in IT R&D and deployment so that the United States can retain a global lead position in areas where it has particular mission requirements.

CONCLUSION

The globalization of the world’s economy is a fact that cannot be ignored. The global IT R&D landscape now is quite different from what it was in 1995. To thrive in this new environment, the United States should play to its strengths, notably its continued leadership in conceptualizing the idea-intensive new concepts, products, and services that the rest of the world desires. This is the area in which the greatest increments of value added are captured.

Toward this end, it is necessary for the United States to have the best-funded and most-creative research institutions; to develop and attract the best technical and entrepreneurial talent among its own people as well as from around the world; to make its economy the world’s most attractive for forming new ventures and growing small, innovative firms; and to create the environment to ensure the deployment of the most advanced technology infrastructure, applications, and services here in the United States for the benefit of our people, institutions, and firms.

The committee trusts that this report will be useful to policy makers and the public in helping the nation achieve these goals and in fostering a vibrant and thriving U.S. IT R&D ecosystem for many decades to come.



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