1. Impressive transformations have occurred through systems and process engineering in service and manufacturing sectors—e.g., banking, airline safety, automobile manufacturing.
  2. Despite the obvious differences that exist in the dynamics of mechanical vs. biological and social systems, the current challenges in health care necessitate an entirely fresh view of the organization, structure, and function of the delivery and monitoring processes in health care.
  3. Taking on the challenges in health care offers the engineering sciences an opportunity to test, learn, and refine approaches to understanding and improving innovation in complex adaptive systems.

DAY ONE

8:30 WELCOME AND INTRODUCTIONS
Denis A. Cortese, Mayo Clinic and Roundtable on
Evidence-Based Medicine (IOM)
William B. Rouse, Georgia Institute of Technology and Planning
Committee Chair (NAE)
   
8:45 KEYNOTES: 1. LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES FOR HEALTH CARE
                   2. TEACHING OPPORTUNITIES FROM ENGINEERING
Opening keynote speakers will address some of the key systemic shortfalls and challenges in health care today, reflecting on the changes needed and how systems engineering might help foster a healthcare system that delivers the care we know works and that learns from the care delivered.
Brent C. James, Intermountain Healthcare (IOM)
W. Dale Compton, Purdue University (NAE)
   
9:45 SESSION 1: ENGAGING COMPLEX SYSTEMS THROUGH ENGINEERING CONCEPTS
How do the various engineering disciplines (e.g., systems engineering, industrial engineering, operations research, human factors engineering, financial engineering, risk analysis) engage system complexity, and how might this perspective inform and improve health care? What can we learn from the contrasts?
Chair: Paul H. O’Neill, Value Capture, LLC

images   Systems engineering perspectives
William B. Rouse, Georgia Institute of Technology (NAE)

images   Engineering systems analysis tools
Richard C. Larson, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (NAE)



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