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The Martha Muse Prize

VISION AND PHILOSOPHY

The Martha Muse Prize will recognize an individual who has demonstrated excellence in Antarctic science or policy and who shows clear potential for sustained major and significant contributions that will enhance the understanding of Antarctica. The Martha Muse Prize is inspired by Martha Muse’s passion for Antarctica and is intended to be a legacy of IPY. The Tinker Foundation’s goal is to establish a prestigious award that recognizes excellence in Antarctic research by honoring someone in the early to mid-stages of his or her career. (Although the committee’s statement of task specifically mentions individuals in the early stages of their career, the president of the Tinker Foundation stressed to the committee that it should use its best judgment regarding whom the prize should target. It was also conveyed that the Foundation would be open to whatever the committee recommended.) This goal is best achieved by an unrestricted prize given to an individual nominated for recognition by members of the broad Antarctic community of researchers.

CHARACTERISTICS OF A PRIZE WINNER

Nominees for the Martha Muse Prize should be capable of making a significant contribution in a field or topic that advances our understanding of Antarctic science or policy during their career. Exemplar activities in which a Martha Muse Prize winner might show promise of future leadership include—but are not limited to—the following areas:

  • Studying the agreements, instruments, and conventions mong nations that foster international cooperation, promote shared governance, and protect the environment of Antarctica.

  • Advancing cross-disciplinary efforts to better understand Antarctica.

  • Conducting investigations that advance our understanding of Antarctic systems and living resources as key components of the Earth system.

  • Studying the unique characteristics and adaptations of Antarctic organisms.

  • Defining the role of humans in change in the Antarctic environment and improving our ability to predict future outcomes, promote environmental stewardship, and inform management of the region.

  • Studying the critical linkages between Antarctica and the planet as a whole.

  • Addressing one or more of the themes embodied in IPY 2007–2008 (see Chapter 1 for details).



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2 The Martha Muse Prize VISION AND PHILOSOPHY The Martha Muse Prize will recognize an individual who has demonstrated excellence in Antarctic science or policy and who shows clear potential for sustained major and significant contributions that will enhance the understanding of Antarctica. The Martha Muse Prize is inspired by Martha Muse’s passion for Antarctica and is intended to be a legacy of IPY. The Tinker Foundation’s goal is to establish a prestigious award that recognizes excellence in Antarctic research by honoring someone in the early to mid-stages of his or her career. (Although the committee’s statement of task specifically mentions individuals in the early stages of their career, the president of the Tinker Foundation stressed to the committee that it should use its best judgment regarding whom the prize should target. It was also conveyed that the Foundation would be open to whatever the committee recommended.) This goal is best achieved by an unrestricted prize given to an individual nominated for recognition by members of the broad Antarctic community of researchers. CHARACTERISTICS OF A PRIZE WINNER Nominees for the Martha Muse Prize should be capable of making a significant contribution in a field or topic that advances our understanding of Antarctic science or policy during their career. Exemplar activities in which a Martha Muse Prize winner might show promise of future leadership include—but are not limited to—the following areas: Studying the agreements, instruments, and conventions among nations that foster international cooperation, promote shared governance, and protect the environment of Antarctica. Advancing cross-disciplinary efforts to better understand Antarctica. Conducting investigations that advance our understanding of Antarctic systems and living resources as key components of the Earth system. Studying the unique characteristics and adaptations of Antarctic organisms. Defining the role of humans in change in the Antarctic environment and improving our ability to predict future outcomes, promote environmental stewardship, and inform management of the region. Studying the critical linkages between Antarctica and the planet as a whole. Addressing one or more of the themes embodied in IPY 2007–2008 (see Chapter 1 for details). 5

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Contributing to the public understanding and appreciation of Antarctica, its value, and its role in our lives. LONG-TERM STRATEGY The committee recognized that many characteristics, attributes, and wishes for impacts cannot be realized in any single one-time award but can be accomplished by multiple awardees over a period of several years. Goals for diversity, geographic location, discipline, and topic coverage will be obtainable when a cadre of prize winners has been created over time. Therefore, it is recommended that the Selection Committee adopt a long-term vision of the desired outcomes while at the same time selecting the very best nominee each year. (See Chapter 4 for more information regarding the Selection Committee.) The attributes of past winners should be considered if all other criteria are equal. For example, an overabundance of prize winners from a single country or geographic region might suggest emphasizing candidates from other locations in subsequent years. Over a five- or ten-year period, most of the major scientific foci from Antarctic science and policy could be represented amongst the winners. This longer-term strategy allows maximization of the impact of the Martha Muse Prize on Antarctic science and policy by creating a diverse community of scholars. 6