Appendix F
Biographical Sketches for Committee on Advancing Desalination Technology

Amy K. Zander, Chair, is professor and director of the Interdisciplinary Engineering and Management program at Clarkson University, New York. Her research interests include drinking water treatment, treatment process design, membrane systems in environmental separations, life cycle assessment, and industrial ecology. Dr. Zander has received numerous awards for her research and teaching, including the 2003 Samuel Arnold Greeley Award from ASCE for the paper that makes the most valuable contribution to the environmental engineering profession, the 2000 AEESP/McGraw-Hill Award for Outstanding Teaching in Environmental Engineering and Science, and the 2001 Boeing Outstanding Educator Award. Prior to joining the faculty at Clarkson, she was a water quality specialist with the Texas Water Commission and an engineer with James M. Montgomery Consulting Engineers. Dr. Zander served on the NRC Committee on Small Water Supply Systems and the Committee on Assessment of Water Resources Research. She received her B.S. in biology and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in civil engineering from the University of Minnesota.


Menachem Elimelech chairs the Department of Chemical Engineering and directs the Environmental Engineering Program of Yale University. He is also the Roberto C. Goizueta Professor of Environmental and Chemical Engineering. His research interests include fouling mechanisms of reverse osmosis and nanofiltration membranes, a novel forward osmosis desalination process, concentration polarization of interacting solute particles in crossflow membrane filtration, removal of natural hormones and pharmaceuticals by reverse osmosis and nanofiltration membranes, and membrane surface characteristics on



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Appendix F Biographical Sketches for Committee on Advancing Desalination Technology Amy K. Zander, Chair, is professor and director of the Interdisciplinary Engineering and Management program at Clarkson University, New York. Her research interests include drinking water treatment, treatment process design, membrane systems in environmental separations, life cycle assessment, and industrial ecology. Dr. Zander has received numerous awards for her research and teaching, including the 2003 Samuel Arnold Greeley Award from ASCE for the paper that makes the most valuable contribution to the environmental engineering profession, the 2000 AEESP/McGraw-Hill Award for Outstanding Teaching in Environmental Engineering and Science, and the 2001 Boeing Outstanding Educator Award. Prior to joining the faculty at Clarkson, she was a water quality specialist with the Texas Water Commission and an engineer with James M. Montgomery Consulting Engineers. Dr. Zander served on the NRC Committee on Small Water Supply Systems and the Committee on Assessment of Water Resources Research. She received her B.S. in biology and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in civil engineering from the University of Minnesota. Menachem Elimelech chairs the Department of Chemical Engineering and directs the Environmental Engineering Program of Yale University. He is also the Roberto C. Goizueta Professor of Environmental and Chemical Engineering. His research interests include fouling mechanisms of reverse osmosis and nanofiltration membranes, a novel forward osmosis desalination process, concentration polarization of interacting solute particles in crossflow membrane filtration, removal of natural hormones and pharmaceuticals by reverse osmosis and nanofiltration membranes, and membrane surface characteristics on 293

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294 Desalination: A National Perspective membrane fouling. Dr. Elimelech is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and was awarded the 2005 Clark Prize for outstanding achievement in water science and technology. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and his Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the Johns Hopkins University. David H. Furukawa is the president of Separation Consultants, Inc., a desalination consulting company. He has provided technical, management, and strategic assistance to institutions, communities, municipalities, nations, and private companies on desalination projects. Previously, he headed the saline water and demineralization section of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation in the 1960s. He worked in various positions for UOP Fluid Systems, Boyle Engineering Corporation, Resources Conservation Corporation/Ionics, Inc., and FilmTech/Dow Chemical Company before heading Separation Consultants. Mr. Furukawa has served as president and director of the International Desalination Association and president of the American Desalting Association. Currently, he is chair of the Research Advisory Board for the National Water Research Institute and vice-moderator of the Research Advisory Council for the Middle East Desalination Research Center. He has authored more than 60 publications and is patented in the field. He received his B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of Colorado. Peter Gleick is co-founder and president of the Pacific Institute for Studies in Development, Environment, and Security in Oakland, California, a nonpartisan policy research group addressing global environmental and development issues, especially in the area of freshwater resources. Dr. Gleick’s research and writing address the hydrologic impacts of climate change, sustainable water use, desalination, privatization and globalization, and international conflicts over water resources. He is an internationally recognized water expert, and in 2003 he was named a MacArthur Fellow. He is a former member of the Water Science and Technology Board and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2006. He received his B.S. in engineering and applied science from Yale University and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in energy and natural resources from the University of California, Berkeley. Kenneth R. Herd is water supply program director of the resources projects department of the Southwest Florida Water Management

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Appendix F 295 District. Formerly, he was the director of operations and facilities of Tampa Bay Water in Clearwater, Florida. He headed the operation and maintenance of a 250 million gallon per day water system, which has groundwater, surface water, and desalinated seawater components. He also oversaw facility construction, instrumentation and control, water quality, and other functions. From 2001-2008, he headed the Tampa Bay Seawater Desalination project, the largest seawater desalination plant in North America. Prior to this position, he managed engineering and project development efforts at Tampa Bay Water including the development of Tampa Bay Water’s master water plan. He is a licensed professional engineer in Florida. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of Kentucky in Lexington. Kimberly L. Jones is associate professor of civil engineering at Howard University. Her research interests include methods for optimizing membrane processes for water treatment and biomedical applications, methods to reduce membrane fouling, mass transport, interfacial phenomenon, water and wastewater treatment plant design, and water quality. She is currently Deputy Director of the Keck Center for the Design of Nanoscale Materials for Molecular Recognition. Dr. Jones served on the NRC Committee to Review the Desalination and Water Purification Technology Roadmap and Committee on Environmental Decision Making: Principles and Criteria for Models. She joined the Water Science and Technology Board as a member in 2006. Dr. Jones received her B.S. and M.S. degrees in civil engineering from Howard University and the University of Illinois, respectively, and her Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the Johns Hopkins University. Philip Rolchigo is the Vice President of Water Technologies at Pentair, Inc. Prior to this position he led the Global Separation Technologies section of General Electric, Water and Process Technologies. Formerly he was the chief technology officer and led the research and development division of Osmonics, Inc., a global manufacturer of high-technology water purification and separation technologies, which was later acquired by General Electric. He was also vice president of research, development, and engineering for Membrex, where he helped develop leading-edge membrane and filtration technologies. Dr. Rolchigo received his B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of Rochester in New York and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in chemical and biochemical engineering from the University of Pennsylvania.

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296 Desalination: A National Perspective Sandeep Sethi is a project manager and southeast region R&D lead at Carollo Engineers. His work experience spans over 15 years in desalination, membrane technology, and concentrate management projects. He has served as project manager, principal investigator, technical advisor, and lead process/project engineer on over 20 membrane technology projects that span diverse expertise including pilot, demonstration, and full-scale testing; predesign and design; process engineering; applied research; and planning and feasibility investigations. He has served as principal investigator and project manager on two AwwaRF projects on concentrate management and desalination/membrane technology. He has served on numerous professional committees and organizations focused on membrane technology that influence technology development, technical standards, and future regulations. He received his B.E. in civil engineering from Birla Institute of Technology and Science in Pilani, India, and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in environmental science and engineering from Rice University in Houston, Texas. John Tonner is a senior consultant at Water Consultants International. He has over 18 years of experience in the design, engineering, and operations of both thermal and membrane desalination processes. Mr. Tonner has expertise in the technical basis of commercially viable desalination processes with experience from four continents and almost 50 countries and some of the world’s largest and most technically advanced seawater desalination projects. He is a member of the board of directors of the International Desalination Association. He received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Paisley, Scotland. Henry J. Vaux, Jr., is professor emeritus of resource economics at both the University of California, Berkley and Riverside. He is also associate vice president emeritus of the University of California system. He also previously served as director of California's Center for Water Resources. His principal research interests are the economics of water use, water quality, and water marketing. Prior to joining the University of California, he worked at the Office of Management and Budget and served on the staff of the National Water Commission. Dr. Vaux has served on the NRC committees on assessment of water resources research, western water management, and groundwater recharge, and, currently, sustainable underground storage of recoverable water. He was chair of the Water Science and Technology Board from 1994 to 2001. He received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan.

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Appendix F 297 Judith S. Weis is a professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Rutgers University. Her research has focused on estuarine ecology and ecotoxicology, mainly on stresses in the estuarine environment and their effects on organisms, populations, and communities. Particular areas of interest have been the effects of metal contaminants on growth, development, and behavior; development of tolerance to contaminants in populations living in contaminated areas; and effects of invasive marsh plant species on estuarine ecology, and on fate of metal contaminants. Much of her research has been focused on estuaries in the New York/New Jersey Harbor area. Dr. Weis served as an AAAS/American Society of Zoologists Congressional Science Fellow with the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, and she was a Program Director at the National Science Foundation. She has been a member of the Marine Board of the NRC, and currently serves on the National Sea Grant Review Panel of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. She received her bachelor’s degree from Cornell University and her M.S. and Ph.D. from New York University. Warren Wood is the John Hannah Professor of Integrative Studies at the Department of Geological Science, Michigan State University. His research interests include groundwater and geomorphology of arid lands, hydrogeology, and groundwater geochemistry. Prior to joining the faculty of Michigan State University, he was as a research hydrologist at the U.S. Geological Survey until his retirement. His research experience includes the origin of salinity in the Sabkhas in the United Arab Emirates. He had also worked for many years in the High Plains area of Texas on a wide range of groundwater issues, including recharge and salinization and the origin of saline lakes. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in geology and hydrology from Michigan State University. STAFF Stephanie E. Johnson is a senior program officer with the Water Science and Technology Board. Since joining the NRC in 2002, she has served as study director for five committees, including the Review of the Desalination and Water Purification Roadmap and the Committee on Water System Security Research. She has also worked on NRC studies on contaminant source remediation, the disposal of coal combustion wastes, and Everglades restoration. Dr. Johnson received her B.A. from

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298 Desalination: A National Perspective Vanderbilt University in chemistry and geology, and her M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental sciences from the University of Virginia on the subject of pesticide transport and microbial bioavailability in soils. Laura J. Ehlers is a senior staff officer for the Water Science and Technology Board of the National Research Council. Since joining the NRC in 1997, she has served as study director for eleven committees, including the Committee to Review the New York City Watershed Management Strategy, the Committee on Bioavailability of Contaminants in Soils and Sediment, and the Committee on Assessment of Water Resources Research. She received her B.S. from the California Institute of Technology, majoring in biology and engineering and applied science. She earned both an M.S.E. and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering at the Johns Hopkins University. Michael J. Stoever is a senior program assistant with the Water Science and Technology Board. He has worked on a number of studies including the Review of the Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration (LACPR) Program, the Water Implications of Biofuels Production in the United States, and the Review of the Water and Environmental Research Systems (WATERS) Network. Mr. Stoever received a B.A. in political science from The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey in Pomona, New Jersey. He joined the NRC in 2006.