Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

John E. Rolph (Chair) is professor of statistics at the Marshall School of Business of the University of Southern California, where he also holds appointments in the mathematics department and the law school. Previously, he spent 24 years as a statistician at the RAND Corporation, 12 of them as head of the statistical research and consulting group. His areas of expertise include statistics and public policy and empirical Bayes estimation. He served as a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC) Committee on National Statistics (CNSTAT) and as chair of the committee from 1998 to 2004; he has also served on the NRC Committee on Law and Justice. He has served on several NRC panels, on topics including statistical and operational test design in defense systems, methods for assessing discrimination, and decennial census methodology. He is an elected member of the International Statistical Institute, a fellow of the American Statistical Association, a fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and a lifetime national associate of the National Academies. He is a past editor of CHANCE magazine and has served in many other editorial capacities. He has a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of California, Berkeley.


Eugene S. Meieran (Vice-Chair) is a fellow at the Intel Corporation, currently working on knowledge management and collaboration applications to help improve manufacturing performance and help individuals and teams make better, faster, and more cost-effective decisions. A member of the National Academy of Engineering, he has taught technical courses at Stanford University and the University of California, Berkeley, and has given seminars and invited talks at many universities throughout the world.



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Appendix B Biographical Sketches of   Committee Members and Staff John E. Rolph (Chair) is professor of statistics at the Marshall School of  Business  of  the  University  of  Southern  California,  where  he  also  holds  appointments  in  the  mathematics  department  and  the  law  school.  Previ- ously, he spent 24 years as a statistician at the RAND Corporation, 12 of  them as head of the statistical research and consulting group. His areas of  expertise  include  statistics  and  public  policy  and  empirical  Bayes  estima- tion.  He  served  as  a  member  of  the  National  Research  Council’s  (NRC)  Committee on National Statistics (CNSTAT) and as chair of the committee  from 1998 to 2004; he has also served on the NRC Committee on Law and  Justice. He has served on several NRC panels, on topics including statisti- cal  and  operational  test  design  in  defense  systems,  methods  for  assessing  discrimination, and decennial census methodology. He is an elected member  of the International Statistical Institute, a fellow of the American Statisti- cal Association, a fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and a  lifetime national associate of the National Academies. He is a past editor of  CHANCE magazine and has served in many other editorial capacities. He  has a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of California, Berkeley. Eugene S. Meieran (Vice-Chair) is a fellow at  the Intel  Corporation,  cur- rently working on knowledge management and collaboration applications  to  help  improve  manufacturing  performance  and  help  individuals  and  teams  make  better,  faster,  and  more  cost-effective  decisions.  A  member  of the National Academy of Engineering, he has taught technical courses  at Stanford University and the University of California, Berkeley, and has  given seminars and invited talks at many universities throughout the world.  

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 APPENDIX B He  has  published  extensively  in  the  fields  of  statistical  process  control,  materials  analysis  and  characterization  technology,  process  and  product  reliability,  and  advanced  technology  applications  for  manufacturing.  He  has received three awards for best paper at international conferences based  on his work in semiconductor device reliability, with particular emphasis  on  the  phenomena  of  electromigration  in  thin  films,  soft  error  upsets  in  dynamic random-access memory devices, and material analysis technology.  He has served on several government and industry panels dealing with man- ufacturing technology and policy issues, such as the Coalition for Intelligent  Manufacturing Systems and the Next Generation Manufacturing Systems  Advanced  Manufacturing  Systems  Board,  and  the  NRC  Board  of  Assess- ment for the National Institute of Standards and Technology. He received  his B.S. degree from Purdue University and his M.S. and Sc.D. degrees from  the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in materials science. Alfred blumstein is J. Erik Jonsson professor of urban systems and opera- tions research and former dean of the H. John Heinz III School of Public  Policy  and  Management,  Carnegie  Mellon  University.  He  is  the  director  of  the  National  Consortium  on  Violence  Research,  supported  by  a  grant  from the National Science Foundation. He has had extensive experience in  both  research  and  policy  with  the  criminal  justice  system,  serving  on  the  President’s Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice  in 1966–1967 as director of its Task Force on Science and Technology. At  the NRC he was a member of the Committee on Research on Law Enforce- ment and the Administration of Justice (now the Committee on Law and  Justice) from its founding in 1976 until 1986, and is currently a member  of the committee. He has also served on the Commission (now Division) of  Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. A member of the National  Academy of Engineering, he holds a bachelor’s degree in engineering and a  Ph.D. in operations research from Cornell University. Alicia Carriquiry  is  professor  of  statistics  at  Iowa  State  University,  where  she has also served as associate provost of the university. Her research has  included applications in forensic statistics, including assessment of the elemen- tal composition of bullet lead. She has spoken at the International Conference  on Forensic Statistics and provided expert guidance and analysis to the NRC  Committee on Scientific Assessment of Bullet Lead Elemental Composition  Comparison. She specializes in linear models, Bayesian statistics, and general  methods.  Her  recent  research  focuses  on  nutrition  and  dietary  assessment.  She is on the editorial board of Bayesian Statistics and an editor for Statisti- cal Science. She is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and is an  elected member of the International Statistical Institute. She received a Ph.D.  in statistics and animal science from Iowa State University

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 BALLISTIC IMAGING Scott Chumbley is professor of materials science and engineering at Iowa  State University, where he holds a joint appointment with Ames Laboratory,  the Department of Energy laboratory at the university. His undergraduate  and graduate degrees are in metallurgy and his field of expertise is materials  characterization using optical and electron microscopy and x-ray diffrac- tion. He has been the principal investigator on an FBI-funded proposal to  study the effects of blast damage on the grain structure of iron and alumi- num  alloys  and  is  currently  working  on  a  project  funded  by  the  Depart- ment  of  Justice  to  quantify  and  statistically  analyze  tool  markings  using  three-dimensional profilometry. He is an active participant in the Midwest  Forensic  Research  Center  (MFRC),  an  educational  and  research  center  of  Iowa  State  University  whose  goal  is  to  provide  resources  and  training  assistance to law enforcement agencies in the Midwest. He holds a Ph.D.  in metallurgical engineering from the University of Illinois. Philip J. Cook  is  ITT/Terry  Sanford  professor  of  public  policy  studies  and  professor  of  economics  and  sociology  at  Duke  University,  where  he  is  a  former  director  of  the  Sanford  Institute  of  Public  Policy.  His  research  covers  a  broad  range  of  policy  analysis,  focusing  on  the  regu- lation  of  unhealthy  and  unsafe  behavior,  including  lotteries;  sources  of  socioeconomic  inequality,  including  the  disparity  in  salaries  between  the  elites in certain professions and the rest of the population; the administra- tion of criminal justice, including the costs of the death penalty; and the  prevention  of  alcohol-related  problems  through  restrictions  on  alcohol  availability. A member of the Institute of Medicine, he has written exten- sively on research on guns and violence, including studies on the costs and  consequences of increased gun availability and the use of firearms tracing  data in studying gun markets. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the Uni- versity of California, Berkeley. Daniel L. Cork is a senior program officer for the Committee on National  Statistics, currently serving as study director of the Panel to Review the Pro- grams of the Bureau of Justice Statistics and as co-study director for the Panel  on the Design of the 2010 Census Program of Evaluations and Experiments  (CPEX).  He  previously  served  as  study  director  of  the  Panel  on  Residence  Rules in the Decennial Census, co-study director of the Panel on Research  on  Future  Census  Methods,  and  program  officer  for  the  Panel  to  Review  the  2000  Census.  His  research  interests  include  quantitative  criminology,  particularly space-time dynamics in homicide; Bayesian statistics; and statis- tics in sports. He holds a B.S. degree in statistics from George Washington  University and an M.S. in statistics and a joint Ph.D. in statistics and public  policy from Carnegie Mellon University.

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 APPENDIX B Marc De graef is professor of materials science and engineering at Carnegie  Mellon University. He has carried out extensive research using conventional  and  advanced  techniques,  including  a  fundamental  study  of  the  use  of  energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy. He is currently studying  magnetostrictive materials using state-of-the-art chemical probes and mag- netic domain analysis. He has also written textbooks on conventional trans- mission electron microscopy for imaging and on crystallography, symmetry  and diffraction for image analysis. He won the Carnegie Mellon George T.  Ladd Research Award in 1996. He has authored or co-authored over 100  publications in the open literature and is an active member of the Miner- als, Metals, and Materials Society (TMS) and the Mineralogical Society of  America. Dr. De Graef received his M.S. in physics from the University of  Antwerp  and  a  Ph.D.  in  physics  from  the  Catholic  University  of  Leuven,  both in Belgium. David L. Donoho is professor of statistics and Anne T. and Robert M. Bass  professor  of  humanities  and  science  at  Stanford  University.  Winner  of  a  MacArthur Fellowship, his ground-breaking research in data analysis and  reconstruction  is  widely  used  and  cited.  This  work  finds  application  in  a  number of different areas ranging from medical imaging to seismology and  astronomy. His earliest work deals with the problem of “blind signal pro- cessing,” recovering a signal that has been blurred in an unknown fashion,  a topic of interest today in cellular phone communication. More recently,  he  has  considered  approaches  for  the  rigorous  use  of  facial  and  retinal  recognition scans for use in airline and other security applications. A large  body of his recent research concerns the theoretical properties of wavelets  (useful  for  pattern  recognition  and  decomposing  digital  images),  and  he  has  developed  a  suite  of  interactive  computer  models  for  exploring  their  properties. He is a former Presidential Young Investigator and a member  of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. A member of the National  Academy of Sciences and honored fellow of the Institute of Mathematical  Statistics,  he  is  a  recipient  of  the  Presidents’  Award  of  the  Committee  of  Presidents  of  Statistical  Societies  and  the  John  von  Neumann  Prize  from  the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. He holds a B.S. from  Princeton University and a Ph.D. from Harvard University. William F. Eddy is professor of statistics at Carnegie Mellon University. A  long-time researcher in statistical computing and graphics, he is co-creator  of the Functional Image Analysis Software-Computational Olio (FIASCO),  a collection of tools for processing very large multidimensional  arrays of  data  originally  developed  for  processing  functional  magnetic  resonance  imaging  (MRI)  data.  It  has  expanded  to  include  analysis  and  interpreta- tion of digital image data, including positron emission tomography (PET) 

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 BALLISTIC IMAGING scanning, genetic microarrays, and optical image data. His research concen- trates on the computational and graphical aspects of statistics; the analysis  has included data sources including 5 billion floating point numbers. His  applications  of  large  datasets  have  also  included  applications  in  disease  mapping, grocery store scanner data, and airline traffic. The current chair  of the Committee on National Statistics, he is also a past chair of the NRC  Committee  on  Applied  and  Theoretical  Statistics.  He  is  a  fellow  of  the  American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Sta- tistical Association, the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and the Royal  Statistical Society, and is an elected member of the International Statistical  Institute.  He  is  affiliated  with  Carnegie  Mellon’s  Center  for  Automated  Learning and Discovery and Center for Cognitive Brain Imaging as well as  the Brain Imaging Research Center (joint with the University of Pittsburgh).  He was the founding co-editor of CHANCE magazine and is the founding  editor  of  the  Journal of Computational and Graphical Statistics.  He  has  an  A.B.  degree  from  Princeton  University,  and  M.A.,  M.Phil.,  and  Ph.D.  degrees from Yale University. gary Fischman is director of the National Materials Advisory Board and  the  Board  on  Manufacturing  and  Engineering  Design  at  the  National  Academies.  Prior  to  joining  the  Academies  staff,  he  was  a  full-time  con- sultant  working  for  the  biomedical  implant  industry.  He  was  director  of  biomaterials and technology at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where  he also served on the faculty of the College of Dentistry with joint appoint- ments in orthopaedic surgery and bioengineering. He was founding director  of the Bioceramics Institute and director of the National Science Founda- tion Industry University for Biosurfaces’ Alfred Satellite during his time as  a faculty member at the New York State College of Ceramics. He has also  worked for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. He holds B.S., M.S.,  and Ph.D. degrees in ceramics engineering. george (Rusty) gray is leader of the dynamic properties and constitutive  modeling  team  in  the  materials  science  division,  Los  Alamos  National  Laboratories.  He  conducts  fundamental,  applied,  and  focused  program- matic  research  on  materials  and  structures.  He  researches  and  constructs  constitutive, damage, and fracture models directly and contributes to pro- cess modeling through the quantification of constitutive property data. The  models are utilized in integrated verification and validation codes and also  to  support  large-scale  finite  element  modeling  simulations  of  structures  ranging from national defense, industry, foreign object damage, and manu- facturing. The models are utilized by the U.S. Navy, Air Force, and Army  for both platform and munitions simulations related  to  performance  and  for manufacturing simulations. He is the project leader for a large Depart-

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 APPENDIX B ment of Defense Office of Munitions program on materials modeling and  validation.  He  is  an  elected  fellow  of  Los  Alamos  National  Laboratory  and has been awarded several professional titles. He has authored or co- authored  over  195  publications.  He  has  a  B.S.  with  honors  and  an  M.S.  in metallurgical engineering from the South Dakota School of Mines and  Technology and a Ph.D. in metallurgical engineering from Carnegie Mellon  University. Eric grimson is professor of computer science and engineering and holds  the  Bernard  Gordon  Chair  of  Medical  Engineering  at  the  Massachusetts  Institute  of  Technology  (MIT).  He  also  holds  a  joint  appointment  as  a  l  ecturer  on  radiology  at  Harvard  Medical  School  and  at  Brigham  and  Women’s Hospital. He currently heads the computer vision group of MIT’s  Computer  Science  and  Artificial  Intelligence  Laboratory,  which  has  pio- neered state-of-the-art systems for activity and behavior recognition, object  and  person  recognition,  image  database  indexing,  image  guided  surgery,  site  modeling,  and  many  other  areas  of  computer  vision.  He  is  a  fellow  of  the  American  Association  for  Artificial  Intelligence  and  was  awarded  the Bose Award for Excellence in Teaching in the School of Engineering at  MIT. He received a B.Sc. (High Honors) in mathematics and physics from  the University of Regina in 1975 and a Ph.D. in mathematics and physics  from MIT in 1980. Daniel Huttenlocher is John P. and Rilla Neafsay professor of computing,  information science, and business and Stephen H. Weiss Fellow at Cornell  University. He also holds an appointment in the computer science depart- ment and is Corning Director of Technology management at the Johnson  G   raduate School of Management at Cornell. His research interests are in  computer  vision,  computational  geometry,  interactive  document  systems,  electronic trading systems, and software development methodologies. His  research in computer vision ranges from theoretical algorithms (using tech- niques from computational geometry and graph algorithms) to the devel- opment of end-to-end systems that apply visual matching and recognition  techniques.  His  work  in  computational  geometry  includes  efficient  algo- rithms for computing Hausdorff distances and related distance transforms,  as well as techniques for comparing three-dimensional protein structures.  His  work  on  interactive  document  systems  has  often  incorporated  com- puter vision techniques. His interest in software development methodolo- gies stems from his involvement in the creation of large, complex software  systems  at  Xerox  Corporation  and  Intelligent  Markets.  For  11  years,  he  worked with Xerox PARC on electronic document image processing. More  recently, he has been working with Intelligent Markets on electronic trad- ing systems. 

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 BALLISTIC IMAGING Michael M. Meyer works for Google, Inc., and is based in Seattle, Washing- ton. Previously, he was co-founder and chief scientist at Intelligent Results,  Inc., a Seattle-based software company specializing in collecting raw data  from  interviews  and  developing  software  to  analyze  large  databases  for  the purpose of predicting behavior with regard to debt collection and the  financing industry. He has held mathematics and engineering analyst posi- tions at the Boeing Company and at Amazon.com. He has also served as  senior research scientist in the department of statistics at Carnegie Mellon  University, where he was director of special projects in computing services  and  director  of  the  applications  software  group  in  computing  services.  From 1991–1992, on a part-time basis, he was study director for the NRC  Panel to Review Evaluation Studies of Bilingual Education. He is a fellow  of the American Statistical Association, in part for his role in the develop- ment  and  maintenance  of  the  Statlib  archive  of  statistical  software  and  data resources. He received a B.A. (with honors) in mathematics from the  University of Western Australia and a Ph.D. in statistics from the University  of Minnesota. vijay Nair  is  Donald  A.  Darling  professor  of  statistics  and  professor  of  industrial  and  operations  engineering  at  the  University  of  Michigan,  and  is currently chair of the department of statistics. He is a world-renowned  expert  in  experimental  design  and  system  development,  particularly  in  industrial  applications.  He  has  done  extensive  consulting  work  with  the  automotive  and  telecommunications  industries,  which  has  required  the  development,  testing,  and  analysis  of  large  databases  for  quality  control.  For example, he developed a structured design and data analysis strategy for  robust design experiments with dynamic characteristics. Such experiments  are being increasingly used to design systems that are robust to uncontrol- lable variation over a range of signal factors. Previously, he was a research  scientist at Bell Laboratories in New Jersey for 15 years. He is a fellow of  the American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Sta- tistical Association, and the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, an elected  member  of  the  International  Statistical  Institute,  and  a  senior  member  of  the American Society for Quality. He served as editor of Technometrics and  as joint editor of International Statistical Reiew. He is currently a member  of the Committee on National Statistics and has served on NRC panels on  statistics and testing in defense acquisition. Dr. Nair received his bachelor’s  degree  in  economics  from  the  University  of  Malaya,  Malaysia,  and  his  Ph.D. in statistics from the University of California, Berkeley. Angelo Ninivaggi is vice president, general counsel, and secretary of Plexus  Corp.,  based  in  Neenah,  Wisconsin.  He  is  an  expert  on  manufacturing  enterprise  practices  in  the  United  States  and  has  both  broad  and  specific 

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9 APPENDIX B familiarity  with  business  and  management  practices,  including  the  legal  issues surrounding product liability, audit responsibility, and supply chain  management.  He  was  executive  vice  president,  general  counsel,  and  cor- porate  secretary  for  MCMS,  another  contract  manufacturing  firm,  until  MCMS  was  acquired  by  Plexus  Corp.  From  March  1996  until  joining  MCMS  in  February  1998,  he  served  as  corporate  counsel  with  Micron  Electronics,  Inc.  Prior  to  his  employment  with  Micron  Electronics,  Inc.,  he worked as an associate with the law firm of Weil, Gotshal & Manges  in  New  York.  Mr.  Ninivaggi  holds  a  B.A.  in  economics  from  Columbia  University, an M.B.A. in finance from Fordham University, and a J.D. from  Fordham University. Carol v. Petrie  is  director  of  the  Committee  on  Law  and  Justice  at  the  National Academies. She also served as the director of planning and man- agement  at  the  National  Institute  of  Justice,  U.S.  Department  of  Justice,  responsible for policy and administration. In 1994, she served as the acting  director of the National Institute of Justice. She has conducted research on  violence  and  public  policy,  and  managed  numerous  research  projects  on  the development of criminal behavior, domestic violence, child abuse and  neglect, and improving the operations of the criminal justice system.  David W. Pisenti is a law enforcement consultant with an extensive back- ground in firearms, SWAT tactics, and armor protection. From 1973–1994,  he served as the supervisory special agent, Firearms Training Unit at the FBI  Academy at Quantico, Virginia. He was president of Progressive Technolo- gies  of  America,  Inc.  (1994–1996)  and  executive  vice  president  of  Point  Blank Body Armor, Inc. (1996–2000). He has developed and implemented  presentations and demonstrations on critical issues involving firearms train- ing,  technological  advances  in  law  enforcement  equipment,  and  tactical  techniques at a wide range of law enforcement and criminal justice profes- sional conferences. Throughout his career, he has advised federal agencies  and  Congress  on  matters  related  to  firearms  and  protective  body  armor,  serving  as  chairman  of  the  National  Institute  of  Justice  National  Armor  Advisory Board, as an advisor to the Congressional Office of Technology  Assessment on body armor legislation, and as chairman of the Weapons and  Protective Systems Committee, Technology Assessment Program Advisory  Council, which advises the National Institute of Justice on the development  of standards for police equipment. Daryl Pregibon works for Google, Inc., and is based in New York City. He  joined  Google  after  serving  as  division  manager  of  the  statistics  research  department at AT&T Laboratories. His research interests include real-time  monitoring  of  large  networks,  analysis  of  very  large  datasets,  and  tree-

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0 BALLISTIC IMAGING based and generalized linear models. He is a world leader in data mining,  which he defines as an interdisciplinary field combining statistics, artificial  intelligence,  and  database  research.  He  is  widely  recognized  as  a  leading  expert in the manipulation and analysis of massive datasets. He has nur- tured successful interactions in fiber and microelectronics manufacturing,  network reliability, customer satisfaction, fraud detection, targeted market- ing, and regulatory statistics. His research contributions have changed from  mathematical statistics to computational statistics and include such topics  as expert systems for data analysis, data visualization, application-specific  data structures for statistics, and large-scale data analysis. A past member  of the Committee on National Statistics, he serves on the NRC Commit- tee on the Technical and Privacy Dimensions of Information for Terrorism  Prevention and Other National Goals. A fellow of the American Statistical  Association, he received his masters degree in statistics from the University  of Waterloo and a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Toronto. Herman M. Reininga  is  senior  vice  president  of  operations  at  Rockwell  Collins,  Cedar  Rapids,  Iowa.  He  is  responsible  for  overall  management  of Rockwell Collins’ global production and material operations, including  manufacturing, material, quality, and facilities and manufacturing activities.  He has served on the Defense Science Board (DSB) and testified in front of  the Senate Armed Services Committee on Defense Technology, Acquisition  and Industrial Base. He chaired DSB’s Production Technology Subgroup for  Weapons  Development  Production  Technology  Summer  Studies  program  that  developed  a  manufacturing  technology  strategy  for  the  U.S.  Depart- ment of Defense. He is also called upon regularly to provide perspective for  future manufacturing strategies. In 1999, he received the prestigious Meri- torious Public Service Citation by the Chief of Naval Research, Department  of  the  U.S.  Navy,  and  in  1998  was  awarded  the  Defense  Manufacturing  Excellence award endorsed by nine national trade associations and profes- sional societies. He holds a B.S. degree in industrial engineering from the  University of Iowa and a master of industrial engineering degree from Iowa  State University. James k. (Chips) Stewart is  senior  fellow  for  law  enforcement  domestic  safety  at  the  CNA  Corporation.  He  previously  held  positions  as  a  prin- ciple  with  Booz,  Allen,  Hamilton  where  he  directed  teams  of  MBAs  and  organization  analysts  in  measuring,  assessing,  and  implementing  perfor- mance  enhancements  for  large  complex  police  organizations.  His  work  there included a project, Validation of Neural Network Ballistic Identifica- tion Reliability in Large Data Sets, for the Federal Bureau of Investiation  and  state  and  local  police  performance.  From  1982–1990,  Mr.  Stewart  served as director of the National Institute of Justice, where, among many 

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 APPENDIX B other accomplishments, he initiated a study of the feasibility of a national  ballistics identification system. He has served as a White House Fellow, as  executive  assistant  to  Attorney  General  William  French  Smith,  and  as  a  Justice Department representative to the Board of Directors of the Interna- tional Association of Chiefs of Police. From 1966–1981, Mr. Stewart served  as the commander of the Criminal Investigations Division of the Oakland  Police Department, where he was responsible for all criminal investigations  carried out by the department, for the development and implementation of  performance standards for detectives, and for the testing of applications of  new technology in criminal investigations. Michael Stonebraker is professor of computer science at the Massachusetts  Institute of Technology specializing in database research and development.  He  was  professor  of  computer  science  at  the  University  of  California,  Berkeley from 1982–1994 and professor of the graduate school there from  1994–1999. A member of the National Academy of Engineering, he pio- neered database research and technology, in particular developing the basis  for the existing relational database market. He was the main architect of the  INGRES relational database management system and the object-relational  POSTGRES system. He is also an editor for the book Readings in Database Systems. He is now working on stream-based data management.  Harry Wechsler (served on the committee until May 2004) is professor of  computer science at George Mason University. Since 1995, he has also been  the  director  of  the  University’s  Distributed  and  Intelligent  Computation  Center. He has done extensive research in the field of intelligent systems,  including computer vision, automatic target recognition, signal and image  processing, pattern recognition, statistical learning theory, neural networks,  and data mining and knowledge discovery. He has also researched face and  gesture recognition, biometrics, and forensics. He has been a consultant for  both government and private industry and has lectured extensively in both  the United States and abroad. He has authored over 200 scientific papers  and  has  published  one  book.  He  is  a  fellow  of  the  Institute  of  Electrical  and  Electronics  Engineers  and  the  International  Association  of  Pattern  Recognition. He holds a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of  California, Irvine. Julia Weertman  is  Walter  P.  Murphy  professor  emerita  of  engineering  at  Northwestern  University.  She  has  conducted  research  on  the  mechanical  behavior of metals and alloys and the underlying phenomena that give rise  to the observed behavior. Her research currently is focused on determining  the  mechanical  properties  of  a  variety  of  nanocrystalline  materials,  char- acterizing  their  structure,  and  studying  deformation  mechanisms  in  this 

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 BALLISTIC IMAGING small grain size regime. She also continues interest in the high temperature  behavior of metals. Her research has demonstrated the value of small angle  neutron scattering for detection and quantification of such features as voids  and  pores,  and  for  following  nucleation  and  growth  kinetics  of  second  phase particles. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering  and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is past  member of the NRC National Materials Advisory Board, the Committee on  Women in Science and Engineering, and the Committee on Human Rights.  She has served on advisory panels for the U.S. Department of Energy and  the  National  Science  Foundation,  and  for  several  national  laboratories.  She is on the Board of Review Editors for Science. She is a fellow of the  Minerals,  Metals  and  Materials  Society  and  ASM  International,  received  Special  Creativity  Awards  for  Research  from  the  National  Science  Foun- dation  in  1981  and  1986,  a  Guggenheim  Fellowship  in  1986–1987,  the  Achievement  Award  from  the  Society  of  Women  Engineers  in  1991,  and  the  Leadership  Award  from  TMS  in  1997.  She  holds  a  B.A.,  M.S.,  and  D.Sci in physics from the Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie  Mellon University).