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Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members PRANK W. SCHWARTZ received a Ph.D. in geology in 1972 from the University of Illinois. He is currently a professor at the Ohio State University; until very recently he was at the University of Alberta. In addition to his research and teaching, he has been an active consultant to government and private industry since 1972. Most of this work has involved project management, report review, technical advice, the development and application of computer models, and field investigations. CHARLES B. ANDREWS received a Ph.D. in geology in 1978 from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Since 1984 he has been vice president, corporate once, at S. S. Papadopulos & Associates, Inc., where he directs projects involving all aspects of quantitative ground water hydrology. Areas of expertise include the formulation of ground water projects, modification and development of new off-the-shelf numerical simulation models for adaptation to specific field projects, and evaluation of contaminant and energy transport in ground water systems. Current interests lie in developing techniques for quantify- ing the risk associated with a given level of contamination in ground water when only limited data are available. Previously, he served with Woodward-Clyde Consultants, Wainut Creek, California, as senior project hydrogeologist. 285

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286 GROUND WATER MODELS DAVID [. FREYBERG received a Ph.D. in hydrology, hydraulics, and hydromechanics from Stanford University in 1981. Currently, he is associate professor of civil engineering at Stanford. His research and teaching focus on geologic variability and the quantification and control of uncertainty in ground water transport prediction. Prior to 1980 he was a project engineer and project manager, water resources management department, Anderson-Nichols and Co., Inc., Boston. Since 1985 he has been recognized as a Presidential Young Investigator. Dr. Ereyberg is also a member of the Water Science and Technology Board committee currently evaluating the proposed National Water Quality Assessment Pilot Program. CHARLES T. KINCAID, a senior research engineer in the hydrology section of Battelle's Geosciences Department, received a Ph.D. in engineering in 1979 from Utah State University. He is currently the acting section manager for hydrology and the group leader for soil physics at Battelle, responsible for professional staff who are studying mathematical models of physical processes and chemical reactions, analytic e] and numerical code developments, and site- specific applications of models/codes. He has specialized in the area of computational fluid mechanics and has experience in both finite- difference and finite-element numerical methods and their application to surface and subsurface flows. LEONARD F. KON~OW received a B.A. in geology in 1966 from Hofstra University. His graduate studies were at Pennsylvania State University, where he received an M.S. and a Ph.D. in geology in 1969 and 1973, respectively. He has worked for the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey since 1972 and currently is a research hydrologist in their Reston, Virginia, office. He was selected by the Hydrogeology Division of the Geological Society of America to be the Birdsall Distinguished Lecturer for 1985-1986. His work focuses on the development, documentation, and application of solute transport modem for ground water contamination problems. CHESTER R. McKEE is president of In-Situ, Inc., a consulting firm in Laramie, Wyoming. He received a B.S. in physics from Duquesne University and a Ph.D. in hydrology from the New Mexico Insti- tute of Mining and Technology. Prior to forming In-Situ in 1975, he worked at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory on energy-related

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RESEARCH NEEDS 287 subsurface hydraulic problems. For the past 12 years, McKee's con- sulting experience has included hydrologic evaluations and environ- mental licensing related largely to mining projects. He has published about 20 articles on hydrodynamics, explosive fracturing, subsidence, hydrology, and restoration of ground water. DENNIS B. McIAUGHI~ received a Ph.D. in 1985 from Princeton University. His current research interests include the effects of spa- tial variability and data variability on the accuracy of ground water models. He is associate professor of civil engineering at the Ralph M. Parsons Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, having previous experience at the University of California, Davis, as lecturer, and as principal, Resources Management Associates, Lafayette, Cal- ifornia. His principal fields of interest are hydrology and water re sources systems. JAMES W. MERCER received a Ph.D. in geology in 1973 from the University of Illinois. He is president and hydrogeologist, Geo- lians, Inc., specializing in all phases of geohydrologic transport analysis, including ground water flow, and heat and solute transport in porous media for a wide range of applications. Previously he was hydrologist, U.S. GeologicalSurvey, Water Resources Division, Re- ston, Virginia. He has served on a National Research Council pane} on ground water contamination, on an advisory pane! on national ground water contamination for the Office of Technology Assessment, and on a ground water research subcommittee of the Environmental Protection Agency's Science Advisory Board. He is a member of the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board. ELLEN ]. QUINN received an M.S. in management in 1986 from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Since 1982 she has served as sci- entist, Northeast Utilities Service Company, Hartford, Connecticut, where she designs projects to investigate conditions at hazardous waste sites; evaluates chemical data and water flow information to determine the extent of contamination and recommend reme- dial measures; and negotiates with regulatory agencies to obtain required permits and approval of site studies. She has developed computer modeling capability for analysis of ground water flow and chemical transport to determine compliance with state and federal regulations. Previously she was a consultant at Sandia National Lab- oratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Prior to that she was project

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288 GROUND WATER MODELS manager, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Division of Waste Management, Washington, D.C. Pe SURESH CHANDRA RAO received a Ph.D. in soil physics in 1974 from the University of Hawaii. Currently, he is professor of soil physics at the University of Florida. HO research interests are in the development and field testing of proce - -level models for pre- dicting the environmental fate of pollutants. He is also currently working with state regulatory agencies in Florida on evaluating com- puter models that can be used to forecast potential ground water contamination from pesticide use. Professor Rao is also a member of the Water Science and Technology Board of the National Research Council. BRUCE :E. RTTTMANN is professor of environmental engineering in the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He received a Ph.D. from Stanford Univer- sity. His expertise lies in biological approaches to water treatment, including contaminated ground water and aquifers. His research has emphasized the biodegradation of trace concentrations of organic compounds and biofiIm kinetics. DONALD D. RUNNELLS received a Ph.D. in geology from Harvard University in 1964. Currently, he serves as professor of geological sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder. His research has been in geochemistry of natural waters, low-temperature geochem- istry, water pollution, geochemical exploration, and geochemistry of trace substances. He has served previously as geochemist, Shell De- velopment Company, Texas and Florida, and assistant professor of geology, University of California, Santa Barbara. PAUL K. M. Ran der HEDDE received an M.S. at the Technical University at Delft, Netherlands. Currently, he is director of the Wa- ter Science Program, International Ground Water Modeling Center, HoIcomb Research Institute, Butler University, Indiana. His research has centered on application of ground water hydrology, advancing the use of quality-assured modeling methodologies in the management of ground water resources, and development of the technology transfer methods in ground water science. He is a member of the Amer- ican Geophysical Union and the Royal Institute of Engineers, the Netherlands.

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RESEARCH NEEDS 289 WIGWAM I. WALSH received a B.S. in physics from Manhattan College and J.D. from George Washington University, Washington, D.C., in 1978. Since August 1986, he has practiced environmental law at Pepper, Hamilton & Scheetz, where he is a partner. Previ- ously, he served as lead attorney for the Environmental Protection Agency in the Above Canal" and related litigation involving four large hazardous waste landfills in the Niagara Fans, New York area. He is directly familiar with many of the legal and technical issues arising when an attempt is made to utilize contaminant models in regulatory proceedings. He is a member of the New York Academy of Sciences and the American Geophysical Union.

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