• Supported cooperation with other nations in the peaceful use of outer space,

  • Considered space systems to have the rights of passage through and operations in space without interference,

  • Asserted that the U.S. will preserve its rights, capabilities, and freedom of action in space and take those actions necessary to protect its space capabilities,

  • Opposed the development of new legal regimes or other restrictions that seek to prohibit or limit U.S. access to or use of space, and

  • Committed to encouraging and facilitating a growing and entrepreneurial U.S. commercial space sector.

The policy set forth seven fundamental goals, as follows:11

  • Strengthen the nation’s space leadership and ensure that space capabilities are available in time to further U.S. national security, homeland security, and foreign policy objectives;

  • Enable unhindered U.S. operations in and through space to defend our interests there;

  • Implement and sustain an innovative human and robotic exploration program with the objective of extending human presence across the solar system;

  • Increase the benefits of civil exploration, scientific discovery, and environmental activities;

  • Enable a dynamic, globally competitive domestic commercial space sector in order to promote innovation, strengthen U.S. leadership, and protect national, homeland, and economic security;

  • Enable a robust science and technology base supporting national security, homeland security, and civil space activities; and

  • Encourage international cooperation with foreign nations and/or consortia on space activities that are of mutual benefit and that further the peaceful exploration and use of space, as well as to advance national security, homeland security, and foreign policy objectives.

In addition to providing implementation guidelines for the secretary of defense and the director of national security for the national security space program, the policy provided civil space program guidance for NASA and the Department of Commerce as follows:12

The United States shall increase the benefits of civil exploration, scientific discovery, and operational environmental monitoring activities. To that end, the Administrator, National Aeronautics and Space Administration shall: execute a sustained and affordable human and robotic program of space exploration and develop, acquire, and use civil space systems to advance fundamental scientific knowledge of our Earth system, solar system, and universe.

The Secretary of Commerce, through the Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, shall in coordination with the Administrator, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, be responsible for operational civil environmental space-based remote sensing systems and management of the associated requirements and acquisition process.

11

Office of Science and Technology Policy, U.S. National Space Policy, National Security Presidential Directive 49, unclassified version released on October 6, 2006, available at http://www.ostp.gov/galleries/defaultfile/Unclassified%20National%20Space%20Policy%20--%20FINAL.pdf, p. 2.

12

Office of Science and Technology Policy, U.S. National Space Policy, National Security Presidential Directive 49, unclassified version released on October 6, 2006, available at http://www.ostp.gov/galleries/defaultfile/Unclassified%20National%20Space%20Policy%20--%20FINAL.pdf, p. 5.



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