1. Even clinical research and medical care data developed with public funds are often not available for broader analysis and insights.

  2. Broader access and use of healthcare data for new insights requires not only fostering data system reliability and interoperability, but addressing the matter of individual data ownership and the extent to which data central to progress in health and health care should constitute a public good.

Goal: To explore these issues, identify potential approaches, and discuss possible strategies for their engagement.


DAY ONE

8:30

WELCOME AND OPENING REMARKS

J. Michael McGinnis, Institute of Medicine

8:45

CLINICAL DATA AS THE BASIC STAPLE OF THE LEARNING HEALTHCARE SYSTEM

What is the current profile of our clinical data “utility”? What might be possible if all data sources could be readily and reliably drawn upon for new insights into healthcare effectiveness? What specific key steps would foster achieving this vision?

David J. Brailer, Health Evolution Partners

9:30

SESSION 1: U.S. HEALTHCARE DATA TODAY: CURRENT STATE OF PLAY

What purposes drive the collection of healthcare data in the United States and what is the system’s current profile? How accessible are clinical data for new clinical insights, how well are they used, and what are the barriers? How might clinical data from all sources—publicly funded and privately funded—be made more useful to monitor clinical effectiveness?

Chair: Cato T. Laurencin, University of Virginia and IOM Roundtable on Value & Science-Driven Health Care

 

• Current healthcare data profile

 

Simon P. Cohn, Kaiser Permanente and National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics

 

• Data used as indicators for assessing, managing, and improving health care

 

Barbra G. Rabson, Massachusetts Health Quality Partners

 

[10:10–10:30 BREAK]



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