B
Biographies of Committee Members

Arup K. Chakraborty (Chair) is the Robert T. Haslam Professor of Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, and Biological Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He obtained his Ph.D. in chemical engineering at the University of Delaware. After postdoctoral studies at the University of Minnesota, he joined the faculty at the University of California at Berkeley in December 1988. He rose through the ranks and ultimately served as the Warren and Katherine Schlinger Distinguished Professor and Chair of Chemical Engineering, professor of chemistry, and professor of biophysics at Berkeley. He was also head of theoretical and computational biology at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. In September of 2005, Dr. Chakraborty moved to MIT. The central theme of his research today is the development and application of statistical mechanical approaches to study how T lymphocytes, orchestrators of the adaptive immune response, function. A characteristic of his work is that it directly impacts experimental immunology, and he collaborates extensively with immunologists. Dr. Chakraborty’s work has been recognized by many honors that include the Allan P. Colburn and Professional Progress awards of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, a Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar award, a Miller Research Professorship, a National Young Investigator award, an NIH Director’s Pioneer Award, and the E.O. Lawrence Memorial Award for Life Sciences. Dr. Chakraborty is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.


Joanna Aizenberg is the Gordon McKay Professor of Materials Science in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and the Susan S. and Kenneth L.



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B Biographies of Committee Members Arup K. Chakraborty (Chair) is the Robert T. Haslam Professor of Chemical Engi- neering, Chemistry, and Biological Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He obtained his Ph.D. in chemical engineering at the University of Delaware. After postdoctoral studies at the University of Minnesota, he joined the faculty at the University of California at Berkeley in December 1988. He rose through the ranks and ultimately served as the Warren and Katherine Schlinger Distinguished Professor and Chair of Chemical Engineering, professor of chem- istry, and professor of biophysics at Berkeley. He was also head of theoretical and computational biology at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. In September of 2005, Dr. Chakraborty moved to MIT. The central theme of his research today is the development and application of statistical mechanical approaches to study how T lymphocytes, orchestrators of the adaptive immune response, function. A characteristic of his work is that it directly impacts experimental immunology, and he collaborates extensively with immunologists. Dr. Chakraborty’s work has been recognized by many honors that include the Allan P. Colburn and Professional Progress awards of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, a Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar award, a Miller Research Professorship, a National Young Investi- gator award, an NIH Director’s Pioneer Award, and the E.O. Lawrence Memorial Award for Life Sciences. Dr. Chakraborty is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Joanna Aizenberg is the Gordon McKay Professor of Materials Science in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and the Susan S. and Kenneth L. 0

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aPPendix b  Wallach Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, both at Harvard University. She was previously a member of technical staff at Bell Laboratories/ Lucent Technologies. She received her B.S. and M.S. in chemistry from Moscow State University and a Ph.D. in structural biology from the Weizmann Institute of Science. Her research interests are in biomaterials and biomimetics. Dr. Aizenberg’s select honors include the Ronald Breslow Award for Achievement in Biomimetic Chemistry from the American Chemical Society (ACS); Industrial Innovation Award, ACS; New Investigator Award in Chemistry and Biology of Mineralized Tissues; Arthur K. Doolittle Award of the ACS; Award of the Max-Planck Society in the field of Biology and Materials Science. Dr. Aizenberg is a member of the Board of Directors of the Materials Research Society. She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Annelise E. Barron is associate professor of bioengineering at Stanford University. She received her B.S. from the University of Washington, Seattle, and her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, both in chemical engineering. She was an NIH-NRSA postdoctoral research fellow at the University of California, San Francisco. Her research program involves the development of protein and peptide mimics based on biostable foldamers as well as novel materials for genetic analysis on microfluidic devices. She is a member of the advisory committee to the director of the NIH and serves on the NIH Synthetic and Biological Chemistry B study sec- tion. Dr. Barron’s honors include the DuPont Young Professor Award, the Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, and the Beckman Young Investigator Award. Ken A. Dill is professor of pharmaceutical chemistry and biophysics and associate dean of research for the School of Pharmacy at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Dill earned S.B. and S.M. degrees in mechanical engineering from MIT, a Ph.D. in biology from the University of California, San Diego, and was a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University. His research group uses computational biology and statistical mechanical modeling to explore proteins, their physical properties, and their folding processes, in addition to the structure and properties of water. Dr. Dill has served as president and councilor of the Biophysical Society, councilor of the Protein Society, and as a member of the Executive Committee of the American Physical Society (APS). He currently chairs the Public Affairs Com- mittee of the Biophysical Society. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the APS, the Institute of Physics, and the Biophysical Society, and serves on the editorial and advisory boards for Physical Biology, Protein Science, Protein Engineering, Biopolymers, Multiscale Modeling and Simu- lation, and Structure. Dr. Dill is the founder and codirector of the Bridging the Sciences Coalition, which brings together 16 basic research societies representing

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insPired biology  by 280,000 scientists to support innovation at the interface between the life sciences and the physical sciences. Sharon C. glotzer is professor of chemical engineering, materials science and engi- neering, and physics at the University of Michigan. She also holds the titles Professor of Applied Physics and Professor of Macromolecular Science and Engineering and is a faculty affiliate in the University of Michigan’s Center for Theoretical Physics, Center for the Study of Complex Systems, Center for Computational Medicine and Biology, and the Michigan Nanotechnology Institute for Medicine and Biological Sciences, where she serves on the executive board. She received her B.S. in physics from UCLA and her Ph.D. in physics from Boston University. Dr. Glotzer is a computational scientist specializing in soft matter and nanomaterials theory, with a special focus on self-assemby and phase transformations in liquids, glasses and jammed materials, nanoparticles and colloids, liquid crystals, polymers and other complex fluids. Dr. Glotzer received the APS’s Maria Goeppert-Mayer Award, the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), and the Department of Commerce Bronze Medal and was a Sigma Xi lecturer. Dr. Glotzer served as chair of the APS Forum on Industrial and Applied Physics and chair of the American Institute of Chemical Engineering’s Nanoscale Science and Engineering Forum. She is a fellow of the APS. Yale E. goldman is professor of physiology and director of the Pennsylvania Muscle Institute at the University of Pennsylvania. He received his B.S. from Northwestern University (1969) and M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Pennsylvania (1975). Dr. Goldman’s research interests are understanding the mechanism of molecular motors and protein synthesis by the ribosome; mechanochemistry; and structural dynamics. His research group uses novel biophysical techniques, including laser photolysis of caged molecules, bifunctional fluorescent probes, single-molecule fluorescence polarization, and optical traps to map the real-time domain motions of proteins. Dr. Goldman is former president of the Biophysical Society. His honors include the Upjohn Achievement Award from the University of Pennsylvania; a research fellowship from the Muscular Dystrophy Association; the National Research Service Award the Research Career Development Award, and the MERIT Award (all three from NIH); the Bowditch Lecturer of the American Physiological Society; the Lindback Foundation Award for Distinguished Teaching; and the Lamport Lecturer of the University of Washington School of Medicine. Elias greenbaum is a corporate fellow and group leader at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and an adjunct professor in the University of Tennessee’s Genome Science and Technology program. He received his B.S. degree in physics from Brooklyn College and Ph.D. in experimental nuclear physics from Columbia Uni-

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aPPendix b  versity. Dr. Greenbaum’s main area of research is in the fields of photosynthesis and materials science and their applications to artificial sight, nanoscale science and technology, biosensor development, and renewable hydrogen production. Oak Ridge National Laboratory named him Scientist of the Year in 2000. He received the Department of Energy’s Biological and Chemical Technologies Research Pro- gram Award in 1995 and several UT-Battelle, LLC, and Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation awards. He co-founded DOE’s artificial sight program. Dr. Greenbaum led the team whose AquaSentinel Real-Time Water Supply Pro- tection Monitoring Biosensor System won the Federal Laboratory Consortium Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer (2005). He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He served as a member of the publications committees of the Biophysical Society and the American Institute of Physics and is currently editor in chief of the book series Biological and Medical Physics/Biomedical Engineering, published by Springer. Dr. Greenbaum was a Watkins Visiting Professor at Wichita State University, where he presented a series of lectures on photosynthesis, biotechnology, and renewable energy production. W. John Kao is professor of biomedical engineering and pharmaceutical sciences at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. He received a B.S.E. in biomedical engi- neering from Johns Hopkins University and an M.S.E. in biomedical engineering and a Ph.D. in macromolecular science from Case Western Reserve University. He was a postdoctoral research associate in the Institute of Biomedical Engineering at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, Switzerland, and in the Divi- sion of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering at the California Institute of Tech- nology. Dr. Kao’s research focuses on the role of biomaterials in the management of various pathological conditions. Specifically, he is elucidating the mechanisms of cell adhesion and activation on biomaterials, delineating the critical factors in material biocompatibility and biodegradation, and developing enabling technology for the synthesis of novel materials for tissue engineering. He is chair of the Society for Biomaterials’ Education and Professional Development Student Affairs Task Force. David Needham is professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at Duke University. He also holds appointments as associate professor of biomedical engineering; associate professor, Center for Cellular and Biosurface Engineering; and associate professor, Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center. He received a B.S. in applied chemistry from Trent Polytechnic and a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of Nottingham. Dr. Needham’s research interests are the mate- rial properties of lipid monolayers, bilayer membranes, hydrogels, wax particles, emulsions, gas bubbles, and cells; and adhesion and repulsion involving molecular

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insPired biology  by structures at interfaces including water-soluble polymers and receptor-mediated cell adhesion. His honors include the F. I. R. S. T. Award from the National Institutes of Health, the Alfred M. Hunt Faculty Scholarship, the NATO/SERC (England) Fellowship, and the Oppenheimer Research Fellowship. v. Adrian Parsegian is chief of the Laboratory of Physical and Structural Biology at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. He received an A.B. in physics from Dartmouth College and a Ph.D. in biophysics from Harvard University. His research has provided fundamental contributions to the study of intermolecular forces in biological systems through measuring, formulating, com- puting, and gauging the consequences of forces that organize biomolecules. His work has included the theory and measurement of intermolecular forces, ion trans- port across cell membranes, protein conformation, colloids, aqueous interfaces, liquid crystals of lipids, protein, and nucleic acids. He is a fellow of the Biophysical Society and its former president, and he received the Society’s Distinguished Service Award in 1995. He is also the recipient of the NIH Director’s Award, which is NIH’s highest award. He has just published a book, Van der Waals Forces: A Handbook for Biologists, Chemists, Engineers, and Physicists, the first of an intended series of texts to make the physics of intermolecular forces accessible to those without a background in advanced physics. Alan Rudolph is president and CEO of Adlyfe, Inc. Dr. Rudolph has led R&D programs in biological self-assembly for over 20 years. He is currently spearhead- ing an effort to develop novel technologies in the private sector as an active CEO of a small biotechnology start-up, and nurture emerging technologies through his consulting practice and board positions on foundations. Prior to this assignment, Dr. Rudolph was chief of biological sciences for the Defense Sciences Office at DARPA, where he managed a $40 million life sciences portfolio in academia and industry, focusing on early risk reduction in the context of prototype development and technology transfer. His position at DARPA was to invest and manage high- risk, high-payoff multidisciplinary R&D projects in biotechnology. These programs included the design and fabrication of useful interfaces for biological molecules, cells, and tissues for working devices (e.g., diagnostics, sensors, prosthetics). He has also explored the development of wireless devices with biological systems in order to better understand and develop emerging technologies. Dr. Rudolph is the author of 100 technical publications, including seminal work in Nature and at the National Academy of Sciences and holds 15 patents, of which 2 are licensed for commercial development (drug delivery and medical imaging). He received his B.S. with highest honors in biology from the University of Michigan, a Ph.D. in cell biology from the University of California, and an M.B.A from the George Washington University.

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aPPendix b  Cyrus R. Safinya is a professor in the Department of Physics and the Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology at the University of California at Santa Barbara and in the Department of Materials in the University’s School of Engineering. He received a B.S. in physics and mathematics from Bates College and a Ph.D. in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Before joining the faculty of the University of California at Santa Barbara, he was a member of the technical staff at Exxon Research and Engineering Company in New Jersey and conducted research on the structure of complex fluids and biological membranes. Currently, his group’s research is focused on elucidating structures and interactions of supramolecular assemblies of biological molecules. This includes the elucida- tion of key parameters that control the interactions between proteins derived from the eukaryotic nerve cell cytoskeleton and lead to hierarchical structures, with the ultimate goal of relating structure to function; understanding DNA interactions with oppositely charged biomolecules in the context of DNA packing; and devel- oping synthetic carriers of genes and short-interfering RNA for gene delivery and silencing applications. He was a Henri De Rothschild Foundation Fellow, awarded by the Curie Institute, in 1994. He is a fellow of the APS and the American Associa- tion for the Advancement of Science. Charles F. Stevens is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and the Vincent J. Coates Professor of Molecular Neurobiology at the Salk Institute for Bio- logical Studies in LaJolla, California. Previously, he was professor and chair of the Molecular Neurobiology Section at Yale University School of Medicine. Dr. Stevens’s research centers on mechanisms responsible for synaptic transmission in the central nervous system, using a combination of molecular biological, electrophysiological, anatomical, and theoretical methods. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Stevens has chaired and served on a number of NRC committees. In addition to his publications in the field of neurobiology, he authored the book The Six Core Theories of Modern Physics, which summarizes the basic theoretical structures of classical mechanics, electricity and magnetism, quantum mechanics, statistical physics, special relativity, and quantum field theory. Dr. Stevens serves as an advisor to a telecommunications firm on the possible health effects of cell phone use. He received his M.D. from Yale University School of Medicine and his Ph.D. from Rockefeller University. David A. Weitz is the Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and of Applied Physics at Harvard University. He received a B.S. in physics from the University of Waterloo and an A.M. and a Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University. Dr. Weitz’s research group studies the physics of soft condensed matter. Before coming to Harvard, Dr. Weitz was a professor of physics at the University of Pennsylvania and a physi- cist with Exxon Research and Engineering Co.