Appendix E
Committee Member Biographies

June E. Osborn, M.D. (Chair), became the sixth president of the Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation in New York in September 1996, and became president emerita at the end of 2007. She received a B.A. from Oberlin College in 1957 and an M.D. from Case Western Reserve University in 1961. She spent 3 years in training as a pediatric resident at Boston Children’s and Massachusetts General hospitals and then 2 years as a postdoctoral fellow in virology and infectious diseases at Johns Hopkins Medical School and at the University of Pittsburgh. From 1966 to 1984 she was on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin Medical School, where she was a professor in the Departments of Medical Microbiology and of Pediatrics. In 1975 she also became associate dean for biological sciences in the University of Wisconsin Graduate School. From 1984 to 1993 she was dean of the School of Public Health at the University of Michigan. She was also professor of epidemiology in that school and professor of pediatrics and communicable diseases at the University of Michigan Medical School. In 1986 she was elected to membership in the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and from 1995 to 2000 she served as a member of its governing council. In 1994 she was also elected to fellowship in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Beginning in the early 1970s, she began playing advisory roles concerning virology, infectious diseases and vaccines, health care, public health, and public policy for a number of federal agencies and the World Health Organization (WHO). In addition, she has worked with private foundations in designing or advising on specific programs, and from 1990 to 1998 served as a member of the Board of Trustees of the



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Appendix E Committee Member Biographies June E. Osborn, M.D. (Chair), became the sixth president of the Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation in New York in September 1996, and became presi- dent emerita at the end of 2007. She received a B.A. from Oberlin College in 1957 and an M.D. from Case Western Reserve University in 1961. She spent 3 years in training as a pediatric resident at Boston Children’s and Massachusetts General hospitals and then 2 years as a postdoctoral fel- low in virology and infectious diseases at Johns Hopkins Medical School and at the University of Pittsburgh. From 1966 to 1984 she was on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin Medical School, where she was a professor in the Departments of Medical Microbiology and of Pediatrics. In 1975 she also became associate dean for biological sciences in the Uni- versity of Wisconsin Graduate School. From 1984 to 1993 she was dean of the School of Public Health at the University of Michigan. She was also professor of epidemiology in that school and professor of pediatrics and communicable diseases at the University of Michigan Medical School. In 1986 she was elected to membership in the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and from 1995 to 2000 she served as a member of its governing council. In 1994 she was also elected to fellowship in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Beginning in the early 1970s, she began playing advi- sory roles concerning virology, infectious diseases and vaccines, health care, public health, and public policy for a number of federal agencies and the World Health Organization (WHO). In addition, she has worked with private foundations in designing or advising on specific programs, and from 1990 to 1998 served as a member of the Board of Trustees of the 

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 ANTIVIRALS FOR PANDEMIC INFLUENZA Kaiser Family Foundation. From 1984 to 1989 she chaired the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute advisory committee on AIDS, and from 1988 to 1992 was a member of the WHO Global Commission on AIDS. From 1989 to 1993 she was chairwoman of the U.S. National Commission on AIDS. In 2005 she was elected to a 5-year term on the Board of Trustees of the U.S. Pharmacopeia. She has published on topics in virology, infec- tious diseases, AIDS, and public policy. She received the distinguished alumna award from Case Western Reserve Medical School in 1993, and in 1994 she shared with Dr. Mathilde Krim the Scientific Freedom and Responsibility award of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She holds honorary degrees from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (1990), Yale University (1992), Emory Uni- versity (1993), Oberlin College (1993), Medical College of Pennsylvania (1994), Rutgers University (1994), Case Western Reserve University (1997), State University of New York–Stony Brook (1998), and the University of Wisconsin–Madison (2004). Karen G. Gervais, Ph.D., director of the Minnesota Center for Health Care Ethics, received her B.A. from Oberlin College and her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. A philosophy professor for 18 years, in 1989 she transitioned her career into the field of health care ethics. She served as center associate of the Center for Biomedical Ethics at the University of Minnesota; coordinator of the Minnesota Network for Institutional Ethics Committees; Winifred and Atherton Bean Visiting Chair of Profes- sor of Science, Technology, and Society at Carleton College; Visiting Dis- tinguished Professor of Law and Liberal Studies at Hamline University; and Visiting Associate Professor of Philosophy at St. Olaf College. Dr. Gervais’ scholarly interests include clinical and organizational ethics and health policy, public health ethics, access to health care, health disparities, resource allocation, managed care, community benefit responsibilities of nonprofit health care organizations, ethically informed decision making for persons with dementia, and the definition of death. She has served as ethics and policy consultant for the Office of Technology Assessment, Minnesota Council of Health Plans, Minnesota Medical Association, Hen- nepin Medical Society, Minnesota Department of Human Services, Minne- sota Department of Health, Minnesota Attorney General’s Office, Science Museum of Minnesota, American Association of Health Plans, National Council of State Boards of Nursing, and the National Marrow Donor Program. She also served as an ethics advisor to the Minnesota Com- mission on End-of-Life Care and is a member of the Minnesota Depart- ment of Health’s Task Force on Health and Bioterrorism. She is currently co-investigator of the project, “Ethical and Policy Challenges in Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson’s Disease.” In 1987 Dr. Gervais published

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 APPENDIX E Redefining Death (Yale University Press) and in 1999 co-edited Ethical Chal- lenges in Managed Care: A Casebook (Georgetown University Press). She has published in the Hastings Center Report, American Journal of Bioethics, IRB Vaccine, The American Journal of Managed Care, Medical Humanities Review, and Minnesota Medicine, and contributed articles to several edited works, including the Encyclopedia of Bioethics. She is co-author of Allocating Pandemic Influenza Vaccines in Minnesota: Recommendations of the Pandemic Influenza Work Groups Project, a project of the Minnesota Department of Health. She is co-leader of the Minnesota Pandemic Ethics project, also a project of the Minnesota Department of Health. Sandra R. Hernández, M.D., is chief executive officer (CEO) of the San Francisco Foundation. Dr. Hernández is a graduate of Yale University, Tufts School of Medicine, and the John F. Kennedy School of Govern- ment at Harvard University. Prior to becoming CEO of the Foundation, she served as the director of public health for the City and County of San Francisco. She is an assistant clinical professor at the University of California–San Francisco School of Medicine and maintains an active clinical practice in the AIDS clinic at San Francisco General Hospital. Dr. Hernández currently serves on the boards of the Council on Founda- tions, Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, Corporation for Supportive Housing, and National Alliance for Hispanic Health. She is also a trustee of the Western Asbestos Settlement Trust. Her prior affiliations include President Clinton’s Advisory Commission on Consumer Protection and Quality in the Healthcare Industry; the Pew Commission on Environ- mental Health; the Foundation Consortium for California’s Children and Youth; Grantmakers in Health; American Foundation for AIDS Research; the Volunteerism Project; the IOM Committee on the Consequences of Uninsurance; the Latino Community Foundation, a supporting organiza- tion of The San Francisco Foundation; and the California Managed Risk Medical Insurance Board, which is the governing body for California’s Children’s Health Insurance Program. James G. Hodge, Jr., J.D., LL.M., is an associate professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, where he teaches health information privacy law and policy; public health and the law; and bio- ethics and the law. In addition to his primary faculty appointment at Hopkins, he is an adjunct professor of law at Georgetown University Law Center, where he lectures in public health law; bioethics; international human rights; and health law and policy. He is the executive director of the Center for Law and the Public’s Health: A Collaborative at Johns Hopkins and Georgetown Universities; a core faculty member and former Greenwall Fellow of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics; and

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0 ANTIVIRALS FOR PANDEMIC INFLUENZA a faculty member of the Information Security Institute at the Johns Hop- kins Whiting School of Engineering. Through his scholarly and applied work, Professor Hodge delves deeply into multiple areas of public health law, ethics, and human rights. The recipient of the 2006 Henrik L. Blum Award for Excellence in Health Policy from the American Public Health Association, he has drafted (with others) several public health law reform initiatives, including the Model State Public Health Information Privacy Act, the Model State Emergency Health Powers Act, the Turning Point Model State Public Health Act, and the Uniform Emergency Volunteer Health Practitioners Act. His diverse funded projects include work on (1) the legal framework underlying the use of volunteer health profession- als during emergencies; (2) the compilation, study, and analysis of state genetics laws and policies; (3) historical and legal bases underlying school vaccination programs; (4) international tobacco policy for WHO’s Tobacco Free Initiative; (5) legal and ethical distinctions between public health practice and research; (6) legal underpinnings of partner notification and expedited partner therapies; and (7) public health law case studies in many states. He is a national expert on public health information privacy law and ethics. He consulted with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on its creation of a Health Information Privacy Office and with other federal health agencies on privacy issues. Additional areas of research include new federalism, HIV/AIDS, partner notification, legal approaches to bioethics, and human rights. Nicole Lurie, M.D., M.S.P.H., is director of the RAND Center for Popula- tion Health and Health Disparities and co-director of the RAND Center for Domestic and International Health Security. She is also a senior natural scientist and the Paul O’Neill Alcoa Professor of Health Policy at RAND. Previously, Dr. Lurie was a professor of medicine and public health at the University of Minnesota, and most recently, medical advisor to the Com- missioner at the Minnesota Department of Health. From 1998 to 2001, she served as principal deputy assistant secretary of health in the U.S. Depart- ment of Health and Human Services (DHHS). She had line responsibility for the Office of Emergency Preparedness, which included development of emergency response plans at state and local levels, including plans for events involving multiple jurisdictions and development of the pandemic influenza plan. She was involved with flu surveillance and response at a time when hospitals in multiple jurisdictions across the country were full, with multiple preparedness and response exercises, and with other efforts to directly link public health and health delivery sectors. Dr. Lurie’s research has focused on health services, primarily in the areas of access to and quality of care, managed care, mental health, prevention, and health disparities. She is leading a collaborative effort, centered at RAND, to study the impact of changes in the health care safety net in the District

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 APPENDIX E of Columbia, and to develop a collaborative, public–private health data infrastructure for the District and the region. Dr. Lurie serves as senior editor for Health Services Research and has served on editorial boards and as a reviewer for numerous journals. She was president of the Society of General Internal Medicine, is currently on the board of directors for the Academy of Health Services Research (AHSR), and has served on multi- ple national committees. She is the recipient of numerous awards, includ- ing the AHSR Young Investigator Award, the Nellie Westerman Prize for Research in Ethics, and the Heroine in Health Care Award. Dr. Lurie attended medical school at the University of Pennsylvania, and completed her residency and M.S.P.H. at the University of California, Los Angeles, where she was also a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar. Dr. Lurie, an IOM member, has served on several IOM committees and is currently the chair of the IOM Roundtable on Health Disparities. Andrew T. Pavia, M.D., is the George and Esther Gross Presidential Professor and chief of the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at the University of Utah Health Sciences Center and Primary Children’s Hospital. He received his B.A. and M.D. at Brown University. He trained in internal medicine and pediatrics at Dartmouth and the University of Utah, held an infectious disease fellowship at the University of Utah, and trained in public health epidemiology as an Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) officer and a preventive medicine resident at CDC. He is involved in the care of adults, pregnant women, and children with HIV and children with other infectious diseases. His research interests include the epide- miology of influenza and other emerging infections, vaccine-preventable diseases, and HIV/AIDS, with a particular interest in the treatment of HIV in women and children and prevention of mother-to-child transmis- sion. He is a member of the National Vaccine Advisory Committee and chairs the Vaccine Safety Subcommittee, and he is chair of the National and Global Public Policy Committee and the Pandemic Influenza Task Force of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. He is on the editorial board of JAIDS, he is a section editor for Current Infectious Disease Reports, and he is a reviewer for numerous journals. He has published more than 100 scientific articles and chapters. M. Patricia Quinlisk, M.D., M.P.H., is a medical epidemiologist practicing at the Iowa Department of Public Health, where she functions as both the medical director and the state epidemiologist. Her background includes training as a clinical microbiologist (MT(ASCP)); training microbiologists while serving as a Peace Corps volunteer in Nepal; an M.P.H. from Johns Hopkins (with a emphasis in infectious disease epidemiology); an M.D. from the University of Wisconsin; and training as a field epidemiologist in CDC’s Epidemic Intelligence Service. Yearly, for 12 years, she conducted

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 ANTIVIRALS FOR PANDEMIC INFLUENZA week-long epidemiologic training courses in Europe. She is a professor at the University of Iowa, the University of Wisconsin–La Crosse, and Iowa State University, and lectures regularly at these and other Mid- western educational institutions. She serves or has served on several national advisory committees, including the National Vaccine Advisory Committee, the Subcommittee for Vaccine Safety and Communication, the Advisory Committee of the U.S. Marine Corps Chemical/Biological Incident Response Force, the Department of Defense’s Panel to Assess the Capabilities for Domestic Response to Terrorist Acts Involving Weapons of Mass Destruction (the Gilmore Commission), and the Management Committee of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officers, and as president of the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists. She has testified before two congressional subcommittees on public health about terrorism and participated on the IOM’s Committees on Microbial Threats to Health in the 21st Century, The Psychological Consequences of Terrorism, and Modeling Community Containment for Pandemic Influ- enza. She was also on the National Academy of Sciences’ Committee on Animal Health at the Crossroads, and Board of Scientific Counselors for CDC’s National Center for Infectious Diseases. She serves on CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report editorial board, and is an editor for the Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal. She was recently appointed to the National Biodefense Science Board established by DHHS. Eileen Scanlon, R.N., M.S.N., is a public health nurse supervisor with New York’s Nassau County Department of Health. She is a registered nurse who received her undergraduate degree from Long Island Univer- sity at C.W. Post and her M.S. in emergency nursing and disaster man- agement at Adelphi University. Her experiences as a public health nurse in the Nassau County Department of Health have included all areas of community and public health nursing. She currently directs the Office of Public Health Preparedness, which is an integrated multidisciplinary team preparing for disasters. Her office has received national recognition for the development of the Nassau County Medical Reserve Corps. Ms. Scanlon was recognized by the Nassau County Fire Commission in 2006 for the work she did with the fire service in training them to prophylax themselves for a biological event. Ms. Scanlon was honored by the New York State Office of the Assembly in August 2006 and the Town of Oyster Bay, New York, in April 2007 for the work she has done on community public health preparedness. Ms. Scanlon has presented at numerous con- ferences, including the Long Island Emergency Management Conference, New York State Association of County Health Officials meeting, the Uni- versity of California–Los Angeles’s Disaster Preparedness Conference, and the American Public Health Association Conference.