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Biographical Information Federal Sustainability R&D Forum Speakers and Panelists

RICHARD B. ALEXANDER is a Research Hydrologist with the USGS NAWQA (National Water Quality Assessment) program and has been with the USGS for 27 years. His research focuses on the development and use of water-quality modeling techniques to investigate pollutant sources and contaminant transport processes in surface waters. He is a co-developer of the USGS SPARROW water-quality model. His studies include assessments of nutrient sources and processes in streams of the Mississippi River Basin and their influence on nutrient delivery to the Gulf of Mexico. He has also developed models of nutrients and pathogens in the surface waters of New Zealand as a visiting scientist with the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research. He is a coordinator and instructor for USGS technical courses on statistical methods and water-quality modeling and the Associate Editor for water-quality modeling for the Journal of the American Water Resources Association. His educational background includes a M.S. in Water Resources Administration from the University of Arizona and a B.A. from the University of North Carolina-Charlotte.


JACQUES BEAUDRY-LOSIQUE serves as the Program Manager of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Office of Biomass Program. The Office leads federal efforts to develop technologies that will enable clean biofuels from abundant domestic resources to significantly reduce U.S. dependence on oil. Mr. Beaudry-Losique initially joined the Department as Manager of the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) in June 2005, serving in that capacity until reappointed to the Office of Biomass Program (OBP) in December 2006. He brings to the Office extensive experience in executive management, business development and commercial negotiations. He was instrumental in modernizing ITP’s portfolio



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G Biographical Information Federal Sustainability R&D Forum Speakers and Panelists RICHARD B. ALExANDER is a Research Hydrologist with the USGS NAWQA (National Water Quality Assessment) program and has been with the USGS for 27 years. His research focuses on the development and use of water-quality modeling techniques to investigate pollutant sources and contaminant transport processes in surface waters. He is a co-developer of the USGS SPARROW water-quality model. His studies include assessments of nutrient sources and processes in streams of the Mississippi River Basin and their influence on nutrient delivery to the Gulf of Mexico. He has also developed models of nutrients and pathogens in the surface waters of New Zealand as a visiting scientist with the National Insti- tute of Water and Atmospheric Research. He is a coordinator and instructor for USGS technical courses on statistical methods and water-quality modeling and the Associate Editor for water-quality modeling for the Journal of the American Water Resources Association. His educational background includes a M.S. in Water Resources Administration from the University of Arizona and a B.A. from the University of North Carolina-Charlotte. JACQUES BEAUDRY-LOSIQUE serves as the Program Manager of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Office of Biomass Program. The Office leads federal efforts to develop technologies that will enable clean biofuels from abun- dant domestic resources to significantly reduce U.S. dependence on oil. Mr. Beaudry-Losique initially joined the Department as Manager of the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) in June 2005, serving in that capacity until reap- pointed to the Office of Biomass Program (OBP) in December 2006. He brings to the Office extensive experience in executive management, business development and commercial negotiations. He was instrumental in modernizing ITP’s portfolio 0

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0 APPENDIX G and is positioning the accelerated growth of the Biomass program toward market results. Prior to joining DOE, he served two years as a mergers and acquisitions consultant, acting CFO and board member to many small and midsize technol- ogy companies. Before that he was the business development leader of General Electric Power Systems investment activities. There, he was responsible for the placement of more than $20 million in equity investments into strategic technol- ogy companies, and oversight of more than $75 million of GE investments. Prior to that, he devised growth strategies for Aspen Technologies, a leading engineer- ing and supply chain software company. Mr. Beaudry-Losique also has many years of experience as a management consultant with McKinsey and Company. Mr. Beaudry-Losique holds a Bachelor of Science degree in chemical engineering from the University of Montreal and a Master of Science degree in Industrial En- gineering and Engineering Management from Stanford University. As a recipient of a Canadian Science Foundation Fellowship, he attended the MIT Sloan School of Management, where he received a master’s degree in management in 1992. RANDY BRUINS is an environmental scientist in the U.S. EPA’s Office of Research and Development. He received his bachelor’s (1978) and master’s (1980) degrees, both in Zoology, from Miami University and his Ph.D. (1997) in environmental science from Ohio State University. His dissertation research examined methods for reducing flooding in central China, through ecological strategies such as replacement of low-lying rice with native wetland crops. Since 1997 Randy’s EPA research has focused on methods for integrating ecological risk assessment and economic analysis. He addressed these topics in a 2005 book, Economics and Ecological Risk Assessment: Applications to Watershed Manage- ment (co-edited with Matthew Heberling) and a forthcoming (2007) volume, Valuation of Ecological Resources: Integration of Ecology and Socioeconomics in Environmental Decision Making (co-edited with Ralph Stahl, Larry Kapustka and Wayne Munns). Randy serves on the board of the U.S. Society for Ecologi- cal Economics, and he is a coauthor of EPA’s 2006 strategy for measuring the benefits of ecosystem protection (the Ecological Benefits Assessment Strategic Plan). His current position is in EPA’s National Exposure Research Laboratory, where he is leading the Future Midwestern Landscapes Study, an examination of ecosystem services in the Midwestern US with special emphasis on the implica- tions of biofuels development. STEPHEN (STEVE) CARPENTER is the Stephen Alfred Forbes Professor of Zoology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Center for Limnology. He directs the North Temperate Lakes Long-Term Ecological Research site as well as a diverse program of whole-ecosystem experiments. He is co-Editor in Chief of Ecosystems, and a member of governing boards for the Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Institute of Ecosystem Studies, and Resilience Alliance. Carpenter is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, a Fellow of

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0 APPENDIX G the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a foreign member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. He has received many awards for distinguished research. Among these are a Pew Fellowship in Conservation and Environment, the G. Evelyn Hutchinson Medal of the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, the Robert H. MacArthur Award from the Ecological Society of America, the Excellence in Ecology Prize for Limnetic Ecology, the Naumann- Thienemann medal of the International Society for Limnology, many honors from the U.W.-Madison campus, and election to the Ralf Yorque Society. The Institute for Scientific Information has recognized him as one of the world’s most highly cited researchers in Environmental Science. From 2000-2005 he served as co-chair of the Scenarios Working Group of the Millennium Ecosystem Assess- ment. He served as President of the Ecological Society of America in 2000-2001. Carpenter is an ecosystem ecologist known for his leadership of large-scale ex- periments and adaptive ecosystem management. His work has addressed trophic cascades and their effects on production and nutrient cycling, contaminant cycles, freshwater fisheries, eutrophication, nonpoint pollution, ecological economics of freshwater, and resilience of social-ecological systems. Carpenter has published 4 books and about 300 scientific papers. He received a B.A. from Amherst Col- lege (1974), M.S. from University of Wisconsin-Madison (1976), and Ph.D. from U.W. Madison (1979). From 1979-1989 he served as Assistant and then Associate Professor at the University of Notre Dame. He joined the U.W.-Madison faculty in 1989. WILLIAM CHERNICOFF is an engineer within the USDOT Research and Special Programs Administration He specializes in alternative fuel and clean / advanced vehicle propulsion technology and sustainable transportation, and is a lead specialist for DOT’s hydrogen engineering activities. His primary focus is on vehicle and infrastructure safety and operations through the development and implementation of codes, standards, and best practices for vehicles and in- frastructure. Additionally, he leads efforts for development and deployment of several advanced propulsion vehicles and infrastructure. As part of the USDOT work efforts focus on ensuring the operational safety, security, and reliability of the transportation system, and maintaining the public confidence in deployed technologies. Mr. Chernicoff is an active participant on several codes and stan- dards committees for hydrogen, natural gas, and alternative fuels. He is a mem- ber of the USDOT Hydrogen Working Group and chairs the safety, codes and standards action team. He holds a BS in Materials Engineering from MIT, an MS in manufacturing engineering from Boston University, and is pursuing a PhD in Mechanical Engineering at Tufts University. NED “CHIP” EULISS JR. obtained his M.S. from Humboldt State University in California and his Ph.D. from Oregon State University. Dr. Euliss has served as a Research Wildlife Biologist with the US Geological Survey’s Northern Prairie

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0 APPENDIX G Wildlife Research Center in Jamestown, North Dakota since 1986. Dr. Euliss has led long-term research and monitoring of the dynamics in hydrology, chemistry, and biology of a prairie wetland complex at the Cottonwood Lake Study Area near Jamestown. Dr. Euliss has been instrumental in leading research on carbon sequestration, and ecosystem goods and services provided by glacial prairie wet- lands. Currently, Dr. Euliss is the interdisciplinary team lead for the Integrated Landscape Monitoring—Prairie Pilot. This project aims to quantify, monitor, and model ecosystem goods and services across the Prairie Pothole Region of the U.S. across space and time. Dr. Euliss also serves on the Department of the Interior’s task force on Climate Change. Dr. Euliss is professionally affiliated with the Society of Wetland Scientists, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, The Wildlife Society, and the North American Benthological Society. JIM FISCHER is the Senior Energy Advisor in the Research, Education, and Economics Directorate at the U.S. Department of Agriculture. He holds a Ph.D. in agricultural engineering from the University of Missouri-Columbia. As a USDA research engineer in the 1970s, he published the design specifications for the original integrated on-farm energy system. Dr. Fischer has served at three uni- versities (holding Professorial and Dean positions) — Missouri, Michigan State, and Clemson. He has provided leadership for numerous national organizations as well as led national programs envisioning the future of state and land-grant universities. His leadership in these organizations and programs has resulted in responsive research and outreach programs and relevant curricula at universities that address the critical issues impacting society today, such as agriculture, food, environment and energy. He has published more than 100 papers, contributed book chapters, testified before Congress, and served on peer review panels and advisory boards. In June 2003, he was appointed to the Board of Directors for the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy programs of the U.S. Department of Energy. As the Senior Technical Advisor (Academe) he developed innovative partnerships and models of collaboration with universities, especially land grant universities, US Department of Agriculture, foundations and the agricultural, industrial and business communities. In January 2007, he and his wife, Sharon, formed James R. Fischer and Associates; a company focused on technology and management issues at the intersection of agriculture and energy. Presently, this company is developing energy science and education programs for the U S Department of Agriculture and is also working with US Department of Energy in developing partnership with Land Grant Universities’ for energy outreach and education programs. IRIS GOODMAN is an environmental scientist in the US EPA’s Office of Re- search and Development. She received her bachelor’s (1980) from the Univer- sity of Maryland, in Conservation and Resource Management, with a minor in Economics. She received her master’s degree from the University of Wisconsin-

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 APPENDIX G Madison (1987), in Water Resources Management. She served for three years as a science analyst for the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment, and two years staffing environmental committees of the Wisconsin state legislature. During her career at EPA, she has written federal rules to protect groundwater; worked as a Principal Investigator at the National Exposure Research Laboratory on issues related to hydrology and landscape ecology at regional scales; worked as a visiting scientist for the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project, a $40 million study on adaptive management led by USDA’s Forest Ser- vice and DOI’s Bureau of Land Management; served as a Regional Scientist in EPA’s Region 10, Seattle; and managed the ecology extramural grants program for ORD’s National Center for Environmental Research. Currently, Iris is acting Deputy to Rick Linthurst, EPA’s National Program Director for Ecology. She also co-chairs, with Robert Doudrick, the Ecosystem Services Workgroup, convened under OSTP’s Subcommittee on Ecological Systems. DANIEL M. KAMMEN is the Class of 1935 Distinguished Professor of Energy at the University of California, Berkeley, where he holds appointments in the En- ergy and Resources Group, the Goldman School of Public Policy, and the depart- ment of Nuclear Engineering. Kammen is the founding director of the Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory (RAEL). Kammen is also the Co-Director of the Berkeley Institute of the Environment. Kammen received his undergraduate (Cornell A., B. 1984) and graduate (Harvard M. A. 1986, Ph.D. 1988) training is in physics After postdoctoral work at Caltech and Harvard, Kammen was profes- sor and Chair of the Science, Technology and Environmental Policy at Princeton University in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs from 1993–1998. Through RAEL, Kammen works with faculty colleagues, post- doctoral fellows, and roughly 20 doctoral students on a wide range of science, engineering, economics and policy projects related to energy science, engineering and the environment. The focus of Kammen’s work is on the science and policy of clean, renewable energy systems, energy efficiency, the role of energy in na- tional energy policy, international climate debates, and the use and impacts of energy sources and technologies on development, particularly in Africa and Latin America. His work is interdisciplinary, and extends from theoretical studies to highly practical field projects and the design and development of specific policy initiatives and pieces of legislation. Kammen has published five books, over 200 journal articles and 30 research reports. Daniel Kammen serves on the National Advisory Board of the Union of Concerned Scientists, on the Technical Review Board of the Global Environment Facility is on the advisory board of the Union of Concerned Scientists, and in 1998 was elected a Permanent Fellow of the African Academy of Sciences. In February 2007, Kammen received the Distinguished Citizen Award from the Commonwealth Club of California. In February, 2007, Kammen received the Distinguished Citizen Award from the Commonwealth Club of California.

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 APPENDIX G DANIEL E. KUGLER is the Deputy Administrator for Natural Resources and Environment at the Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Ser- vice, U.S. Department of Agriculture, in Washington, DC. Dan is a member of the Senior Executive Service and provides leadership and administration to programs and issues in water quality and availability, soil/land and air resources; forest resources and products; global change; ecology; sustainable development; conservation; sustainable natural resource management; environmental quality; rangeland resources; and wildlife and fisheries. Dan served as a math-science teacher training Peace Corps volunteer in Afghanistan from 1971-1973. From 1976 to 1986, he was an agricultural economist with USDA Economic Research Service working on soil depletion economics and policy, and an agricultural sector assessment for the Syrian Arab Republic. Dan joined the former Coopera- tive State Research Service in 1986 where he became Deputy Administrator for Special Programs, leading and administering programs in agricultural industrial materials, aquaculture, small scale agriculture, and sustainable agriculture. From 1995 to 1999, Dan was Section Leader for Processing, Engineering, and Tech- nology in the Plant and Animal Systems unit of CSREES, where he provided leadership for agricultural engineering, small farms, biobased products, food safety and science, and farm safety. From 1999 to 2002, he was Deputy Admin- istrator for Economic and Community Systems, providing leadership for place- based rural and community prosperity and development, sustainable agriculture, urban agriculture, diversity, financial security, risk management education, small farms, digital access and literacy, and entrepreneurialism. Dan has a B.S. in Phys- ics, M.S. in Resource Development, and Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from Michigan State University. MARCIA PATTON-MALLORY currently works in the office of the Chief, USDA Forest Service, as the Biomass and Bioenergy Coordinator. Previous to this assignment, she was the Director of the Rocky Mountain Research Station of the USDA Forest Service, in Fort Collins, CO for five years, and Assistant Sta- tion Director for 10 years. Additional assignments with the USDA Forest Service include a Research Staff Specialists in the Washington Office and a Research Engineer at the Forest Products Laboratory in Madison, WI. Marcia’s techni- cal training includes a B.S. in Wood Science and Technology from the College of Forestry and Natural Resources at Colorado State University, and M.S. and Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from the College of Engineering at Colorado State University. Marcia’s special assignments include a Science and Technology Fel- low, assigned to the U.S. Senate. JOHN MIzROCH is the Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary in Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy at the US Department of Energy. John joined the Department of Energy from his previous position as President and

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 APPENDIX G CEO of the World Environment Center (WEC). At the WEC, he worked to ad- vance sustainable development by encouraging environmental leadership, helping improve health and safety practices worldwide, and fostering the efficient use of natural resources to protect the global environment. Prior to leading the WEC, Mizroch promoted environmental technology transfer and investment in the de- veloping world including Latin America, Asia, and Eastern Europe. Mizroch has also been a member of the Trade and Environmental Policy Advisory Committee at the U.S. Trade Representative’s Office and also served on the Cleaner Fossil Fuel Systems Advisory Committee of the World Energy Council. Mizroch, an at- torney, has served as a Foreign Service officer in South Africa, a senior official at the U.S. Department of Commerce in the Reagan and Bush administrations, and as a senior advisor to the Joint Economic Committee of the U.S. Congress. He received undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of Virginia and a law degree from The College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy invests in a diverse portfolio of energy technologies to provide efficient, clean and renewable energy leading toward a stronger economy, a cleaner envi- ronment, and greater energy independence for America. MARK NECHODOM is a Research Social Scientist with the Pacific South- west Research Station (U.S. Forest Service), and lead scientist for the Social and Policy Sciences on the Sierra Nevada Framework Science Team. He led the socioeconomic and institutional analysis team for the Lake Tahoe Watershed Assessment (published March 2000) and is an author of the Adaptive Manage- ment Strategy for the Lake Tahoe Environmental Improvement Program. Mark has been with the Forest Service since September 1998. Mark holds a Ph.D. in political science from the University of California, Santa Cruz, with an emphasis in geography and democratic political theory. MARGARET PALMER is Professor and Director of the Chesapeake Biologi- cal Laboratory (CBL), University of Maryland Center for Environmental Sci- ence. Dr. Palmer graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Emory University in 1977, then went on to earn her Ph.D. from the University of South Carolina in coastal oceanography in 1983. Palmer’s research expertise is riverine science and coastal linkages, particularly human interactions with land and water. She has more than 100 scientific publications, serves as an editor for the journal Restoration Ecol- ogy and published the book The Foundations of Restoration Ecology in 2006. Dr. Palmer has been honored as a AAAS Fellow, an Aldo Leopold Leadership Fellow, a Lilly Fellow, a Distinguished Scholar Teacher, and with an Ecological Society of America Distinguished Service Award. Dr. Palmer serves on boards for the Chesapeake Bay Trust, American Rivers, the NSF National Center for Earth Surface Dynamics and the NSF Long Term Ecological Research program.

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 APPENDIX G STEVE PARKER is a senior staff member at the National Research Council. He is Director of the Water Science and Technology Board (since 1982). From 1990 until early in 1997, he also served concurrently as Associate Executive Director of the Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources. From 1997-2000, he served concurrently as Director of the Board on Natural Disasters. With the WSTB, Parker is responsible for study programs in a broad range of water related and natural resources topics. Subject areas include aquatic ecology and restora- tion; ground water science, technology, and management; hydrologic science; wa- ter quality and water resources management; pollution control; and other related topics. Some recent, selected publications on which he did principal NRC staff work include Hydrologic Science Priorities for the US Global Change Research Program (2000), Watershed Research in the U.S. Geological Survey (1997), Hazardous Materials in the Hydrologic Environment (1996), Mexico City’s Water Supply (1995), National Water Quality Assessment: The Challenge of National Synthesis (1994), and Opportunities in the Hydrologic Sciences (1991). Parker technical expertise lies principally in hydrologic engineering and water resources systems analysis. Prior to joining the NRC in 1982, he was in charge of river ba- sin planning studies at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (1979-1982). From 1972-1979, he was with the New England Division of the Army Corps of Engineers, where he was acting chief of hydrologic engineering; the focus of his technical work included water quality, flood and drought, and hydropower system studies. From 1970-1972, Parker was employed by Anderson-Nichols consult- ing engineers in Boston where he worked on water supply oriented projects. In 1969-1970, Parker served in the U.S. Navy in Vietnam, where he commanded a river patrol (Swift) boat. Parker was educated in hydrology and civil engineering at the University of New Hampshire (B.S.) and did graduate work in hydrology and business administration. He is a certified Professional Hydrologist, a member of the research advisory board of the National Water Research Institute, and a member of the American Institute of Hydrology and American Water Resources Association. BRUCE D. RODAN a Senior Policy Advisor-Environment in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). Dr. Rodan serves as OSTP liaison to the Ecosystems and the Toxics and Risk Subcommittees of the NSTC Committee on Environment and Natural Resources (CENR). Dr. Rodan is a medi- cal doctor (U. Melb) with Masters Degrees in Environmental Studies (U. Melb) and Public Health (Harvard). His work has included environmental risk analy- ses for toxic chemicals under the U.S. EPA Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS), negotiating the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs), and research on neotropical timber species under the CITES Treaty. SARA J. SCHERR is an agricultural and natural resource economist special- izing in land and forest management policy in tropical developing countries. She

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 APPENDIX G is Director of Ecoagriculture Partners, an international partnership to promote increased productivity jointly with enhanced natural biodiversity and ecosystem services in agricultural landscapes. She also serves as Director of Ecosystem Services for Forest Trends, an NGO that promotes forest conservation through improved markets for forest products and ecosystem services. She is a member of the United Nations Millennium Project Task Force on Hunger, and a member of the Board of Directors of the World Agroforestry Centre. Dr. Scherr’s previ- ous positions include: Adjunct Professor at the University of Maryland, College Park, USA; Co-Leader of the CGIAR Gender Program; Senior Research Fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute in Washington, D.C.; and Prin- cipal Researcher at the World Agroforestry Centre, in Nairobi, Kenya. She was previously a Fulbright Scholar (1976), and a Rockefeller Social Science Fellow (1985-1987). Dr. Scherr received her B.A. in Economics at Wellesley College in Massachusetts, and her M.Sc. and Ph.D. in International Economics and Develop- ment at Cornell University in New York. JEFFERY STEINER is the USDA Agricultural Research Service National Program Leader for Agricultural System Competitiveness and Sustainability. The research mission of this program is to develop integrated technology and informa- tion solutions that solve problems related to agricultural productivity, profitability, energy efficiency, and natural resource stewardship for different kinds and sizes of farms. Dr. Steiner joined the ARS National Program Staff in January 2006 after 17 years as a Research Agronomist at the ARS National Forage Seed Production Research Center in Corvallis, Oregon. He received his B.S. and M.S. in Plant Science from California State University-Fresno, and the Ph.D. from Oregon State University. Prior to joining ARS in 1988, he was an Associate Professor in the Plant Science Department at CSU-Fresno. Dr. Steiner is also a Fellow of the American Society of Agronomy and Crop Science Society of America, and is the 2007 recipient of the CSSA Seed Science Award. WOODY TURNER is the Program Scientist for Biological Diversity and Pro- gram Manager for Ecological Forecasting in the NASA Headquarters Science Mission Directorate. As program scientist, he oversees the agency’s basic re- search efforts to use satellite-derived information to understand the relationship of biodiversity to climate, landscape change, and ecosystem function. The NASA Ecological Forecasting Program is an applications activity seeking to bring to- gether satellite observations and ecological models to support decision making for conservation biology and sustainable regional development. Born in Nash- ville, TN, Woody graduated from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill in 1982 and earned master’s degrees in public affairs from Princeton University in 1987 and in conservation biology from the University of Maryland in 2001. He lives in Chevy Chase, Maryland, with his wife Jennifer and their two children.

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 APPENDIX G DAN WALKER is Senior Policy Analyst in the Office of Science in the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). He previously held the title of senior program officer at the Ocean Studies Board at The National Academy of Sci- ences. Since 1999, Dr. Walker has held a joint appointment as a Guest Investiga- tor at the Marine Policy Center of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He received his Ph.D. in Geology from the University of Tennessee in 1990. Dr. Walker has directed a number of NRC studies including Clean Coastal Waters: Understanding and Reducing the Effects of Nutrient Pollution (2000), Science for Decisionmaking: Coastal and Marine Geology at the U.S. Geological Survey (1999), Global Ocean Sciences: Toward an Integrated Approach (1998), and The Global Ocean Observing System: Users, Benefits, and Priorities (1997). A former member of both the Kentucky and North Carolina State geologic surveys, Dr. Walker’s interests focus on the value of environmental information for policy- making at local, state, and national levels. STEERING COMMITTEE ANN BARTUSKA became the Deputy Chief for Research & Development in January 2004. Dr. Bartuska is a nationally and internationally recognized leader in natural resource science and management. Her professional activities have been as Program Manager for the National Acid Precipitation Program at North Carolina State University (1982-1987) then for the US Forest Service (1987- 1989), Assistant Director for the US FS Southeastern Forest Experiment Station, Director of Forest Health Protection (1994-1999), Director of Forest and Range Management (1999-2001), and Executive Director, Invasive Species Initiative, The Nature Conservancy. She was elected President of the Ecological Society of America (2003) and served on the Board of the Council of Science Society Presidents. GREG CROSBY is the Agency Representative to the USDA Council for Sus- tainable Development; Governing Committee and Directors Council for the Cooperative Extension eXtension (e-Extension on-line learning) Initiative; US Government and USDA Lead for WSSD Partnership on Geographic Learning for Sustainable Development; Director of Agency One Solution (on-line reporting) Initiative; Director of Geospatial Extension Specialists NRI Program; Agency Working Group on Science for Sustainability; Co-chair of the Cooperative Ex- tension Service Workforce Development Initiative; and Senior eGovernment Fellow at the Council for Excellence in Government. His career experiences include building local alliances for science and technology education, Triangle Coalition for Science and Technology Education (NSTA) and Carnegie Corpora- tion; Curriculum writer for ChemCom: Chemistry in the Community, American Chemical Society and University of Maryland; Aerospace Education Specialist,

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 APPENDIX G NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Research Associate, National Academy of Sciences, NRC. LINDA GUNDERSEN is the Chief Scientist for Geology at the U.S. Geological Survey. She has worked as a geologist and senior manager with the USGS for over 28 years. The first half of her career focused on conducting research and directing diverse projects in the fields of geochemistry and ore deposits, ranging from understanding the origin of hard rock uranium deposits to environmental investigations of radon, uranium, and radium in rocks, soils, and water; eventu- ally assessing the geologic radon potential of the United States. This research was conducted in partnership with states, federal agencies, universities, and com- munites, and received significant grants from the Department of Energy and the Environmental Protection Agency. From 1994 to 1998 she served as Program Co- ordinator of the Energy Resources Program and the Mineral Resources Program. As a member of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Risk Assess- ment of Exposure to Radon in Drinking Water from 1997-1999, she participated in the first comprehensive overview and revamping of our understanding of this risk. In 1998, she became the Associate Chief Geologist for Operations imple- menting successful changes in the budgeting and science planning processes of the Geologic Division. During 2000 she served in the Director’s Office, working with the Director and Deputy Director in leading and implementing a major re- organization of the USGS management and science planning structure. She was appointed Chief Scientist for Geology in 2001, supervising the geologic hazard, resource, and landscape programs of the USGS. From 2005-2006 she served on detail as the Associate Director for Geology. Currently she is a champion for data interoperability across the geosciences, organizing and developing a Geo- sciences Information Network with the State Geological Surveys. Her academic background includes undergraduate and graduate work in structural geology and geochemistry at the State University of New York at Stony Brook and at the University of Colorado, Boulder. She has received the Department of Interior Superior Service and Meritorious Service Awards, the Unit of Excellence Award, and the Secretary of the Interior’s Bronze Executive Leadership award. She has published over 65 papers in the field of geology. ALAN HECHT is the Director for Sustainable Development in the U.S. Environ- mental Protection Agency’s Office of Research and Development. He served as Director for International Affairs at the National Security Council and Associate Director for Sustainable Development at the White House Council on Environ- mental Quality (2002-2003). Hecht participated in both the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio and the 2003 World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg. His most recent publication on sustainable development is in the Environmental Law Institute’s magazine The Environmental Forum (September/October 2003). Spanning a federal career of 29 years, Hecht previously served as the Principal

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 APPENDIX G Deputy and Deputy Assistant Administrator for International Activities at the U.S. EPA (1989-2001). He was the Acting Assistant Administrator for International Activities from 1992-1994. Hecht served in science and policy positions with the National Oceanographic Administration (1982-1989) and the National Sci- ence Foundation (1976-1982). He was Director of the National Climate Program from 1981 to 1989, and Director of the Climate Dynamics Program at NSF from 1976 to 1981. He has published numerous technical reports, edited two books on paleoclimatology and served as Chief Editor for journals of the American Meteorological Society. STEVE MURAWSKI serves as Director of Scientific Programs and Chief Sci- ence Advisor for NOAA Fisheries. He is responsible for about 30 laboratories, eight offshore research vessels, and 1,400 staff throughout the United States. His organization’s mission is to provide the scientific basis for conservation and management of living marine resources and their ecosystems. Dr. Murawski was previously the Director of the Office of Science and Technology, a position he held since October 2004. Prior to coming to NOAA Fisheries headquarters, he served as Chief Stock Assessment Scientist for the Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, Massachusetts (1990-2004). His research background is in fisheries biology and stock assessment. His current roles include official U.S. delegate to the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, member on the Global Ocean Ecosystems Dynamics (GLOBEC) Program Steering Com- mittee, and Project Manager for NOAA Fisheries’ Ecosystem Management Pilot Projects.