creation of the Cross-national 

OCR for page 115
 CHALLENGES AND SUCCESSES IN REDUCING HEALTH DISPARITIES Initiative on Place, Migration and Health, a diverse research network com- mitted to understanding the links between migration processes and the health of (im)migrants, their families, and their sending and receiving com- munities using a cross-national lens for research and policy. Angela Glover Blackwell, J.D., is founder and chief executive officer of PolicyLink, a national research and action institute that works collabora- tively to develop and implement local, state, and federal policies to achieve economic and social equity. Previously, she was senior vice president at the Rockefeller Foundation. She also founded the Urban Strategies Council, a pioneering community-building organization in Oakland, California, and served as a partner with Public Advocates, a nationally known public inter- est law firm. She earned a bachelor’s degree from Howard University and a law degree from the University of California, Berkeley. Janis Campbell, Ph.D., is the surveillance coordinator for Chronic Disease at the Oklahoma State Department of Health. She has served in that position for 4 years. She has over 15 years experience with public health research and surveillance in Oklahoma. Dr. Campbell is the principal investigator for the Oklahoma Central Cancer Registry and the Oklahoma REACH 2010 Native American Project to Address Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes. Dr. Campbell received her Ph.D. in anthropology in 1997 from the University of Oklahoma. Dr. Campbell is an adjunct faculty member at the Oklahoma University College of Public Health. She has published and presented locally and nationally on many occasions on topics related to health care among Native Americans in Oklahoma. William (Bill) Dotson is chief of the Bureau of Family, School, and Commu- nity Health for the St. Louis Department of Health. He received his under- graduate degree from Webster University and graduate degrees in Clinical Psychology and Organizational Behavior from Washington University in St. Louis. He was also awarded an Honorary Ph.D. in Humanities from the University of Colorado for his HIV/AIDS work in minority communi- ties. Mr. Dotson is a founding appointee to the Minority Health Advisory Committee in the State of Missouri Department of Health, and a found- ing Mayoral appointee and co-chair to the Ryan White Planning Council for the City of St. Louis. With over 15 years of public health service as a manager and educator for the City of St. Louis Department of Health, Mr. Dotson has had responsibility for developing community collaborations, securing funding, and implementing initiatives designed to impact critical health disparities in the City of St. Louis. He is also a distinguished lecturer on minority health.

OCR for page 115
 APPENDIX B Katherine Gottlieb has an M.B.A. from Alaska Pacific University and has been President/CEO of the Southcentral Foundation since 1987. Under her leadership, Southcentral Foundation has grown from fewer than 100 employees to more than 1,200 and from an annual operating budget of about $3 million to one of $100 million. It provides more than 65 medical and behavioral health services programs. Ms. Gottlieb is of Aleut descent, and is a member of CIRI, which is 1 of 12 in-state Native regional corpora- tions established by Congress under the terms of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. Carol Horowitz, M.D., M.P.H., is an assistant professor in the Departments of Health Policy and Medicine at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City. As a primary care physician and health services researcher, her primary interest is in understanding and eliminating racial and ethnic dis- parities using community-based participatory research methods. Currently, she directs the East Harlem Diabetes Center of Excellence, a community- based coalition with a goal to better the lives of individuals with diabetes. She is also the principal investigator of a National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant, and of the Community Core of an NIH-funded center, both of which aim to improve chronic disease outcomes amongst residents of Harlem, New York City, through community-based research interventions. She received her B.S. and M.D. from Cornell University, trained in internal medicine and primary care at the Albert Einstein School of Medicine in the Bronx, and was a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar at the University of Washington in Seattle. Edward F. Lawlor, Ph.D., holds a B.A. in economics, government, and legal studies from Bowdoin College. He received his Ph.D. from the Florence Heller Graduate School for Advanced Studies in Social Welfare at Brandeis University. He is currently the dean and William E. Gordon Professor at the George Warren Brown School of Social Work at Washington University in St. Louis. Professor Lawlor has published widely on access to health care, health care reform, policy analysis, and aging. He is the author of Redesigning the Medicare Contract: Politics, Markets, and Agency and founding editor of the Public Policy and Aging Report. Mary McFadden received a B.A. in health science from State University of New York at Cortland in 1988, began a career in public health at the Broome County Public Health Department with the Women, Infants, and Children’s program as a public health representative in 1991, and was instrumental for developing and implementing the first WIC Breastfeeding Peer Counseling program in Broome County. In addition, she was instru- mental in the development and incorporation of the Southern Tier Breast-

OCR for page 115
 CHALLENGES AND SUCCESSES IN REDUCING HEALTH DISPARITIES feeding Coalition. In 1996 she was promoted to a public health educator for the Cancer Services program, and in 1998 promoted to supervising pub- lic health educator to implement and oversee an integrated chronic disease risk reduction program. In 2000, Ms. McFadden received the New York State Department of Health’s Partner of Distinction Award. In September 2003 to the present, she has overseen the Steps to a HealthierNY program in Broome County. Ms. McFadden has presented the successes of Broome County’s Steps program around the Country, including the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion and the Centers for Disease Control Annual National Preven- tion Summit. Lastly, and most importantly, she is the mother of two young boys who provide her with the ultimate challenge of her health education expertise. Christopher J. L. Murray, D.Phil., M.D., is the director of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington and Profes- sor of Global Health at the University of Washington School of Medicine. A physician and health economist, his early work focused on tuberculosis control and the development with Dr. Alan Lopez of the Global Burden of Disease methods and applications. In this work, they developed a new metric to compare death and disability from various diseases and the contribution of risk factors to the overall burden of disease in developing and developed countries. This pioneering effort has been hailed as a major landmark in public health and an important foundation for policy formu- lation and priority setting. He has also contributed to the development of a range of new methods and empirical studies to strengthen the basis for population health measurement and cost-effectiveness analysis. He worked at the World Health Organization from 1998 to 2003 where he served as the Executive Director of the Evidence and Information for Policy Cluster while Gro Harlem Brundtland was Director-General. Since 1998, a main thrust of his work has been on the conceptualization, measurement, and application of approaches to understand the inputs, organization, outputs, and outcomes of health systems. From 2003 until 2007, he was the direc- tor of the Harvard University Initiative for Global Health and the Richard Saltonstall Professor of Public Policy. Dr. Murray has authored or edited 14 books, many book chapters, and more than 120 journal articles in internationally peer-reviewed publications. He holds a B.A. from Harvard College, a D.Phil. from Oxford University, and an M.D. from Harvard Medical School. Lisa Pivec is the Director of Community Health Promotion for Cherokee Nation Health Services. She holds a master’s degree from Northeastern State University in college teaching with an emphasis in health. Ms. Pivec

OCR for page 115
 APPENDIX B has been with the Cherokee Nation since 1991 and currently works closely with the Oklahoma State Department of Health REACH 2010 project, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Steps to a HealthierUS and Tobacco Control Tribal Support Center projects, and she chairs the Cherokee Nation Community Health Services Committee. Ms. Pivec is a member of the Cherokee Nation and is originally from the Peavine commu- nity in Adair County. She hopes to continue working with and for Cherokee people throughout her career. Charmaine Ruddock, M.S., project director, Bronx Health REACH, the Institute for Urban Family Health, has been involved in the administration of health care services to medically underserved communities for more than 10 years, notably in the design, development, and operational oversight of Medicaid Managed Care Organizations serving communities in New York City, Long Island, and Connecticut. She has sat on the Board of Directors of the New York Prenatal Care Steering Committee and HHFII, organiza- tions dedicated to improving the health outcomes of New Yorkers. Ms. Ruddock joined the Institute for Urban Family Health in 2000 to direct Bronx Health REACH, a coalition of 40 community- and faith-based organizations, funded by the Centers for Disease Control REACH 2010 initiative. In addition to REACH, Ms. Ruddock also directs two other diabetes-focused initiatives—the Diabetes Prevention and Control Initiative funded by the New York State Department of Health Bureau of Chronic Diseases Services and an NIH-funded initiative exploring the use of faith- based organizations to provide diabetes education. Bronx Health REACH’s goal is the elimination of racial and ethnic disparities in health outcomes in the southwest Bronx. The health priority focus is diabetes and heart disease. Ms. Ruddock is working with several community groups, faith-based orga- nizations, and health care providers to implement several initiatives, namely the Primary Prevention and Public Health Education Program; Community Health Advocacy; Faith-Based Outreach efforts; a Legal and Regulatory workgroup; and the Grocer and Restaurant Outreach Program. Ms. Rud- dock holds a bachelor’s degree in literature and social sciences from the University of the West Indies and a masters of science in management and policy analysis from the Graduate School of Management, The New School for Social Research. Diane Schwartz is the president and CEO of the American Conference on Diversity. Ms. Schwartz manages the American Conference on Diversity’s community, program, public relations, and marketing functions throughout the State of New Jersey. She has over 25 years of experience in the field. Ms. Schwartz holds a B.A. and M.A. in English from Monmouth University and has done postgraduate work in marketing. A published author, her arti-

OCR for page 115
0 CHALLENGES AND SUCCESSES IN REDUCING HEALTH DISPARITIES cles on health care, management, and human relations issues have appeared in national and state publications. With over 25 years of experience in cre- ating and implementing organizational development programs for nonprofit groups in the state, she has revitalized and expanded community groups and organizations to maximize their potential. For years, Ms. Schwartz pro- duced and hosted Healthview, a half-hour television information program airing weekly on CTN of New Jersey. She has appeared on numerous televi- sion programs sharing information and expertise on human relations issues. She is an active participant in the community as a member of the NJN-New Jersey Public Television Diversity in Action Committee and as a member of the New Jersey Human Relations Council Advisory Board. Ms. Schwartz is also a member of the Monmouth County Human Relations Commis- sion and has served on the Long Range Planning Committee for the New Jersey Commission on Higher Education. She is a member of the Board of Directors of Leadership New Jersey and was a Fellow of Leadership New Jersey, Class of 2002. She is a member of the Executive Women of New Jersey. Prior to joining the American Conference on Diversity, Ms. Schwartz was Senior Vice President of Public Affairs for Raritan Bay Health Services Corporation, a two-hospital, multifaceted health care system in central New Jersey, and she also managed the Raritan Bay Healthcare Foundation. She has served variously as president of both the Perth Amboy and Old Bridge Chambers of Commerce; president of the Perth Amboy Rotary, where she was honored as a Paul Harris Fellow; and as a director of the Woodbridge Metro Chamber of Commerce. She is a past chair of the Business Coalition for Perth Amboy Youth, a coalition of business, education, and municipal representatives developing jobs for urban youth. She served as a director of Camp Kiddie Keep Well, a New Jersey camp for underprivileged children. She was a member of the Mayor’s Economic Development Committee for the City of Perth Amboy, and was on the Marketing Committee of the Old Bridge Economic Development Corporation. In 1992, the Perth Amboy Chamber of Commerce named her Executive of the Year. Ms. Schwartz is former vice president of the Hospital Fund Raising Executives of New Jersey, a past president of the New Jersey Hospital Public Relations and Marketing Association, and a featured speaker and consultant for various business, industry, and nonprofit organizations throughout the region. Ms. Schwartz is married and has four grown children. She and her husband live in Colts Neck, New Jersey. Donald M. Suggs, D.D.S., was born in East Chicago, Indiana, and attended the public schools there. He graduated with B.S. and D.D.S. degrees from Indiana University, then did his postgraduate work at Washington Univer- sity Dental School and Homer G. Phillips Hospital. He served as chief of oral surgery at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware and was the first African

OCR for page 115
 APPENDIX B American to serve as an associate clinical professor at St. Louis University Dental School. Dr. Suggs was a fellow of the American Association of Oral and Maxillo-Facial Surgeons and has a limited private practice in his specialty. Active in the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s and 1970s, he served as chairman of the Poor People’s March-on-Washington in 1968. Later, he became founder and chairman of the African Continuum, orga- nized to bring serious noncommercial African American artistic endeavors to St. Louis. He was a long-time president of the Alexander-Suggs Gallery of African Art based in St. Louis and New York City (1970–1989). He is a founding member of the Center for African Art (now the Museum of Afri- can Art in New York City) and is a former member of the board of direc- tors of the Studio Museum in New York. Dr. Suggs currently serves on the St. Louis Art Museum Board of Commissioners. He was the first African American to serve as president of the Convention and Visitors Bureau of St. Louis. His business activities also include president of Arch Concessions and a partner with D & D Concessions and the City Plaza Project. Dr. Suggs has been awarded honorary doctorate degrees from the University of Missouri- St. Louis, Harris-Stowe State University, and St. Louis University and is the recipient of many civic awards. He is currently president and publisher of the St. Louis American Newspaper, Missouri’s largest black newspaper. He is the father of Donald M. Jr., Dawn Marie, and Dina Margaret. Captain Nancy Williams has been working in public health for over 30 years. She has been with the U.S. Public Health Service for 23 years, working in the Indian Health Service and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). She received her MSPH from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. She has worked as the first Tribal Health Educa- tor for the Hopi Tribe, with the Arizona Department of Health, and the San Bernardino County Health Department. While in the Indian Health Service, she worked in the Albuquerque, Phoenix, and Nashville areas. She spent 2 years detailed to the Department of the Interior working with the Common- wealth of the Northern Marianas Islands. While at CDC, she worked with the Office on Smoking and Health, and the Steps to a HealthierUS Program Office, where she is presently the acting lead for the Program Team.

OCR for page 115
 CHALLENGES AND SUCCESSES IN REDUCING HEALTH DISPARITIES PARTICIPANT LIST Gloria Brand Dara Autumn OWH Department of Health and Missouri Foundation for Health Human Services St. Louis, MO Jefferson City, MO RADM John Babb Marilyn Brown Department of Health and Human St. Louis University Services School of Public Health Kansas City, MO St. Louis, MO Ryan Barker Moira Cahan Missouri Foundation for Health Missouri Foundation for Health St. Louis, MO St. Louis, MO Caroline Battles Aurita Caldwell Missouri Foundation for Health Department of Health and Human St. Louis, MO Services St. Louis, MO CAPT Jose Belardo Department of Health and Human James Campbell Services Oklahoma State Department of Kansas City, MO Health Oklahoma City, OK Judy Bentley Community Health-In-Partnership Maria E. Cepeda, MHA Services (CHIPS) Office of Minority Health St. Louis, MO Department of Health and Senior Services Rudy Bess Jefferson City, MO Hope Light Foundation Hazelwood, MO Catrina Chambers, MSPH St. Louis University Sarah Betsworth St. Louis, MO St. Louis University School of Public Health Siobhan Champ-Blackwell, MSLIS St. Louis, MO National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Midcontinental Angela Bowman, MSW, PLCSW Region Bi-Lingual International Assistant Creighton University Health Services Omaha, NE St. Louis, MO

OCR for page 115
 APPENDIX B Debbie Chase Kate Eddens Clayton, MO St. Louis University School of Public Health Leann Chilton St. Louis, MO Barnes-Jewish Healthcare Bert Emmons St. Louis, MO Sober Living-Midwest Arthur Colbert St. Louis, MO Missouri Foundation for Health Jannis Evans St. Louis, MO Office of Minority Health LaVonda Cotton Jefferson City, MO Williams & Associates, Inc. Angela Fleming, MPH St. Louis, MO Interfaith Partnership of Ana-Paula Cupertino, PhD Metropolitan University of Kansas Medical St. Louis/Faith Beyond Walls Center St. Louis, MO Kansas City, KS Ben Francisco, PhD, PNP, AE-C L. Dauernheim University of Missouri, Columbia St. Louis, MO Vannessa Frazier Jesse DeLeon Howardville Community Southeast Missouri Health Betterment Network Howardville, MO Kennett, MO Alicia Galan Mary Deverman Department of Health and Human Cenlene Foundation for Quality Services, Office for Civil Healthcare Rights, Region VII Clayton, MO Kansas City, MO Margaret Donnelly CAPT Edwin Galan State Representative Department of Health and Human St. Louis, MO Services Kansas City, MO Monica Dykas Toni Garrison, MHA Interfaith Partnership St. Louis, MO Passport Health—The Vaccine People St. Louis, MO

OCR for page 115
 CHALLENGES AND SUCCESSES IN REDUCING HEALTH DISPARITIES Elizabeth George Mary E. Homan, MA Deacon Foundation St. Louis University St. Louis, MO School of Public Health St. Louis, MO Hannah Gilk Ellen Horan Institute of Family Medicine St. Louis, MO Catholic Health Association St. Louis, MO James E. Green William Hudson Williams & Associates, Inc. St. Louis, MO Freelance Writer St. Louis, MO Deidre Griffith Betty Kao St. Louis University School of Public Health St. Louis Christian Chinese St. Louis, MO Community Service Center St Louis, MO Rosalind Guy Rosetta Keeton St. Louis, MO St. Louis ConnectCare Community Sandi Leland Hawk Health Centers St. Louis Maternal, Child and St. Louis, MO Family Health Coalition Pamela Kelly, MBA St. Louis, MO Missouri Telehealth Network Cynthia Hayes St. Louis, MO Missouri Foundation for Health Yit Mui Khoo St. Louis, MO St. Louis Christian Chinese Kym Hemley Community Service Center SOCF St Louis, MO Cleveland, OH Karley M. King Rich Hennicke Chesterfield, MO Nurses for Newborns Foundation Hope Krebill St. Louis, MO National Cancer Institute’s Cancer Warren Holloman, Jr. Information Service Williams & Associates, Inc. Kansas City, KS St. Louis, MO

OCR for page 115
 APPENDIX B Christy Lapka E. Rachel Mutrux St. Louis University Missouri Telehealth Network School of Public Health Unversity of Missouri School of St. Louis, MO Medicine Columbia, MO Johnnie Miller Matlock Marcia Newton St. Louis, MO St. Louis City Health Department Joe McCarthy St. Louis, MO Missouri Foundation for Health Warren Nichols St. Louis, MO St. Louis Department of Health Martin McCrary St. Louis, MO St. Louis, MO Akihiko Noudin Joan McGivney St. Louis University St. Louis, MO St. Louis, MO Joris Miller Sandy Ortia Community Alternatives Southeast Missouri University St. Louis, MO Cape Girardeau, MO Margie Minor Bev Pfeifer-Harms OMH—Department of Health and Missouri Foundation for Health Human Services St. Louis, MO St. Louis, MO David Pfieffer Carolyn Montgomery St. Louis University Southeast Missouri Health School of Public Health Network St. Louis, MO Portageville, MO Debbie Pfeiffer, MA Bobbi Morris St. Louis University Southeast Missouri University School of Public Health Cape Girardeau, MO St. Louis, MO Ibrahim A. Muhammad Nancy Phillips, MSW, LCSW Muhammad Blamic Academy Midtown Catholic Charities St. Louis, MO Community Services St. Louis, MO Saffiyah Muhammad Hazelwood, MO

OCR for page 115
 CHALLENGES AND SUCCESSES IN REDUCING HEALTH DISPARITIES Salim Phillips Deena Scott Williams & Associates, Inc. Missouri Foundation for Health St. Louis, MO St. Louis, MO Terry Plain Donna Shoff Missouri Foundation for Health Missouri Foundation for Health St. Louis, MO St. Louis, MO Cynthia L. Price Linda Spinn Southern Illinois Healthcare Nurses for Newborns Foundation Foundation St. Louis, MO St. Louis, MO Jill Thompson Evelyn Pullian Maternal Child & Family Health Southeast Missouri Health Coalition Network St. Louis, MO Kennett, MO Vetta L. Thompson Gwen Ratermann St. Louis University Center for Health Policy St. Louis, MO University of Missouri Donna Vent Columbia, MO Southeast Missouri Health Leslie Reed Network Missouri Foundation for Health New Madrid, MO St. Louis, MO Eduardo J. Vera Evelyn Reid Language Access Metro Project Webster University (LAMP) an Agency of Catholic St. Louis, MO Family Services St. Louis, MO Karen Roth Heather Weeden St. Louis Business Health Coalition St. Louis, MO St. Louis, MO Mitch Schneider Consuelo Hopkins Wilkins, MD West End Word Washington University School of St Louis, MO Medicine St. Louis, MO Lisa Schwarb Erise Williams University of Missouri Columbia, MO Williams & Associates, Inc. St. Louis, MO

OCR for page 115
 APPENDIX B Paula E. Wills Jennifer Wood Health Visions of East St. Louis Missouri Foundation for Health East St. Louis, IL St. Louis, MO

OCR for page 115