Appendix A
Biographic Information on Committee on Estimating Mortality Risk Reduction Benefits from Decreasing Tropospheric Ozone Exposure

John C. Bailar III (Chair) is professor emeritus in the Department of Health Studies at the University of Chicago and scholar-in-residence at the National Academies. He is a retired commissioned officer of the U.S. Public Health Service and worked for the National Cancer Institute for 22 years. He has also held academic appointments at Harvard University and McGill University. Dr. Bailar’s research interests include assessing health risks posed by chemical hazards and air pollutants and interpreting statistical evidence in medicine with emphasis on cancer. He was editor-in-chief of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute for 6 years and statistical consultant and member of the Editorial Board of the New England Journal of Medicine. Dr. Bailar is a member of the International Statistical Institute and was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1993. He served as chair of the National Research Council Committee on Estimating the Health-Risk-Reduction Benefits of Proposed Air Pollution Regulations. He received his MD from Yale University and his PhD in statistics from American University.


Richard T. Burnett is a senior research scientist with the Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch of Health Canada, where he has been working since 1983 on issues related to the health effects of outdoor air pollution. Dr. Burnett’s work has focused on the use of administrative health and environmental information to determine the public-health impacts of combustion-related pollution with nonlinear random-effects models and time-series and spatial analytic techniques. Dr. Burnett was a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on the Management of Air Quality in the United States and the Insti-



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Appendix A Biographic Information on Committee on Estimating Mortality Risk Reduction Benefits from Decreasing Tropospheric Ozone Exposure John C. Bailar III (Chair) is professor emeritus in the Department of Health Studies at the University of Chicago and scholar-in-residence at the National Academies. He is a retired commissioned officer of the U.S. Public Health Ser- vice and worked for the National Cancer Institute for 22 years. He has also held academic appointments at Harvard University and McGill University. Dr. Bailar’s research interests include assessing health risks posed by chemical haz- ards and air pollutants and interpreting statistical evidence in medicine with em- phasis on cancer. He was editor-in-chief of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute for 6 years and statistical consultant and member of the Editorial Board of the New England Journal of Medicine. Dr. Bailar is a member of the Interna- tional Statistical Institute and was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1993. He served as chair of the National Research Council Committee on Estimating the Health-Risk-Reduction Benefits of Proposed Air Pollution Regulations. He received his MD from Yale University and his PhD in statistics from American University. Richard T. Burnett is a senior research scientist with the Healthy Environ- ments and Consumer Safety Branch of Health Canada, where he has been work- ing since 1983 on issues related to the health effects of outdoor air pollution. Dr. Burnett’s work has focused on the use of administrative health and environ- mental information to determine the public-health impacts of combustion-related pollution with nonlinear random-effects models and time-series and spatial ana- lytic techniques. Dr. Burnett was a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on the Management of Air Quality in the United States and the Insti- 206

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207 Appendix A tute of Medicine’s Committee on Valuing Health for Regulatory Cost- Effectiveness Analysis. He is on the Editorial Board of Risk Analysis. Dr. Bur- nett is an adjunct professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine of the Faculty of Medicine, an affiliate scientist of the Institute of Population Health, and a scientist with the McLaughlin Center for Population Health Risk Assessment at the Institute of Population Health, all in the Univer- sity of Ottawa. Dr. Burnett received his PhD in mathematical statistics from Queen’s University. Lauraine G. Chestnut is a managing economist at Stratus Consulting Inc. Ms. Chestnut specializes in environmental and natural-resources economics, policy analysis, and survey research. She focuses on the quantification and economic valuation of human health, visibility, and other welfare effects of environmental pollutants. She has conducted original economic and survey research to estimate the value to the public of protecting human health, visibility aesthetics, and cul- tural materials from the effects of air pollution and has conducted epidemiologic studies of the effects of particulate matter on human health. Ms. Chestnut has synthesized the epidemiologic and economics literature on the human health effects of air pollutants and has applied this information in numerous assess- ments of the benefits of air-pollution control. She has published three books and several articles in peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of Environ- mental Management, Land Economics, the Journal of the Air Pollution Control Association, the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, and Archives of Environmental Health. Ms. Chestnut served 6 years on the Environmental Pro- tection Agency Science Advisory Board’s Advisory Council on Clean Air Com- pliance Analysis and served on California’s Air Quality Advisory Committee. She was elected to the Board of Directors of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. She received her MA in economics from the Univer- sity of Colorado. W. Michael Foster is a research professor of medicine in the Division of Pul- monary and Critical Care Medicine at Duke University Medical Center. Dr. Fos- ter’s laboratory performs research on humans and animal models and investi- gates the biologic effects of inhalational hazards (particles and gases) on airway and parenchymal lung tissues. Subjects of interest and expertise include effects of oxidant-type air pollution on lung epithelial membrane physiology, in vivo functional and biochemical tissue responses of the human and animal lung, and host (genetic) factors as modulators of the pulmonary response to ambient air pollutants, inhalable irritants, and nuisance bioaerosols. Dr. Foster received a PhD in physiology and environmental science from New York University. A. Myrick Freeman III is the William D. Shipman Professor of Economics Emeritus at Bowdoin College. During his tenure at Bowdoin, Dr. Freeman has served as chair of the Economics Department and director of the Environmental Studies Program. He also has served as the Robert M. La Follette Distinguished

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208 Ambient Ozone and Mortality: Estimating Risk-Reduction Benefits Visiting Professor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison and as a senior fel- low at Resources for the Future. His principal research interests are in applied welfare economics, benefit-cost analysis, and risk management as related to is- sues in environmental and resource management. Much of his work has been devoted to developing models and techniques for estimating the welfare effects of environmental changes (for example, the benefits of controlling pollution and the damage to natural resources due to the releases of chemicals). He has served on the National Research Council Board on Toxicology and Environmental Health Hazards. He also has served as a member of the Environmental Protec- tion Agency Advisory Council on Clean Air Compliance Analysis, Clean Air Science Advisory Committee, Environmental Economics Advisory Committee, and Science Advisory Board. He is the author of The Benefits of Environmental Improvement: Theory and Practice (1979) and The Measurement of Environ- mental and Resource Values: Theory and Methods (1993), which were cited by the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists as Publications of Enduring Value in 2003. Dr. Freeman received his PhD from the University of Washington. Montserrat Fuentes is an associate professor in the Department of Statistics at North Carolina State University (NCSU) and holds associate status in the NCSU Department of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences. Dr. Fuentes has devel- oped new statistical methods that she applies to air-pollution, weather- prediction, hurricane-forecasting, and environmental health risk-assessment problems in collaboration with the air-quality modelers and scientists at the En- vironmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research. That work has led to numerous publications in statistical journals and books and in journals in the atmospheric sciences. She received the Abdel El- Shaarawi Young Researcher’s Award in recognition of outstanding contribu- tions to environmetric research in 2003. She is a member-elect of the Interna- tional Statistical Institute and was a member of the Regional Advisory Board (Eastern North American Region) of the International Biometric Society. Dr. Fuentes is a member of the Exposure and Human Health Committee of the Envi- ronmental Protection Agency Science Advisory Board and the U.S. representa- tive in the Board of Directors of the International Environmetrics Society. She is a member of the Biostatistical Methods and Research Design study section of the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Fuentes received her PhD in statistics from the University of Chicago. Daniel S. Greenbaum is the president and chief executive officer of the Health Effects Institute, an independent not-for-profit research institute funded jointly by government and industry to provide trusted research on the health effects of air pollution. At the Health Effects Institute, Mr. Greenbaum has overseen the development and implementation of a research plan that focuses the institute’s efforts on providing critical research on and reanalysis of particulate matter, air toxics, and alternative fuels, increasingly on an international scale. In 1999, he

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209 Appendix A served as chair of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Blue Ribbon Panel on Oxygenates in Gasoline, and in 2001, as chair of the EPA Clean Diesel Independent Review Panel, which affirmed that the 2007 heavy-duty diesel rules could be met. Before joining the Health Effects Institute, he served as commis- sioner of the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection. In the National Research Council, he has served on the Board on Environmental Stud- ies and Toxicology, as vice chair of the Committee on Air Quality Management in the United States, and as a member of the Committee on Research Priorities for Airborne Particulate Matter. Mr. Greenbaum earned a master’s degree in city planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Alan Krupnick is a senior fellow and director of quality of the environment at Resources for the Future. His research focuses on analyzing environmental is- sues, in particular the benefits, costs, and design of air-pollution policies in the United States and in developing countries. His research also addresses the valua- tion of health and ecologic improvements and, more recently, the ancillary bene- fits of climate policy and urban transportation and development problems. Dr. Krupnick has served as a consultant to state governments, federal agencies, pri- vate corporations, the Canadian government, the European Union, the World Health Organization, and the World Bank. He co-chaired an advisory committee that counseled the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on new ozone and particulate-matter standards. Dr. Krupnick has participated in several National Research Council studies, including those of the Committee for the Evaluation of the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program, the Com- mittee on Research and Peer Review in EPA, and the Surface Transportation Environmental Cooperative Research Program Advisory Board. He also has served on a Royal Society of Canada committee analyzing ambient-air quality standard-setting in Canada. Dr. Krupnick received his PhD in economics from the University of Maryland. Nino Künzli is a research professor of the Center for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL) at Municipal Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain, and associate professor in leave of absence at the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine (Department of Preventive Medicine; Environmental Health Science Division), Los Angeles. His research focus is environmental epidemiology with an emphasis on air-pollution epide- miology, including exposure and risk assessment. He has completed a European assessment of the public-health impact of outdoor and traffic-related air pollu- tion. He was a member of the World Health Organization Air Pollution Health Impact Assessment Working Group. He also has served on the National Re- search Council Committee on Estimating the Health-Risk-Reduction Benefits of Proposed Air Pollution Regulations. Dr. Künzli received his MD from the Uni- versity of Basel and his MPH and PhD from the University of California, Berke- ley.

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210 Ambient Ozone and Mortality: Estimating Risk-Reduction Benefits Kent E. Pinkerton is a professor of pediatric medicine and anatomy, physiology, and cell biology at the University of California, Davis. He also serves as director of the university’s Center for Health and the Environment. His research focuses on the health effects of environmental air pollutants on lung structure and function, the interaction of gases and airborne particles in specific sites and cell populations of the lungs in acute and chronic lung injury, and the effects of environmental tobacco smoke on lung growth and development. He received a PhD in pathology from Duke University. Armistead Russell is a professor of environmental engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His research subjects include aerosol dynamics, atmos- pheric chemistry, emissions control, and air pollution-control strategy design and computer modeling. Dr. Russell has served on a number of National Re- search Council committees and was chair of the Committee to Review EPA’s Mobile Source Emissions Factor (MOBILE) Model. He received a PhD in me- chanical engineering from the California Institute of Technology. Helen Suh is an associate professor of environmental chemistry and exposure assessment at Harvard University’s School of Public Health. Her research inter- ests—air-pollutant exposures and their relationship to human health—involve the effect of exposure error, exposure modification, and confounding on epide- miology and toxicology, the contribution of indoor and outdoor sources to air- pollutant exposures, and the impact of these exposures on cardiovascular health. Her work, including research conducted at the Environmental Protection Agency Center for Ambient Particle Health Effects, has been published in numerous journals. Dr. Suh received her ScD from Harvard University’s School of Public Health. Evelyn O. Talbott is a professor in the Department of Epidemiology and a pro- fessor in the Department of Speech Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. Her major focus of research is women’s health and environmental epidemiology; her specific research interests include cardiovascular risk factors in women, environmental factors and cancer, and risk of coronary heart disease in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. She is the director of the University of Pittsburgh Academic Partner for Excellence in Environmental Public Health Tracking program, one of four academic centers in the United States that are funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and charged to assist CDC implementa- tion of a nationwide environmental public-health tracking network. She was a coinvestigator in an Allegheny County study of the relationship between air pol- lution and cardiopulmonary admissions of older people. Dr. Talbott received a PhD in epidemiology from the University of Pittsburgh.