Appendix C
Biographical Sketches of Presenters and Facilitators

Richard C. Atkinson served from 1995-2003 as the seventeenth president of the University of California system. His eight-year tenure was marked by innovative approaches to admissions and outreach, research initiatives to accelerate the University’s contributions to the state’s economy, and a challenge to the country’s most widely used admissions examination—the SAT 1—that paved the way to major changes in the way millions of America’s youth are now tested for college admissions. Before becoming president of the UC System, he served for fifteen years as chancellor of UC San Diego where he led that campus’s emergence as one of the leading research universities in the nation. He is a former director of the National Science Foundation, past president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and was a long-term member of the faculty at Stanford University. His research in the field of cognitive science and psychology has been concerned with problems of memory and cognition. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, the National Academy of Education, the American Philosophical Society, and a mountain in Antarctica has been named in his honor.


Holly Harris Bane has been the associate vice president for strategic initiatives and engagement at the University of Akron, Ohio, since 2006. In this recently created position, she is responsible for aligning and leveraging the university’s expertise in education, workforce training, and resource development to initiate new opportunities for strategic engagement that benefit the region, the state, and the university. She developed



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Appendix C Biographical Sketches of Presenters and Facilitators Richard C. Atkinson served from 1995-2003 as the seventeenth president of the University of California system. His eight-year tenure was marked by innovative approaches to admissions and outreach, research initiatives to accelerate the University’s contributions to the state’s economy, and a challenge to the country’s most widely used admissions examination— the SAT 1—that paved the way to major changes in the way millions of America’s youth are now tested for college admissions. Before becoming president of the UC System, he served for fifteen years as chancellor of UC San Diego where he led that campus’s emergence as one of the leading research universities in the nation. He is a former director of the National Science Foundation, past president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and was a long-term member of the faculty at Stanford University. His research in the field of cognitive science and psychology has been concerned with problems of memory and cognition. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, the National Academy of Education, the American Philosophi- cal Society, and a mountain in Antarctica has been named in his honor. Holly Harris Bane has been the associate vice president for strategic initiatives and engagement at the University of Akron, Ohio, since 2006. In this recently created position, she is responsible for aligning and lever- aging the university’s expertise in education, workforce training, and resource development to initiate new opportunities for strategic engage- ment that benefit the region, the state, and the university. She developed 

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0 APPENDIX C and now leads a university-wide Engagement Council comprised of a cross section of colleges and administrative units. She provides leadership for programs of educational outreach that are based on market research, workforce development trends and state and federal priorities. She has directed the development, construction, educational partnerships, and operation plan for the Medina County University Center—a $9 million, 33,000 square foot workforce development and innovation degree facility for secondary students and incumbent workers. Prior to assuming this post she served as director of strategic initiatives for the University of Akron from 2001-2006, where she was responsible for seeking opportu- nities for external engagement that align with the university’s academic programs. From 1999-2001, Ms. Harris Bane served in the Office of the Gover- nor and the Ohio Department of Education, where she was responsible for the launch and implementation of Governor Taft’s chief educational initiative to award $50 million in grants and recruit 20,000 volunteers to serve as reading tutors. She also created partnerships and collaborative opportunities to support the OhioReads initiative. Other responsibilities at the University of Akron have included the position of assistant director of the Ray C. Bliss Institute of Applied Politics (1989-1999). She received an M.A. from the University of Akron in political science, an M.A. in admin- istration in higher education from Ohio State University, and has pursued Ph.D. work in Russian history from the University of Akron. Thomas Bowles was appointed as science advisor for New Mexico Gover- nor Bill Richardson in July 2006. As the science advisor, Bowles is respon- sible for providing advice to the governor on science and technology (S&T) issues, integrating S&T activities across New Mexico, and working with the national laboratories, universities, and industry in New Mexico to advance collaborations and couple advances in S&T into the public sector. Prior to his appointment as science advisor, Bowles served for two years as the chief science officer of Los Alamos National Laboratory. In that role, he was responsible for oversight of the full range of science carried out at the laboratory. Those responsibilities included serving as a member of the senior executive board, having oversight for more than $100M a year in discretionary research funds, having oversight over all external scientific reviews and strategic science planning, serving as the laboratory’s principal contact with universities and other institutions, and ensuring the vitality of the scientific staff. Bowles came to Los Alamos in 1979 to establish an effort in weak interaction physics that has gone on to be recognized as one of the leading efforts in the world. He has been a key player in several international neutrino experiments and the principal investigator on a fundamental symmetries program. During his time at

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 APPENDIX C the laboratory, Bowles has served in a variety of positions and received a number of awards, including the M.A. Markov Prize that was awarded by the Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences for his work as a principal investigator of the Soviet-American Gallium Experiment, a major solar neutrino investigation. In addition to being both a Laboratory fellow and a fellow of the American Physical Society, Bowles is an affiliate professor at the University of Washington. He has served on numerous laboratory and national committees, advisory panels, and editorial boards, including the Department of Energy and National Sci- ence Foundation’s Nuclear Science Advisory Committee. Bowles earned his bachelor’s degree in physics and mathematics from the University of Colorado and his doctoral degree in physics from Princeton University. Jay Cole has served as the education policy advisor to West Virginia Governor Joe Manchin since January 2005. In this capacity, he advises the governor on both preK-12 and postsecondary education policy. From 2001 to 2005, he served as the deputy secretary of education and the arts and senior policy advisor in the administration of Governor Bob Wise. He is completing his Ph.D. in higher education and public policy at the University of Michigan, where his dissertation is a study of the diffusion of science and technology policy innovations across states. He holds an M.A. in educational policy and leadership from Ohio State University and a B.A. with honors in political science and history from West Virginia University. Jay is a 1993 Truman scholar, a 1995-1996 foreign language and area studies fellow, a Spencer Foundation fellow from 1996-2000, an inter- national leader delegate to the European Union Visitors Program in 2005, and a 2007 Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the National Academies. He is coauthor of a 2002 RAND monograph on higher education philanthropy and served as assistant editor of the Asso- ciation for the Study of Higher Education’s 00 Reader on Higher Education Finance. His professional interests include higher education policy, state innovation, research, and economic development policies, international and comparative education, and the history of American education. He is a member of the steering and nominating committees of the Education Commission of the States and a member of the Southern Regional Educa- tion Board. Marla Cone is one of the nation’s premier environmental journalists. Cone has more than 20 years of experience covering environmental issues at the Los Angeles Times and other newspapers. She is author of the book, Silent Snow: The Slow Poisoning of the Arctic, published in 2005, which was a finalist in the National Academies’ 2006 Communication Award. She has twice won a national award for environmental reporting. Her reporting at

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 APPENDIX C the Times focuses on environmental health issues. Cone earned a bachelor of arts in journalism and political science at the University of Wisconsin, Whitewater. Edward G. Derrick directs the American Association for the Advance- ment of Science Research Competitiveness Program, which provides review, evaluation and guidance to the science and engineering commu- nity on the development of quality research programs. He has worked for the science and policy programs at AAAS since 1998, when he joined as a program associate. Derrick holds a Ph.D. from the University of Texas, Austin, with a dissertation in theoretical particle physics, and the science bachelor from MIT, with a thesis in biophysics. His academic experience includes two years at Humboldt University in Berlin as an Alexander von Humboldt fellow and his work experience includes one and a half years as a nuclear design engineer for Ontario Hydro. Ed’s publications include papers in refereed scientific journals, conference proceedings, project reports, software documentation and newspaper articles. Lynn Edward Elfner is chief executive officer of The Ohio Academy of Science, Columbus, where he also serves as acting editor of The Ohio Journal of Science. Previously he was with the Mt. Orab Local School District (science teacher), Ohio State University (instructor), the Ohio Environmental Council (executive director), and the Office of Budget and Management of State of Ohio. In January 1999 he was elected to the Board of Directors of the Washington, DC-based Triangle Coalition for Science and Technology Education. He is a former member of the Board of Directors, Ohio Scientific Education and Research Association. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science; he has received the Ohioana Book Award, Ohioana Library Association, 1980, Distinguished Service Award, National Association of Academies of Science, 1981, Distinguished Alumni Award, College of Agriculture, 1984, Honorary 100 from Ohio in Natural Resources, 1987, Centennial honoree, Herbarium, 1992, OSU, and Friend of Science Award, Science Education Council of Ohio, 1998; President’s Award , the Ohio Alliance for the Environment, 2003. Current activities: ex officio member, Board of Trustees, the Ohio Academy of Science; ex officio member, Board of Trustees, The Ohio Historical Society; Board of Directors, archivist, and Academy representative, National Association of Academies of Science; past Chair, Central Ohio Technology Day Awards Committee; member of both the State Science Education Standards Advisory Committee and the Technology Education Standards Advisory Committee of the Ohio Department of Education; a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science since 1969; a member of the National Science

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 APPENDIX C Teachers Association; a member of the Ohio Historical Society, and a former member of the Ohio Society of Association Executives. In October 2003 he received the President’s Award from the Ohio Alliance for the Environment. In November 2004 he received the President’s Award from the Ohio School Boards Association. He received a B.S. in zoology and an M.S. in plant ecology from Ohio State University. Kenneth R. Fulton is the executive director of the National Academy of Sciences. Following service in the U.S. Navy, where he was trained as a linguist, he joined the staff of the Academy in 1971. He served as admin- istrative officer for the Office of Scientific Personnel, and then as program officer in the Food and Nutrition Board, coordinating several studies of the use and consumption of food additives for the Food and Drug Admin- istration. In this capacity, he served for three years on the U.S. delegation to the Codex Alimentarius Commission of the United Nations. In 1980, he was appointed to the Academy’s executive office, first as director of membership, then as special assistant to the president and executive director. Mr. Fulton’s responsibilities include the Academy’s member- ship and program activities, including the election of members and their annual and regional meetings; the offices of the Academy president and vice president and its governing Council; the National Academies Keck Futures Initiative; the Arthur M. Sackler colloquia and Frontiers of Science symposia; the Koshland Science Museum; and the Office of Exhibitions and Cultural Programs, which brings art exhibits and concerts to the Washing- ton community. He is also the publisher of the Proceedings (PNAS), the Academy’s journal of original research, and executive director of The National Academies Corporation, which owns the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering. He is a member of the American Society of Association Executives and the American Association for the Advance- ment of Science, and served on the Committee on Dissemination of Sci- entific Information of the International Council for Science. Mr. Fulton holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Maryland in the social and behavioral sciences, and a master’s degree from American University in management. Susan Hackwood is currently executive director of the California Council on Science and Technology (CCST), and professor of electrical engineer- ing at the University of California, Riverside. CCST is a not-for-profit corporation comprised of 150 science and technology leaders sponsored by the key academic and federal research institutions in California, which advises the state on all aspects of science and technology including stem cell research, intellectual property, climate change, energy, information

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4 APPENDIX C technology, biotechnology, and education. Dr. Hackwood received a Ph.D. in solid state ionics from DeMontfort University, UK. Before joining aca- demia, she was department head of device robotics technology research at AT&T Bell Labs. In 1984 she joined the University of California, Santa Bar- bara as professor of electrical and computer engineering and was founder and director of the National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center for Robotic Systems in Microelectronics. In 1990, Dr. Hackwood became the founding dean of the Bourns College of Engineering at the University of California, Riverside (UCR). At UCR, she oversaw the development of all research and teaching aspects of five degree programs to the Ph.D. level. Dr. Hackwood’s current research interests include sci- ence and technology policy, distributed asynchronous signal processing, and cellular robot systems. Dr. Hackwood has published over 140 techni- cal publications and holds seven patents. She is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. (IEEE) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and holds honorary degrees from Worcester Polytechnic Institute and DeMontfort University, UK. From 2003-2005 she was a visiting scholar at the Anderson School of Management, University of California, Los Angeles. In fall 2005 she was a visiting scholar at the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Hackwood has worked extensively with industry, academic and government partner- ships to identify policy issues of importance to the country’s citizens. She is also an active participant in regional and state economic development. With a strong interest in science and technology policy, Dr. Hackwood is currently involved with science and technology development in Califor- nia, the United States, Mexico, Ireland, Taiwan and Costa Rica. She has been appointed as an honorary member of the Comision Asesora en Alta Tecnologia for Costa Rica and the California-Mexico Commission on Edu- cation, Science and Technology. In 2003 she was appointed a member of the AAAS Committee on Science Engineering and Public Policy and is the 2007 chair. From 2000-2002 she was a member of the AAAS Engineering Delegate and is currently chair of the Section on Societal Impacts of Sci- ence and Engineering. She is a member of the IEEE Spectrum Editorial Board. She has also served on the Board of Directors and consults on new product development for several electronics companies. Bill Hammack is a professor of chemical and biomolecular engineer- ing at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He served a year as a diplomat at the U.S. Department of State (2005-2006) working as a senior science advisor for the Office of Korea Affairs and the Bureau of International Security and Non-Proliferation. He is the only engineering professor tenured for reaching out directly to the public. Since 1999 Bill has created over 300 pieces for public radio. He is a regular commenta-

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 APPENDIX C tor on Marketplace, public radio premier business program, and was, for several years, the “resident engineer” on Radio National Australia’s Sci- ence Show. For this work, he has been recognized by many journalistic, science and engineering societies. He has won the National Association of Science Writers’ Science-in-Society Award, the American Institute of Phys- ics Science Writing Award, the American Chemical Society’s Grady-Stack Medal, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers’ Church Medal, the IEEE Award for Distinguished Literary Contributions Furthering the Public Understanding of Engineering, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers’ Service to Society Award, the American Society of Engineering Education’s President Award, and the National Federation of Community Broadcasters’ Silver Reel for National News and Commentary. William C. Harris is president and CEO of Science Foundation Arizona. Dr. Harris went to Ireland as director general of Science Foundation Ire- land (SFI) in 2001 and moved to Arizona in July 2006. Dr. Harris served at the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) from 1978 to 1996, including as the director from 1991-1996 for the Mathematical and Physical Sci- ences Directorate (MPS). In MPS, he was responsible for a federal grants appropriation of $750 million per year. At the NSF, he also established 25 science and technology centers to support investigative, interdisciplinary research by multiuniversity consortia. Earlier in his career, he catalyzed the Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program in the chemis- try division and it became an NSF-wide activity. Immediately prior to going to Ireland, Dr. Harris was vice president for research and profes- sor of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of South Carolina (USC), overseeing research activities throughout the USC system, several interdisciplinary centers and institutes, the USC Research Foundation, and sponsored research programs. Dr. Harris has authored more than 50 research papers and review articles in spectroscopy and in 1997 became a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In 2004, he received the Wiley Lifetime Achievement Award from California Polytechnic State University. He was elected a member of the Royal Irish Academy in 2005. He earned his undergraduate degree at the College of William and Mary and his Ph.D. in chemistry at USC. Doug Henton is president of Collaborative Economics. He has more than 30 years of experience in economic and community development at the national, regional, state, and local levels. Doug is nationally recognized for his work in bringing industry, government, education, research, and com- munity leaders together around specific collaborative projects to improve regional competitiveness. He was project manager for the start-up of the Joint Venture: Silicon Valley Network, an innovative, results-oriented

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 APPENDIX C regional economic development alliance. Doug directed the strategic planning process involving more than 1,200 corporate, community, and public-sector leaders. He was a senior advisor for the Silicon Valley 00: A Regional Framework for Growing Together. He continues to serve as Joint Venture’s economist, and is the architect of Joint Venture’s annual Index of Silicon Valley. Doug is a consultant to the California Economic Strategy Panel, California’s first state economic strategy process linked to industry clusters and regions. He helped launch collaborative regional efforts in Sacramento and San Diego. He was consultant to the Massachusetts Tech- nology Collaborative. Doug has also advised Chicago Metropolis 2020, the Potomac Conference and Arizona Partnership for a New Economy. Doug founded Collaborative Economics in July 1993 after a decade as assistant director of SRI International’s Center for Economic Competi- tiveness. At SRI, Doug directed local strategy projects in diverse regions, including Austin, Texas. He led major state-level strategy development projects in Arizona, Florida, and California. Internationally, Doug directed major projects on the economic future of Hong Kong, the technopolis strategy in Japan, and regional development in China. With colleagues Kim Walesh and John Melville, Doug has written a book, Grassroots Lead- ers for the New Economy: How Civic Entrepreneurs Are Building Prosperous Communities, which was published by Jossey-Bass in March 1997. Their second book Civic Revolutionaries: Igniting the Passion for Change in Amer- ica’s Communities was published by Jossey-Bass in October 2003. Doug holds a bachelor’s degree in political science and economics from Yale University and a master of public policy degree from the University of California, Berkeley. John McDonald is president and owner of Stone’s Throw, a strategic communications company providing advice and services to organiza- tions engaged in issues impacting children, families and communities. With more than 20 years of communications experience, he brings con- siderable expertise to the campaigns and projects of his clients. He is particularly skilled in working with the news media, the development of strategic campaigns, and the creation of effective communication prod- ucts in print, online, and video formats. Much of John’s work at Stone’s Throw has focused on issues related to public education, and public health. In the process he has helped philanthropic, academic, nonprofit and political organizations to effectively communicate with key audi- ences and to make policy makers and members of the news media more aware of the research, actions and opinions of his clients. A partial list of clients includes: the California Wellness Foundation, the California Fam- ily Health Council, the Center for the Future of Teaching and Learning, The Children’s Partnership, the Cotsen Foundation, the Los Angeles Edu-

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 APPENDIX C cational Partnership, the UC Berkeley—UCLA Health Insurance Policy Program, the University of Southern California Center on Philanthropy and Public Policy, among others. Prior to forming Stone’s Throw, John was communications director for the Los Angeles Educational Partner- ship (LAEP), a nonprofit organization working for the reform of public education in Los Angeles. Through his efforts the organization received extensive national and local recognition, including coverage in Fortune, NewsWeek, Los Angeles Times, New York Times, and other major newspa- per, television and radio news outlets. He also led the development of Principal for a Day, a special event that has become a school involvement model for communities across the nation. John was also press secretary to Leo McCarthy, Lieutenant Governor of California, and worked on the press and advance efforts of Mr. McCarthy’s 1988 campaign for the U.S. Senate. He has also worked in other Democratic political campaigns including Tom Bradley’s 1986 campaign for governor of California. Mr. McDonald also worked for the CBS local news affiliate (KCBS-TV) in Los Angeles and as a freelance writer. His writing has been published in the Los Angeles Times and other major publications. Larry McKinney serves as director of coastal fisheries and senior director of aquatic resources, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department in Austin. He received his Ph.D. from Texas A&M University in 1976 and also was a Smithsonian summer fellow in 1976. From 1977 to 1980, he was a research associate/instructor at Texas A&M University at Galveston, 1977-1980 he was the director, of the Texas Environmental Engineering Field Labora- tory, Galveston 1980-1986. In 1986 he came to the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department where he rose to the director of resource protection in 1988 and to senior director for aquatic resources in 1990. His programmatic responsibilities include a broad range of natural resource issues: water policy, coastal fisheries; assessing and securing freshwater inflows to estu- aries; wetland conservation and restoration; endangered species conser- vation; and, other issues related to the ecological health of Texas aquatic ecosystems. He received the Outstanding Public Service Award from the Nature Conservancy in 1991 and was named the Conservationist of the Year by the Sportsmen Conservationists of Texas in 1992. American Fisheries Society, Texas Chapter named him the Outstanding Fisheries Worker for Administration in 2007. Warren Muir is executive director of the Division on Earth and Life Studies of the National Academies. Chartered by the U.S. Congress in 1863 to honor top scientists, engineers, and doctors with membership, the National Academies are a nongovernmental, nonadvocacy, nonprofit national organization. Each year the National Academies produce hun-

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 APPENDIX C dreds of independent, authoritative, peer-reviewed reports on science and technology issues that have been requested and funded by federal, state, and local government programs and private foundations. The Division on Earth and Life Studies includes twelve boards that produce reports on all aspects of the environment; the life, geological and chemical sci- ences and technology; agriculture; natural resources; radiation; laboratory animals; as well as disasters. It also covers biological, chemical, radio- logical, and nuclear homeland security issues. From 1971-1977, he was senior staff member for environmental health for the Executive Office of the President, Council on Environmental Quality. Dr. Muir served at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) from 1977 to 1981, as first deputy assistant administrator for testing and evaluation and then as director of the office of toxic substances. From 1981 until he joined the staff of the Academies in 1999, he was president of the Hampshire Research Institute and of Hampshire Research Associates, Inc. and was principal investigator and/or author on many studies on risk assessment, pollution prevention, toxic chemicals in commerce, and environmental data. During that time he also was a member of the adjunct faculty of the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. Prior to joining the staff of the National Research Council, Dr. Muir chaired two NRC com- mittees and was a member of three others. In 2003, Dr. Muir received the National Academies Community Service Award. In 1992, HRH Queen Elizabeth conferred upon him the title Officer Brother (O.St.J.), and in 1996 the rank of Commander (C.St.J.) in The Most Venerable Order of St. John of Jerusalem. In 1992, he was part of a team that won the USEPA’s Award for Pollution Prevention and the, USEPA Region 2 Pollution Prevention Award. Dr. Muir received the USEPA Outstanding Service Award in 1980. Dr. Muir is on the board of U.S. nonprofit friendship/peace organizations active in Northern Ireland, Cyprus, and Turkey. Warren received his B.A. from Amherst College. He was awarded M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Northwestern University in chemistry. He has postdoctoral training in epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins University. Matthew C. Nisbet is assistant professor in the School of Communication at American University, Washington, DC. A social scientist who studies the nature and impacts of strategic communication, his current work tracks scientific and environmental controversies and examines the inter- actions among experts, journalists, and various publics. In this research, Nisbet studies how news coverage reflects and shapes policy, how strate- gists try to mold public opinion, and how citizens make sense of contro- versies. He has analyzed a wide range of debates, including those over stem cell research, global warming, intelligent design-creationism, plant biotechnology, and hurricanes. The author of numerous research articles,

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 APPENDIX C his work appears across a number of leading peer-reviewed journals. Over the past four years, these studies have been cited more than a 170 times by other scholars. Nisbet tracks current events related to strate- gic communication at his blog Framing Science. Hosted by Seed Media Group, Framing Science was recently recognized by the New York Daily News as one of the Web’s top political blogs. At American University, Nisbet teaches courses in political communication, communication and society, graduate research, and communication theory. He was previously on the faculty at Ohio State University and he has also taught at Cornell University and Dresden Technical University, Germany. Nisbet is a fre- quently invited lecturer at conferences and meetings across the United States and Canada, and he is often called upon for his expert analysis by major news organizations. Leonard K. Peters has been with Battelle of Columbus, Ohio, since April 2003. From 2003 to 2006, he was director of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. As a Battelle vice president, Dr. Peters focuses on leverag- ing Battelle’s longstanding efforts in science and math education, and in defining Battelle’s partnerships with universities in the area of ultra high-speed, broad-bandwidth networking for research and education purposes. Prior to this role, Dr. Peters was the director of Pacific North- west National Laboratory (PNNL), which is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy and is located in Richland, Washington. He served as director from April 2003 through December 2006. At PNNL, Dr. Peters guided the laboratory of more than 4,000 staff to many successes, including an improved safety and security culture, significant increases in business volume, and enhanced relationships with regional research universities. Dr. Peters came to PNNL after serving as vice provost of research and dean of the graduate school at Virginia Polytechnic Insti- tute and State University. While at Virginia Tech, Dr. Peters managed its diverse research and graduate education programs, ranging from bio- technology and materials to transportation and information technology. As the senior executive responsible for the Research Division, he started a unique program to stimulate and nurture interdisciplinary research. He initiated numerous public-private partnerships, such as between Carilion Health Services, Virginia Tech, and the University of Virginia to create the Carilion Biomedical Institute. Dr. Peters also served as president and chairman of the board of Virginia Tech Intellectual Properties, Inc. (VTIP), a university-affiliated nonprofit corporation. VTIP handles, protects, and licenses technologies developed by faculty, students, and staff at Virginia Tech. He chaired the Committee on Research of the Virginia Research and Technology Advisory Commission. Nationally, Dr. Peters also served as chair of the Council of Graduate Schools and Oak Ridge Associated Uni-

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0 APPENDIX C versities. Prior to his tenure at Virginia Tech, Dr. Peters spent nearly two decades with the University of Kentucky. He began there in 1974 as assis- tant professor of chemical engineering, progressing to his last assignment as acting vice president for research and graduate studies. In addition to faculty and management assignments, Dr. Peters has a distinguished career as a researcher in atmospheric chemistry. His leadership in research and management has earned Dr. Peters many honors and awards, includ- ing a 1990 National Science Foundation Award in Recognition of Contri- butions to Science and Technology in Kentucky. In March 2004, Dr. Peters received the Oak Ridge Associated Universities’ Outstanding Leadership Award. Dr. Peters is a member of the Air and Waste Management Asso- ciation, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Association for Aerosol Research, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the American Society for Engineering Education, and Sigma Xi. He recently served on the Advisory Board for Washington State University’s College of Engineering and Architecture, the Board of Directors for Heritage University (Toppenish, WA), the Board of Directors of the Kadlec Health System, Washington Technology Alliance, Washing- ton Roundtable, and Washington State University Research Foundation; and currently serves on the Board of Directors for VITEX Systems, Inc. and the University of Pittsburgh College of Engineering’s Mascaro Sus- tainability Advisory Board. Dr. Peters earned his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburgh in chemical engineering where he was recognized as a Distinguished Alumnus in 1997. Karl S. Pister is chair of the governing board of the California Council on Science and Technology and chancellor emeritus of the University of California, Santa Cruz. Prior to retirement he completed five decades of service to higher education, beginning as assistant professor in the Department of Civil Engineering at University of California, Berkeley. He served as chairman of the Division of Structural Engineering and Structural Mechanics before his appointment as dean of the College of Engineering in 1980, a position he held for 10 years. From 1985 to 1990 he was the first holder of the Roy W. Carlson chair in engineering. From 1991 to 1996 he served as chancellor of University of California, Santa Cruz. From 1996 to 2000 he served as senior associate to the president and vice president-educational outreach in the University of California Office of the President. He has a Ph.D. in theoretical and applied mechanics from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Matt Sundeen is an attorney and program principal in the Environment, Energy Transportation Program of the National Conference of State Leg- islatures (NCSL). At NCSL, Matt tracks a wide variety of topics and coor-

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 APPENDIX C dinates NCSL’s Science and Technology in Public Policy initiative. He has authored numerous reports and policy briefs, frequently appears on radio and television and has been widely quoted in news publications. Before he came to NCSL, Matt practiced law in Boulder, Colorado. Matt received his law degree from the University of Denver and a B.A. in international studies from Michigan State University. John R. Unger II is a member of the senate of West Virginia. After gradu- ating from Martinsburg High School with honors, Unger began his higher education career at West Virginia University (WVU). During his tenure at WVU, Unger studied biology and liberal arts as a University Honors Scholar and Phi Beta Kappa’s Albert Lee Strum Scholar. There, he also immersed himself in many community and religious projects, including the establishment of the Employment and Training Program, which he also later established in Hong Kong as a missionary of the Evangeli- cal Lutheran Church in America. These projects consequently began his extensive involvement in community interests. From 1988 to 1990, Unger worked for the United States Refugee Program as the Special Assistant to the Director in Hong Kong. There, he worked with Vietnamese refugee children to establish a secure and nurturing environment. John Unger took a year’s leave of absence from WVU to work with Mother Teresa in Calcutta, India, during the monsoons and riots in 1990. There, he coor- dinated the distribution of relief supplies. He also served as a member of the International Rescue Committee and the U.S. State Department Disaster Assistance Response Team providing relief for Kurdish refugees in southern Turkey and northern Iraq following the Persian Gulf War. Upon his return to WVU, John Unger was awarded the United States Presidential Certificate of Merit for national service. Governor Gaston Caperton appointed him to serve on the National and Community Ser- vice Advisory Board from 1991 to 1993. As a board member, he helped in the planning and establishment of the West Virginia Institute for Service Learning. John Unger also helped to establish the West Virginia Campus Compact and WVU’s Office of Service-Learning Program. When disaster hit, Senator Unger assisted with organizing the West Virginia Students United Relief in Florida following Hurricane Andrew. During that time, he coordinated the relief and reconstruction efforts of 120 volunteers. In December 1992, John Unger was named WVU’s twenty-fourth Rhodes Scholar. This distinguished award, established in 1903 by Cecil Rhodes and given annually to 32 scholars nationwide, grants the recipients a two-year study program at Oxford University. He graduated from WVU with a B.A.in biology and liberal arts in 1993 and received his M.A. in economics and economic development from Oxford University. From 1994 to 1995, John Unger returned to Hong Kong, where he served as

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 APPENDIX C political advisor to the Hong Kong Legislative Council. There, he advised and assisted Legislative Councilors on local and international issues and governmental policies. He was extensively involved with the legislation that established Hong Kong’s highest court, the Hong Kong Court of Final Appeal. Unger also served as Deputy Secretary to JUSTICE (The Hong Kong Section of the International Commission of Jurists). During that time, he was instrumental in establishing the Hong Kong Human Rights Monitor and advocating for other human rights legislation prior to the territory’s hand over to the People’s Republic of China in 1997. Return- ing to the United States in 1995, John Unger became engaged in economic development initiatives and remained very active in his community. He was vice president of Van Wyk Enterprises in Martinsburg, West Virginia from 1996-1998; founder and former president of the West Virginia Inter- national Trade Development Council, an organization made up of three economic development authorities in the Eastern Panhandle (Berkeley, Jefferson, and Morgan Counties) that strengthen economic ties between the tri-county region and other countries; founder of the Employment and Training Search Program, the Office of Service Learning at West Virginia University, the West Virginia Campus Compact; a founding Trustee to the Mountain Milestone Summer Day Camp for Mentally and Physically Disabled Youth in West Virginia; founding member of the Board of Direc- tors for the Interfaith Volunteer Caregivers of Berkeley and Morgan Coun- ties; former Chairman of the Disaster Assistance Team–Berkeley County American Red Cross and member of the Disaster Assistance Team; Board of Directors for the Jefferson County American Red Cross; Habitat for Humanity; Family Resource Network for the Eastern Panhandle; EVAK K9 Search and Rescue Team; United Way of Berkeley and Morgan Coun- ties; Chamber of Commerce; Martinsburg Rotary; Eastern Panhandle Business Association; and the West Virginia Farm Bureau. From April to July 2003, Senator Unger served as the director of communications for Save the Children International in Iraq. There, he helped coordinate humanitarian relief, recovery and reconstruction operations and informa- tion management. Senator Unger also focused on providing direct relief and recovery assistance to orphanages, children hospitals, senior care homes and homes for the mentally disabled. Senator Unger was first elected to the West Virginia Senate in 1998 at the age of 29—making him one of the youngest state senators in West Virginia history. He is currently serving his second four-year term. He is chairman of the Senate Transpor- tation and Infrastructure Committee; vice chairman of the Senate Health and Human Resources Committee; chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Workforce, Innovation and New Economy; and chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Bio-Terrorism and Homeland Security. He is a rank- ing member of the Senate Finance, Education, Economic Development,

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 APPENDIX C Agriculture and Interstate Cooperation Committees. He is an advisor to the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory regarding homeland security and economic development. Also, he is pro- ducer and host of WEPM Panhandle Live, a public affairs radio talk show in the Eastern Panhandle.

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