Geochemical Society and is on the editorial board of the journal Chemical Geology.


Andrew H. Knoll is Fisher Professor of Natural History and curator of the Paleobotanical Collections, Botanical Museum, at Harvard University. His geology Ph.D. was also from Harvard University. His research interests are in Precambrian biological and geological evolution, early animal diversification, vascular plant evolution, and the relationship between evolution and environmental change in Earth history. He also has an interest in astrobiology and was a member of the rover science team in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s 2003 mission to Mars. Dr. Knoll has received several awards for his scientific achievements, including the Paleontological Society’s Medal and Charles Schuchert Award and the Society for Sedimentary Geology’s Raymond C. Moore Medal. He has served on Earth and space science advisory groups, including the NRC Space Studies Board and the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences.


Frank M. Richter is Sewell Avery Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of Geophysical Sciences at the University of Chicago. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. Dr. Richter’s research spans both geophysics and geochemistry and includes investigations of mantle convection, thermal evolution of Earth, isotopic dating, pore-water chemistry in sediments, and melt segregation and chemical diffusion in molten rock systems. Both lines of research have led to professional society awards, including the American Geophysical Union’s Bowen Award and the Geological Society of America’s Wollard Award. Dr. Richter has served on numerous NRC solid-earth science committees, including the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources, Geodynamics Committee (chair), Committee on Seismology, and Committee on Basic Research Opportunities in the Earth Sciences. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences.


Leigh H. Royden is professor of geology and geophysics and chair of the Program in Geology and Geochemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She received her Ph.D. from the same institution. Dr. Royden’s research interests include regional geology and geophysics and the mechanics of large-scale continental deformation. She has received the Geological Society of America’s Donath Medal and a Presidential Young Investigator Award. She has served on the Council of the Geological Society of America and is a former member of the NRC Geodynamics Committee and Committee on Basic Research Opportunities in the Earth Sciences. She is a fellow of both the Geological Society of America and the American Geophysical Union.


Roberta L. Rudnick is a professor in the Department of Geology at the University of Maryland. Prior to joining the faculty in 2000, she spent six years as a professor at Harvard University and several years as a research scientist at the Max Planck Institute für Chemie in Mainz, Germany. Dr. Rudnick received her Ph.D. from the Research School of Earth Sciences at Australian National University. Her research focuses on the origin and evolution of the continents, particularly the lower continental crust and the underlying mantle lithosphere. In addition to her research, she is a councillor for the Mineralogical Society of America and editor-in-chief of Chemical Geology. She is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union, the Geological Society of America, and the Mineralogical Society of America and has been a distinguished lecturer for the latter society.


Lars Stixrude is a professor of geophysics and mineral physics at the University of Michigan. He received his Ph.D. in geophysics at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Stixrude investigates the physics of Earth at an atomic level. Predictions of material physics at conditions of Earth’s interior, based on theoretical and laboratory investigations, provide insight into magma generation and transport, the seismic structure of the mantle and core, and the state of water in the deep interior. He is a member of the steering committee for the Cooperative Institute for Deep Earth Research, which is developing an intellectual framework to improve communication among scientists in different disciplines studying the dynamics of Earth’s interior. He is a recipient of the American Geophysical Union’s James B. Macelwane Medal and a fellow of both the Mineralogical Society of America and the American Geophysical Union.



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