Summary

International Polar Year (IPY) 2007–2008 is an intense, coordinated field campaign of polar observations, research, and analysis. It is one of the largest collaborative science programs ever attempted, involving more than 200 projects and people from more than 60 nations. The ambitious agenda has a distinctly multidisciplinary approach, incorporating activities in the physical, biological, and social sciences and including a large education component. Themes include improving understanding of the status of the environment, the changes in the environment and social systems, the global linkages, the new frontiers in science, the polar regions as a unique vantage point, and the human dimension. This IPY follows in a long tradition of polar scientific collaboration and achievement, dating back to the first IPY 150 years ago in 1882–1883, a second IPY in 1932–1933, and the International Geophysical Year in 1957–1958.

In honor of its long-time leader, Ms. Martha Twitchell Muse, and to provide a lasting legacy of IPY, the Tinker Foundation is establishing an annual, prestigious prize: the Martha Muse IPY Prize for Science and Policy in Antarctica (abbreviated as the Martha Muse Prize). This $100,000 unrestricted prize will be awarded following a nominations process similar to that of the National Medal of Science, meaning that people are nominated by others in the community. The committee concluded that the prize should be intended for an early to mid-career researcher, in any field of Antarctic science or policy, who has demonstrated exceptional research capabilities and the potential to show significant creativity and leadership in the future. The prize winner can be from any country and work in any field of Antarctic science or policy. The goal is to provide recognition of the outstanding and important work being done by the individual and to call attention to the importance of understanding Antarctica in this time of global climate change.

This report outlines the strategy and steps necessary to take the Martha Muse Prize from concept to implementation. It describes the prize’s purpose and nature, the system that could be used to announce the prize and collect nominations, potential procedures to be used by the Selection Committee, and possible post-award activities.



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Summary International Polar Year (IPY) 2007–2008 is an intense, coordinated field campaign of polar observations, research, and analysis. It is one of the largest collaborative science programs ever attempted, involving more than 200 projects and people from more than 60 nations. The ambitious agenda has a distinctly multidisciplinary approach, incorporating activities in the physical, biological, and social sciences and including a large education component. Themes include improving understanding of the status of the environment, the changes in the environment and social systems, the global linkages, the new frontiers in science, the polar regions as a unique vantage point, and the human dimension. This IPY follows in a long tradition of polar scientific collaboration and achievement, dating back to the first IPY 150 years ago in 1882–1883, a second IPY in 1932–1933, and the International Geophysical Year in 1957– 1958. In honor of its long-time leader, Ms. Martha Twitchell Muse, and to provide a lasting legacy of IPY, the Tinker Foundation is establishing an annual, prestigious prize: the Martha Muse IPY Prize for Science and Policy in Antarctica (abbreviated as the Martha Muse Prize). This $100,000 unrestricted prize will be awarded following a nominations process similar to that of the National Medal of Science, meaning that people are nominated by others in the community. The committee concluded that the prize should be intended for an early to mid- career researcher, in any field of Antarctic science or policy, who has demonstrated exceptional research capabilities and the potential to show significant creativity and leadership in the future. The prize winner can be from any country and work in any field of Antarctic science or policy. The goal is to provide recognition of the outstanding and important work being done by the individual and to call attention to the importance of understanding Antarctica in this time of global climate change. This report outlines the strategy and steps necessary to take the Martha Muse Prize from concept to implementation. It describes the prize’s purpose and nature, the system that could be used to announce the prize and collect nominations, potential procedures to be used by the Selection Committee, and possible post-award activities. 1