B
Workshop Agenda

From Molecules to Minds: Challenges for the 21st Century


June 25, 2008


Lecture Room

The National Academy of Sciences Building

2101 Constitution Avenue, N.W.

Washington, DC 20418


Background:


The unifying theme for this workshop is the need to expand the understanding of how perception, cognition, and action arise in the human brain from interactions among molecules, chemicals, neurons, and circuits, the brain’s fundamental building blocks. This concept is pertinent to every level of brain organization, from understanding how molecules become assembled into neurons to how neurons get assembled into neuronal circuits, how those circuits develop unique properties and capabilities, and finally how dysfunction at any of these levels may lead to disorders of the brain.


Objectives:

  • Illuminate the progress and successes made by the neuroscience community and highlight the challenges still facing the field.



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B Workshop Agenda From Molecules to Minds: Challenges for the 21st Century June 25, 2008 Lecture Room The National Academy of Sciences Building 2101 Constitution Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20418 Background: The unifying theme for this workshop is the need to expand the understanding of how perception, cognition, and action arise in the human brain from interactions among molecules, chemicals, neurons, and circuits, the brain’s fundamental building blocks. This concept is pertinent to every level of brain organization, from understanding how molecules become assembled into neurons to how neurons get assembled into neuronal circuits, how those circuits develop unique properties and capabilities, and finally how dysfunction at any of these levels may lead to disorders of the brain. Objectives: • Illuminate the progress and successes made by the neuroscience community and highlight the challenges still facing the field. 33

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34 FROM MOLECULES TO MINDS • Identify the guiding principles, fundamental scientific questions, and goals that will inspire the scientific and public communities to support and engage this grand challenge. • Identify the infrastructure and resource requirements that will be necessary to advance and accelerate discovery, including: What will be the technology needs? o Which disciplines will need to be engaged and what will be o their training requirements? What partnerships need to be forged? o 9:00 a.m. Welcome, Introductions, and Workshop Objectives ALAN LESHNER, Forum Chair Executive Publisher Science Magazine Chief Executive Officer American Association for the Advancement of Science 9:15 a.m. Overview and Objectives of the IOM Neuroscience Forum’s Grand Challenges Initiative KATHIE OLSEN Deputy Director National Science Foundation 9:30 a.m. From Molecules to Minds: Opportunities and Challenges COLIN BLAKEMORE Chief Executive Officer (former) British Medical Research Council Professor Department of Physiology, Anatomy, and Genetics Oxford University

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35 APPENDIX B SESSION I: OVERVIEW OF CURRENT KNOWLEDGE: EXAMINING THE CURRENT THEORIES OF HOW THE NERVOUS SYSTEM IS ORGANIZED FROM MOLECULES TO MINDS Session Objective: Highlight and discuss the current understanding, hypotheses, and theories for how the nervous system is organized, and how molecular and cellular organization impacts the function of the brain. Based on the current understanding, what are the future needs for the neuroscience community? 9:50 a.m. Introduction to the Session: Session Objectives STORY LANDIS, Session Chair Director National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke 10:00 a.m. Principles of Neuronal Coding WILLIAM BIALEK John Archibald Wheeler/Battelle Professor in Physics Joseph Henry Laboratories of Physics Lewis–Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics Princeton University 10:15 a.m. Circuits: Between Systems and Cellular Processes EVE MARDER Professor of Neuroscience Department of Biology and Volen Center Brandeis University 10:30 a.m. BREAK

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36 FROM MOLECULES TO MINDS 10:45 a.m. Cognitive Disorders: Molecules, Cells, and Circuits ALCINO SILVA Director Behavioral Testing Core Professor, Psychology Tennenbaum Center for the Biology of Creativity, Neurobiology UCLA School of Medicine 11:00 a.m. Research and Neuroethics JONATHAN MORENO David and Lyn Silfen University Professor Center for Bioethics University of Pennsylvania Health System 11:15 a.m. Discussion STORY LANDIS, Session Chair Director National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Noon LUNCH SESSION II: EXPLORING THE GRAND CHALLENGES Session Objective: Highlight and discuss cross-cutting themes and knowledge gaps, and how these may help to identify a set of guiding principles and fundamental scientific questions. • What the field knows it does not know; • What it doesn’t know it doesn’t know; and • What it thinks it knows but doesn’t.

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37 APPENDIX B 1:00 p.m. Introduction to the Session: Session Objectives STEVEN HYMAN, Session Chair Provost Harvard University 1:15 p.m. Panel Discussion 1: What are the current challenges and opportunities? Machine Learning and Its Implications on Understanding the Brain TOM MITCHELL Fredkin Professor of AI and Machine Learning Chair Machine Learning Department School of Computer Science Carnegie Mellon University Neurophysiologic and Modeling Strategies to Understand the Brain THEODORE BERGER David Packard Professor of Engineering, Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Neurobiology Director Center for Neural Engineering University of Southern California Computational Neuroscience: What Lies Ahead? READ MONTAGUE Professor Department of Neuroscience Human Neuroimaging Lab Baylor College of Medicine

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38 FROM MOLECULES TO MINDS 2:00 p.m. Panel Discussion 2: What are the current challenges and opportunities? Understanding Neuronal Connections Using Imaging Strategies JEFF LICHTMAN Professor Molecular and Cellular Biology Harvard University Multimodal Neuroimaging of Brain Activity and Connectivity BIN HE Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Neuroscience Interim Director, Center for Neuroengineering University of Minnesota Molecular Neurobiology and Genetics of Circadian Clocks JOSEPH S. TAKAHASHI Investigator Howard Hughes Medical Institute Walter and Mary E. Glass Professor in the Life Sciences Department of Neurobiology and Physiology Northwestern University Pruning the Brain Through Changes in Activity MICHAEL GREENBERG Chair Department of Neurobiology Harvard Medical School 3:00 p.m. BREAK

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39 APPENDIX B 3:15 p.m. Panel Discussion 3: What are the current challenges and opportunities? Neurochemistry and the Brain JOSEPH COYLE Eben S. Draper Professor of Psychiatry and of Neuroscience Harvard Medical School The Aging Mind: Structural and Neurochemical Changes STEVEN T. DEKOSKY Professor and Chair Department of Neurology University of Pittsburgh SESSION III: NEXT STEPS: ENERGIZING THE COMMUNITY Session Objective: What “grand challenges” were identified during the workshop that will inspire the scientific and public communities to support and engage this initiative? Identify and discuss current and future technological and resource needs that will be necessary to overcome associated challenges and advance and accelerate discovery. How can we, and who should, champion the innovation and ideas discussed during the workshop? 4:15 p.m. Panel Discussion with Key Stakeholders: Opportunities, Priorities, and Resources Requirements Identified During the Workshop TIMOTHY COETZEE Vice President, Discovery Partnerships National Multiple Sclerosis Society

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40 FROM MOLECULES TO MINDS EVE MARDER Professor of Neuroscience Department of Biology and Volen Center Brandeis University STEVEN HYMAN Provost Harvard University TOM INSEL Director National Institute of Mental Health ALAN LESHNER Executive Publisher Science Magazine Chief Executive Officer American Association for the Advancement of Science TING-KAI LI Director National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism NORA VOLKOW Director National Institute on Drug Abuse 5:00 p.m. Closing Remarks KATHIE OLSEN Deputy Director National Science Foundation 5:15 p.m. ADJOURN