TABLE S.1 Summary of Vision Missions (in Alphabetical Order) Evaluated by the Committee

Vision Mission

Cost Estimatea (billions)

Technical Maturityb

Worthy of Further Study as a Constellation Mission?

Notes

Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT)

$1

Medium

No

This mission does not benefit from Constellation.

Generation-X (Gen-X)

>$5

Low

Yes

One Ares V launch of one 16-meter telescope is significantly simpler than the early proposed configurations.

Cost estimates are weak. The additional mass capability could significantly reduce mirror development costs.

Interstellar Probe

$1-$5

High—concept, instruments

Low—propulsion

Yes

Further study is needed of the benefits of additional launch mass enabled by Ares V, in particular alternative propulsion options.

Kilometer-Baseline Far-Infrared/Submillimeter Interferometer

>$5

Low

No

The need for Constellation is questionable, except for human servicing.

Modern Universe Space Telescope (MUST)

>$5

High—mission concept, instruments

Low—assembly

Yes

Large one-piece, central mirror is possible with Ares V rather than a robotically assembled mirror.

Neptune Orbiter with Probes

>$5

High—mission concept, instruments

Low—propulsion and possibly lander

Yes

Ares V could possibly obviate the need for aerocapture and/or nuclear-electric propulsion.

Palmer Quest

>$5

Low

No

This mission does not benefit from Constellation.

Single Aperture Far Infrared Mission (SAFIR)

>$5

Medium—mission concept

Low—cooling, detectors

No

This mission does not benefit from Constellation.

Solar Polar Imager

$1-$5

High—mission concept, instruments

Low—propulsion

Yes

Consider propulsion options enabled by Ares V.

Stellar Imager

$5

Low

Yes

Could launch larger mirrors (2 meters vs. 1 meter) and a second hub on a single Ares V launch.

Titan Explorer

>$5

Low—requires aerocapture

Yes

Launch on Ares V may enable propulsive capture rather than aerocapture and shorten transit time.

a Cost estimates based on data provided to the committee.

b Technical maturity based on data provided to the committee.



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