Study Committee Biographical Information

Henry G. Schwartz, Jr., Chair, is a nationally recognized civil and environmental engineering leader who spent most of his career with Sverdrup Civil, Inc. (now Jacobs Civil, Inc.), which he joined as a registered professional engineer in 1966. In 1993, Schwartz was named President and then Chairman, directing the transportation, public works, and environmental activities of Sverdrup/Jacobs Civil, Inc., before retiring in 2003. Dr. Schwartz’s projects included multibillion-dollar water and wastewater treatment systems for the cities of San Diego, San Francisco, and Detroit, as well as large civil infrastructure projects, such as highways, bridges, dams, and railroads. Following his retirement, Dr. Schwartz was appointed Senior Professor and Director of the Engineering Management Program at Washington University in St. Louis, a position he held until fall 2006. He has served on the advisory boards for Carnegie Mellon University, Washington University, and the University of Texas, Austin, and is President of the Academy of Science of St. Louis. He is Founding Chairman of the Water Environment Research Foundation and has served as President of the Water Environment Federation. Dr. Schwartz is Past President of the American Society of Civil Engineers and was a member of the Civil Engineering Research Foundation Board of Directors. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1997 (Section 4: Civil Engineering) and has served on National Research Council (NRC) study committees, including the Committee for a Future Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP), and on the NRC Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment and the Executive Committee of the Transportation Research Board (TRB). Dr. Schwartz received a PhD from the California Institute of Technology and master of science and bachelor of science degrees from Washington University; he also attended Princeton University and Columbia University’s business program.



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Study Committee Biographical Information Henry G. Schwartz, Jr., Chair, is a nationally recognized civil and envi- ronmental engineering leader who spent most of his career with Sverdrup Civil, Inc. (now Jacobs Civil, Inc.), which he joined as a registered profes- sional engineer in 1966. In 1993, Schwartz was named President and then Chairman, directing the transportation, public works, and environ- mental activities of Sverdrup/Jacobs Civil, Inc., before retiring in 2003. Dr. Schwartz’s projects included multibillion-dollar water and wastewater treatment systems for the cities of San Diego, San Francisco, and Detroit, as well as large civil infrastructure projects, such as highways, bridges, dams, and railroads. Following his retirement, Dr. Schwartz was appoint- ed Senior Professor and Director of the Engineering Management Program at Washington University in St. Louis, a position he held until fall 2006. He has served on the advisory boards for Carnegie Mellon University, Washington University, and the University of Texas, Austin, and is President of the Academy of Science of St. Louis. He is Founding Chairman of the Water Environment Research Foundation and has served as President of the Water Environment Federation. Dr. Schwartz is Past President of the American Society of Civil Engineers and was a mem- ber of the Civil Engineering Research Foundation Board of Directors. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1997 (Section 4: Civil Engineering) and has served on National Research Council (NRC) study committees, including the Committee for a Future Strategic High- way Research Program (SHRP), and on the NRC Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment and the Executive Committee of the Transportation Research Board (TRB). Dr. Schwartz received a PhD from the California Institute of Technology and master of science and bache- lor of science degrees from Washington University; he also attended Princeton University and Columbia University’s business program. 273

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274 Potential Impacts of Climate Change on U.S. Transportation Alan C. Clark is Director of the Houston–Galveston Area Council’s (H- GAC’s) metropolitan planning organization (MPO), which is responsible for development of the region’s multimodal transportation plans and air quality programs. The MPO’s Transportation Policy Council approves the programming of all federal highway and transit funds in Harris County and the seven adjacent counties. Mr. Clark’s responsibilities also include coordinating the Houston–Galveston area’s response to mandates contained in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. He has been a transportation planner with H-GAC since 1983 and has managed its trans- portation and air quality programs since 1986. Mr. Clark has served as an Adjunct Professor with Texas Southern University. Before coming to H-GAC, he worked as a transportation planner with the Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County and as a traffic engineering consultant. He currently serves on the advisory councils of the Texas Transportation Institute and the Center for Transportation Training and Research at Texas Southern University. In 2006 he was appointed to the Federal Advisory Committee for the U.S. Climate Change Science Program study on the Impacts of Climate Variability and Change on Transportation Systems and Infrastructure—Gulf Coast Case Study. Mr. Clark holds master’s degrees in civil engineering and in city and regional planning from Ohio State University. He completed his undergraduate degree in business adminis- tration at the University of Tennessee. G. Edward Dickey is a consultant in water resources policy and planning; Senior Advisor providing policy, political, and technical advice and repre- sentation services on the planning and implementation of large-scale water projects at Dawson and Associates, a Washington-based representation firm; and Affiliate Professor of Economics at Loyola College in Maryland. He is former Chief of the Planning Division of the Headquarters Office of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and former Acting Assistant Secretary of the Army (Civil Works). Dr. Dickey has served on numerous NRC committees, including the Committee to Review the New York City Watershed Management Strategy, the Committee for the Study of Freight Transportation Capacity for the Next Century, and most recently the Panel on Adaptive Management for Resource Stewardship. He received PhD and master of art degrees in economics from Northwestern Uni- versity and a bachelor of arts degree in political economy from the Johns Hopkins University.

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Study Committee Biographical Information 275 George C. Eads is Senior Consultant at CRA International, Inc. [formerly Charles River Associates (CRA)] in its Washington, D.C., office. Before joining CRA in 1995, he held several positions at General Motors (GM) Corporation, including Vice President and Chief Economist; Vice President, Worldwide Economic and Market Analysis Staff; and Vice President, Product Planning and Economics Staff. Before joining GM, Dr. Eads was Dean of the School of Public Affairs at the University of Maryland, College Park, where he also was a professor. Before that, he served as a member of President Carter’s Council of Economic Advisors. He has been involved in numerous projects concerning transport and energy. In 1994 and 1995 he was a member of President Clinton’s policy dialogue on reducing greenhouse gas emissions from personal motor vehicles, popularly known as “Car Talk.” He coauthored the World Energy Council’s 1998 Report Global Transport and Energy Development: The Scope for Change. From 2000 to 2004, Dr. Eads devoted most of his time to the World Business Council for Sustainable Development’s Sustainable Mobility Project, a project funded and carried out by 12 leading inter- national automotive and energy companies. During the first stage of this project, he led the CRA contingent on the CRA–Massachusetts Institute of Technology team that together produced the project’s first report, Mobility 2001: World Mobility at the End of the Twentieth Century and Its Sustainability. As lead consultant during the project’s second and final phase, Dr. Eads drafted the project’s final report, Mobility 2030: Meeting the Challenges to Sustainability, which was released in summer 2004 in Brussels, Detroit, and Tokyo. Dr. Eads is a member of the Presidents’ Circle at the National Academies and has served on the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on the Consequences of Uninsurance. He is an at-large Director of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He received a PhD in economics from Yale University. Robert E. Gallamore is currently a private consultant, having recently retired as Director of the Transportation Center and Professor of Managerial Economics and Decision Sciences in the Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University. Before joining the university in August 2001, he was an executive on loan from Union Pacific Railroad to the Transportation Technology Center in Pueblo, Colorado, where he was Assistant Vice President of Communications Technologies and General Manager of the North American Joint Positive Train Control Program.

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276 Potential Impacts of Climate Change on U.S. Transportation He has also served in several positions with the federal government, including Deputy Federal Railroad Administrator and Associate Administrator for Planning of the Urban Mass Transportation Administration. Dr. Gallamore served as Chairman of the TRB Committee for a Study of the Feasibility of a Hazardous Materials Transportation Cooperative Research Program and the Committee on Freight Transportation Information Systems Security. He also served as a member of the TRB Committee for a Review of the National Transportation Science and Technology Strategy, the Steering Committee for a Conference on Railroad Research Needs, and the Transportation Panel of the Committee on Science and Technology for Countering Terrorism. Dr. Gallamore currently chairs the NRC Committee for Review of the Federal Railroad Administration Research and Development Program. He received a PhD in political economy and government from Harvard University. Genevieve Giuliano is Senior Associate Dean of Research and Technology, Director of the METRANS Transportation Center, and Professor in the School of Policy, Planning, and Development at the University of Southern California. Dr. Giuliano’s research interests include the relationship between land use and transportation, transportation policy evaluation, travel behavior, and the role of information technology in transportation. She has published more than 130 papers and reports and has presented her research at numerous conferences in the United States and abroad. She is currently a member of two international research consortia and serves on the editorial boards of several professional journals. She is a former mem- ber and chair of the TRB Executive Committee and a National Associate of the National Academies. Dr. Giuliano has served on several NRC and TRB policy study committees, including the Committee for the Study of Impacts of Highway Capacity Improvements on Air Quality and Energy Consumption; the Committee on Metropolitan Area Governance; the Committee on International Comparison of National Policies and Expectations Affecting Public Transit; the Committee for the Evaluation of the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program; and the Committee on Transportation, Land Use, Physical Activity, and Health. She is currently chairing the TRB policy study Committee on Funding Options for Freight Transportation Projects of National Significance. Dr. Giuliano is also founding Chair of the California Transportation Research and

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Study Committee Biographical Information 277 Technology Advisory Panel. She received a PhD in social sciences from the University of California at Irvine. William J. Gutowski, Jr., is Professor of Meteorology in the Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences at Iowa State University. His research is focused on the role of atmospheric dynamics in climate, with emphasis on the dynamics of the hydrologic cycle and regional climate. Dr. Gutowski’s research program entails a variety of modeling and data analysis approaches to capture the necessary spatial and temporal scales of these dynamics and involves working through the Regional Climate Modeling Laboratory at Iowa State University. His work also includes regional modeling of Arctic, African, and East Asian climates and involves collaboration with scientists in these regions. Dr. Gutowski received a PhD in meteorology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a bachelor of science degree in astronomy and physics from Yale University. Randell H. Iwasaki was appointed Chief Deputy Director of the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) in November 2004. In that capacity, he manages the day-to-day operations of the department, including an operating budget of nearly $13 billion and more than 21,000 employees. A licensed civil engineer, Mr. Iwasaki has been with Caltrans for more than 20 years and has served as the department’s Interim Director; Deputy Director for Maintenance and Operations; Director of Caltrans District 4, covering nine counties in the San Francisco Bay Area; and Director of Caltrans District 9, covering the eastern portion of the state. Mr. Iwasaki is a board member of the Intelligent Transportation Society of America, the Foundation for Pavement Preservation, and the Asian Pacific State Employee Association Foundation. He is chair of the SHRP 2 Technical Coordinating Committee for Renewal Research and serves on a TRB National Cooperative Highway Research Program panel on work zone safety. He was also recently appointed to the ITS Advisory Committee to Secretary Peters of the U.S. Department of Transportation. Mr. Iwasaki earned a bachelor’s degree in engineering from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, and a master’s degree in environmental engineering from California State University, Fresno. Klaus H. Jacob is Special Research Scientist at the Lamont–Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, where he retired from a full-time

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278 Potential Impacts of Climate Change on U.S. Transportation position in 2001. He is also an Adjunct Professor at the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University, where he teaches disaster risk management. During the first two decades of his 36-year career with Columbia University, Dr. Jacob focused his research on basic earth physics and plate-tectonic processes. In 1986 he cofounded the National Science Foundation–supported National Center for Earthquake Engineering Research, where he worked on engineering and risk manage- ment applications for seismic hazards assessment and design criteria for large infrastructure projects. He has also worked intensively with federal, state, and local emergency management communities on risk mitigation strategies. Dr. Jacob’s recent research efforts include studying how global climate change and related sea level rise affect the risks from coastal storm surges, flooding, and inundation, primarily of infrastructure systems. This research was applied in the recent Metropolitan East Coast Regional Assessment, which examined the impacts of climate change scenarios on the New York metropolitan area’s transportation infrastructure, among other impact areas. Dr. Jacob has authored or coauthored more than 140 scientific and technical publications and book chapters. He is a member of the American Geophysical Union, the Seismological Society of America, the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute, the American Geological Institute, and the New York Academy of Sciences. Dr. Jacob holds a doc- torate in geophysics from Goethe University (Frankfurt, Germany), a master of science degree in geophysics from Guttenberg University (Mainz), and a bachelor of science degree in mathematics and physics from the Technical University in Darmstadt. Thomas R. Karl is Director of the National Climatic Data Center, a facil- ity of the Commerce Department’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, a position he has held since 1998. Before that, he was Senior Scientist at the climate center, where he analyzed global climate change, extreme weather events, and trends in global and U.S. climate over the past 100 years. Dr. Karl is a Fellow of the American Meteorological Society and the American Geophysical Union and past Chair of the Division on Earth and Life Sciences’ Climate Research Committee. He has edited numerous journals, has authored more than 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, was lead author on several Intergovernmental Panel Assessments of climate change, and served as Cochair of the U.S. National Climate Assessment. In 2006 he was appointed to the Federal Advisory

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Study Committee Biographical Information 279 Committee for the U.S. Climate Change Science Program study on the Impacts of Climate Variability and Change on Transportation Systems and Infrastructure—Gulf Coast Case Study. Dr. Karl received an honorary doctorate from North Carolina State University, a master’s degree in mete- orology from the University of Wisconsin, and a bachelor’s degree from Northern Illinois University. Robert J. Lempert is Senior Scientist at the Rand Corporation and an expert in science and technology policy, with a special focus on climate change, energy, and the environment. An internationally known scholar in the field of decision making under conditions of deep uncertainty, Dr. Lempert is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the National Academies’ Climate Research Committee, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Dr. Lempert is leading a National Science Foundation–funded study on the use of scientific and other information for climate change decision making under conditions of uncertainty. He has led studies on climate change policy, long-term policy analysis, and science and technology investment strategies for such clients as the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, and a variety of multinational firms. A Professor of Policy Analysis in the Rand Graduate School, Dr. Lempert teaches a course on complex adaptive systems and policy analysis. He authored the book Shaping the Next One Hundred Years: New Methods for Quantitative, Longer-Term Policy Analysis. Dr. Lempert holds a PhD in applied physics from Harvard University and a BAS degree in physics and political science from Stanford University. Luisa M. Paiewonsky is Commissioner of the Massachusetts Highway (MassHighway) Department, where she oversees a combined annual capi- tal and operating budget of $890 million, manages 1,850 employees, and has responsibility for more than 9,500 lane miles of roadway and 2,800 bridges. Before her appointment as Commissioner in 2005, Ms. Paiewonsky served as Assistant Secretary of the Executive Office of Transportation and before that as Deputy Commissioner of MassHighway, responsible for the day-to-day operations of the commonwealth’s road and bridge program. Ms. Paiewonsky rose through the MassHighway ranks with a series of promotions that included a 4-year term as Director of the Bureau of Transportation Planning and Development and Project

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280 Potential Impacts of Climate Change on U.S. Transportation Manager for the $35 million Southeast Expressway High-Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) project. She spearheaded MassHighway’s participation in the development of the Anderson Regional Transportation Center, built on a former Superfund site. Ms. Paiewonsky is President of the Boston Chapter of the Women’s Transportation Seminar and a member of the Northeast Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. She serves as a Massachusetts representative to TRB and is secretary of TRB’s HOV Systems Committee. Ms. Paiewonsky graduated from Mount Holyoke College with a bachelor’s degree in political science and Spanish. She holds a master’s degree in city planning from Boston University. Christopher R. Zeppie is Director of the Office of Environmental Policy, Programs, and Compliance at the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. Since coming to the Port Authority in 1979, Mr. Zeppie has held positions of increasing responsibility as Environmental Compliance Specialist; Manager, Permits and Governmental Approvals; Attorney, Environmental Law Division; Assistant Director, Office of Environmental Management; and Chief Environmental Policy Officer. He is a member of the Dean’s Council at the State University of New York at Stony Brook’s School of Marine and Atmosphere Studies, the Advisory Committee of the Environmental Division of the New York Academy of Sciences, the Review Panel for the Stony Brook Storm Surge Research Group Investigation of the Hydrologic Feasibility of Storm Surge Barriers to Protect the Metropolitan New York–New Jersey Region, and a Stakeholder Partner of the Infrastructure Group for the Metropolitan East Coast Regional Assessment. Mr. Zeppie was appointed by Mayor Bloomberg to serve on the Jamaica Bay Watershed Advisory Committee and will be rep- resenting the Port of New York and New Jersey as a delegate to the C40 Conference working group on Port Facilities in Rotterdam. He holds a bachelor of science degree in biology and ecology from Manhattan College, a master’s degree in marine environmental science from State University of New York at Stony Brook, and a JD degree from St. John’s University School of Law.