D
Biographical Sketches of Invited Speakers, Planning Committee Members, Forum Members, and Staff

INVITED SPEAKERS

Alan I. Leshner, Ph.D. (Forum Chair), is chief executive officer of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and executive publisher of its journal, Science. Previously Dr. Leshner had been director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and deputy director and acting director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Before that, he held a variety of senior positions at the National Science Foundation (NSF). Dr. Leshner began his career at Bucknell University, where he was a professor of psychology. Dr. Leshner is an elected member (and on the governing council) of the Institute of Medicine (IOM), and a Fellow of AAAS, the National Academy of Public Administration, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was appointed by the U.S. President to the National Science Board, and is a member of the Advisory Committee to the Director of NIH. He received an A.B. in Psychology from Franklin and Marshall College and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in physiological psychology from Rutgers University. Dr. Leshner has been awarded six honorary Doctor of Science degrees.


Theodore Berger, Ph.D., is the David Packard Professor of Engineering and Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Neuroscience, and director, Center for Neural Engineering (CNE) at the University of Southern California. Dr. Berger received his Ph.D. in Physiological Psychology from Harvard University in 1976, and continued postdoctoral training in the Psychobiology Department at the University of California, Irvine, and at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. His current research focuses on developing biologically based mathematical models of the func-



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D Biographical Sketches of Invited Speakers, Planning Committee Members, Forum Members, and Staff INVITED SPEAKERS Alan I. Leshner, Ph.D. (Forum Chair), is chief executive officer of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and ex- ecutive publisher of its journal, Science. Previously Dr. Leshner had been director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and deputy director and acting director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Before that, he held a vari- ety of senior positions at the National Science Foundation (NSF). Dr. Leshner began his career at Bucknell University, where he was a profes- sor of psychology. Dr. Leshner is an elected member (and on the govern- ing council) of the Institute of Medicine (IOM), and a Fellow of AAAS, the National Academy of Public Administration, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was appointed by the U.S. President to the National Science Board, and is a member of the Advisory Com- mittee to the Director of NIH. He received an A.B. in Psychology from Franklin and Marshall College and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in physiological psychology from Rutgers University. Dr. Leshner has been awarded six honorary Doctor of Science degrees. Theodore Berger, Ph.D., is the David Packard Professor of Engineering and Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Neuroscience, and direc- tor, Center for Neural Engineering (CNE) at the University of Southern California. Dr. Berger received his Ph.D. in Physiological Psychology from Harvard University in 1976, and continued postdoctoral training in the Psychobiology Department at the University of California, Irvine, and at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. His current research fo- cuses on developing biologically based mathematical models of the func- 45

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46 FROM MOLECULES TO MINDS tional properties of the hippocampus by combining experimental studies of fundamental electrophysiological properties of hippocampal neurons and theoretical studies based on nonlinear systems and compartmental analyses, and experimental studies of cellular/molecular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity and the effects of such plasticity on functional dynam- ics of the hippocampus at the network and systems level. Through col- laborations with other CNE faculty, Dr. Berger’s research extends to developing analog VLSI implementations of experimentally based mod- els of hippocampal neurons and neural networks, both for basic research and applications, and developing “neuron–silicon interface” technology using silicon-based, multisite electrode arrays and tissue culture methods for implantation of hardware models into the brain to replace damaged or dysfunctional nerve tissue. William Bialek, Ph.D., is the John Archibald Wheeler/Battelle Professor in Physics at Princeton University. He is also an associated faculty mem- ber in the Department of Molecular Biology, and a member of the mul- tidisciplinary Lewis–Sigler Institute. Professor Bialek participates in the interdepartmental educational programs in Applied and Computational Mathematics, Biophysics, Neuroscience, and Quantitative and Computa- tional Biology. Dr. Bialek attended the University of California, Berke- ley, receiving the A.B. (1979) and Ph.D. (1983) degrees in Biophysics. After postdoctoral appointments at the Rijksuniversiteit Groningen in the Netherlands and at the Institute for Theoretical Physics in Santa Barbara, he returned to Berkeley to join the faculty in 1986. He joined the Prince- ton faculty as a professor of physics in 2001. Professor Bialek’s research interests have covered a wide variety of theoretical problems at the inter- face of physics and biology, from the dynamics of individual biological molecules to learning and cognition. Best known for contributions to our understanding of coding and computation in the brain, Dr. Bialek and collaborators have shown that aspects of brain function can be described as essentially optimal strategies for adapting to the complex dynamics of the world, making the most of the available signals in the face of funda- mental physical constraints and limitations. Colin Blakemore, Ph.D., studied Medical Sciences in Cambridge Uni- versity from 1962 to 1965 and completed a Ph.D. in Physiological Optics as a Harkness Fellow at the University of California in 1968. Since 2003 he has been on leave while holding the post of chief executive of the British Medical Research Council. He has maintained research activity at

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47 APPENDIX D Oxford and since October 2007 he has held the title of professor of neu- roscience. Dr. Blakemore is a fellow of the Royal Society and the Acad- emy of Medical Sciences, is an Honorary FRCP and holds honorary fellowships from the Institute of Biology and the British Association for the Advancement of Science. He is a foreign member of the Royal Neth- erlands Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has been president of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, the British Neuro- science Association, the Physiological Society, and the Biosciences Fed- eration. Dr. Blakemore’s research has been concerned with many aspects of vision, early development of the brain, and plasticity of the cerebral cortex. His current interests are in two areas. First, together with Dr. Irina Bystron, he is studying the earliest stages of formation of the cerebral cortex in human embryos, using immunocytochemical methods and techniques for tracing the outgrowth of axons to examine the prolifera- tion of neural stem cells; the production, migration, and differentiation of cortical neurons; as well the formation of connections into and out of the developing cortex. One aim of this research is to define the developmen- tal errors that underlie cognitive disorders, such as autism, dyslexia, and schizophrenia. His second area of current research, together with Drs. Kai Thilo and Meng Liang, uses techniques for imaging activity in the living adult human brain to examine the capacity of sensory areas of the cortex to reorganize their activity during selective attention, during the integration of information from different sensory systems, and after the onset of blindness. Timothy Coetzee, Ph.D., is the executive director of Fast Forward, LLC, a venture philanthropy of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. He is responsible for the Society’s strategic funding of biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies as well as partnerships with the financial and business communities. Prior to assuming his current position, Dr. Coetzee led the Society’s translational research initiatives on nervous system repair and protection in multiple sclerosis (MS) as well as the Society’s programs to recruit and train physicians and scientists in MS research. Dr. Coetzee received his Ph.D. in Molecular Biology from Al- bany Medical College in 1993 and has since been involved in MS re- search. He was a research fellow in the laboratory of Society grantee Dr. Brian Popko at the University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, where he received an Advanced Postdoctoral Fellowship Award from the Society. After completing his training with Dr. Popko, Dr. Coetzee joined the faculty of the Department of Neuroscience at the University of Connecti-

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48 FROM MOLECULES TO MINDS cut School of Medicine, where he conducted research that applied new technologies to understand how myelin is formed in the nervous system. He is the author of a number of research publications on the structure and function of myelin. Dr. Coetzee joined the National MS Society’s Home Office staff in fall 2000. Joseph Coyle, M.D., holds the Eben S. Draper Chair of Psychiatry and Neuroscience at Harvard Medical School. From 1991 to 2001, he served as chairman of the Consolidated Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, which included the nine hospital programs of psychiatry affiliated with the Medical School. After graduating from Holy Cross College, he received his M.D. from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in 1969. Following an internship in Pediatrics, he spent 3 years at NIH as a research fellow in the laboratory of Nobel laureate Julius Axelrod, Ph.D. He returned to Hopkins in 1973 to complete his residency in psy- chiatrics, in which he is board certified, and joined the faculty in 1975. In 1980, he was promoted to professor of Neuroscience, Pharmacology, and Psychiatry; in 1982 he assumed the directorship of the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, being named the Distinguished Service Professor in 1985. Dr. Coyle’s research interests include developmental neurobiology, mechanisms of neuronal vulnerability, and psychopharma- cology. In particular, he has carried out research on the role of glutama- tergic neurons in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders for 30 years. He has a long commitment to training. In the mid-1980s, he was the principal investigator (PI) of a NIMH Training Grant that had a core curriculum, which introduced Ph.D. fellows to psychiatric illnesses with patient demonstrations. While president of the Society of Neurosci- ence, he worked with NIMH to develop a minority training grant. For the past 10 years, he has served as co-PI on this grant, which was the founda- tion for minority mentoring and networking for the Society. He has pub- lished more than 500 scientific articles and has edited seven books. His research has been cited more than 35,000 times, and his H-factor is 93. He has received continuous NIH funding for his research for 30 years and is the director of an NIMH Conte Center on the Neurobiology of Schizophrenia (2001–2011). Dr. Coyle is a member of the IOM (1990), a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1993), a Distin- guished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, a Fellow of the American College of Psychiatry, and a Fellow of AAAS. He served on the National Advisory Mental Health Council for NIMH from 1990 to 1994. He is past president of the American College of Neuropsycho-

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49 APPENDIX D pharmacology (2001) and past president (1991) of the Society for Neuro- science, which has more than 35,000 members. He sits on more than 20 journal editorial boards, including JAMA, and is editor-in-chief of the Archives of General Psychiatry, the most highly cited journal in the field (citation impact: 13.9). Steven DeKosky, M.D., is professor and chair of the Department of Neurology and director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at the University of Pittsburgh. His clinical research includes differential diagnosis, neuroimaging, and genetic risks for Alzheimer’s disease and trials of new medications. His basic research centers on structural and neurochemical changes in human brains in normal aging and dementia. He is director of a national multicenter trial to assess whether Ginkgo biloba can delay onset of dementia in normal elderly adults. In 2004 he was appointed to the Peripheral and Central Nervous System Advisory Committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Dr. DeKosky was a member of the national board of directors of the Alzheimer’s As- sociation for 8 years, the last 4 as vice chair. He was the chair of the Alz- heimer’s Association Medical and Scientific Advisory Council from 1997 to 2002. He also chairs the Professional Advisory Board of the Greater Pittsburgh Chapter and was a founding member of the Lexing- ton–Blue Grass Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association. In 2002 he was elected chair of the Medical and Scientific Advisory Panel of Alz- heimer’s Disease International, the international organization of national Alzheimer’s associations. Dr. DeKosky has served as chair of the Section on Geriatrics of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN). He chaired the recent AAN Practice Parameters Committee for Early Detec- tion, Diagnosis, and Management of Dementia. He has been an examiner in neurology for the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN) for more than 15 years and served as a member of the ABPN Part I (Written) Examination Committee for 10 years. In 2002 he was elected to the Neurology Council of the ABPN; he is one of the eight neurologists who oversee board certification in the country. He has re- ceived a Teacher Investigator Development Award from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and the Presi- dential Award of the American Neurological Association, and is listed in “The Best Doctors in America.” He has published more than 200 peer- reviewed articles and book chapters. Dr. DeKosky’s academic career began in 1978 at the University of Virginia, School of Medicine in Char- lottesville, where he was an instructor in the Department of Neurology

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50 FROM MOLECULES TO MINDS until 1979 and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in neurochemistry at the Clinical Neuroscience Research Center in the Department of Neurol- ogy. Before joining the UPMC in 1990, Dr. DeKosky was on the faculty of the University of Kentucky, College of Medicine for 11 years, serving as codirector of the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center and interim chair of Neurology for 2 years. From 1992 to 2000, he was head of the Division of Geriatrics and Neuropsychiatry in the Department of Psy- chiatry at the University of Pittsburgh and Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, where he holds a joint appointment as professor of psychia- try. After earning a bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Bucknell Uni- versity, PA. Dr. DeKosky attended the University of Florida–Gainesville for graduate studies in psychology and neuroscience. In 1974, Dr. De- Kosky graduated from the University of Florida College of Medicine. After an internship in internal medicine at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, Dr. DeKosky completed a 3-year residency in neurology at the Univer- sity of Florida in 1978. Michael Greenberg, Ph.D., is the director of the Division of Neurosci- ences at Children’s Hospital Boston and professor of neurology and neu- robiology at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Greenberg received his Ph.D. from The Rockefeller University and completed a postdoctoral fellow- ship in molecular biology at that institution. He subsequently completed a fellowship in molecular biology at New York University Medical Cen- ter. He holds the F. M. Kirby Foundation Neuroscience Directorship at Children’s Hospital Boston. Research in the Greenberg lab has focused on identifying the mechanisms by which extracellular stimuli trigger cel- lular responses that are critical for proliferation, differentiation, and sur- vival of cells in the developing nervous system and for the adaptive responses of neurons in the mature nervous system. Bin He, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineer- ing at the University of Minnesota. Dr. He received his B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Zhejiang University in 1982, and his Ph.D. in Bio- medical Engineering with the highest honors from Tokyo Institute of Technology, a Nobel Prize–winning campus in 1988. He completed the postdoctoral fellowship in biomedical engineering at Harvard Univer- sity–Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). After working as a research scientist at MIT, he was on faculty of the Departments of Elec- trical Engineering and Bioengineering at the University of Illinois– Chicago, where he was named a University Scholar by the president of

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51 APPENDIX D the University of Illinois. Since January 2004, he has been a professor of biomedical engineering, electrical engineering, and neuroscience, and director of the Biomedical Functional Imaging and Neuroengineering Laboratory at the University of Minnesota. Dr. He’s research interests include functional biomedical imaging, neuroengineering, cardiovascular engineering, and bioelectromagnetism. Steven Hyman, M.D., is provost of Harvard University and a professor of neurobiology at Harvard Medical School. From 1996 to 2001, he served as NIMH Director. Earlier, he was a professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School; director of psychiatry research at Massachu- setts General Hospital; and the first faculty director of Harvard Univer- sity’s Mind, Brain, and Behavior Initiative. In the laboratory he studied the regulation of gene expression by neurotransmitters, especially dopa- mine, and by drugs that influence dopamine systems. This research was aimed at understanding addiction and the action of therapeutic psycho- tropic drugs. Dr. Hyman is a member of the IOM, a fellow of the Ameri- can Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a fellow of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology. He is editor-in-chief of the An- nual Review of Neuroscience and has won public service awards from the federal government and patient advocacy groups such as the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill and the National Mental Health Association. Dr. Hyman received his B.A., summa cum laude, from Yale College in 1974, and an M.A. from the University of Cambridge, which he attended as a Mellon Fellow studying the history and philosophy of science. He earned his M.D., cum laude, from Harvard Medical School in 1980. Thomas R. Insel, M.D., graduated from Boston University, where he received a B.A. from the College of Liberal Arts and an M.D. from the Medical School. He did his internship at Berkshire Medical Center, Pitts- field, MA, and his residency at the Langley Porter Neuropsychiatric In- stitute at the University of California, San Francisco. In 1979 Dr. Insel joined NIMH, where he served in various scientific research positions until 1994, when he became as a professor, Department of Psychiatry, Emory University School of Medicine, and director of the Yerkes Re- gional Primate Research Center. As director of Yerkes, Dr. Insel built one of the nation’s leading HIV vaccine research programs. He also served as the founding director of the Center for Behavioral Neurosci- ence, a Science and Technology Center, funded by NSF to develop an interdisciplinary consortium for research and education at eight Atlanta

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52 FROM MOLECULES TO MINDS colleges and universities. Dr. Insel’s scientific interests have ranged from clinical studies of obsessive-compulsive disorder to explorations of the molecular basis of social behaviors in rodents and nonhuman primates. His research on oxytocin and affiliative behaviors, such as parental care and pair bonding, helped to launch the field of social neuroscience. Dr. Insel oversees the NIMH’s $1.4 billion research budget, which supports to investigators at universities throughout the country in the areas of ba- sic science; clinical research, including large-scale trials of new treat- ments; and studies of the organization and delivery of mental health services. Story C. Landis, Ph.D., has been director of NINDS since September 2003. Dr. Landis oversees an annual budget of $1.5 billion and a staff of more than 900 scientists, physician–scientists, and administrators. The Institute supports research by investigators in public and private institu- tions across the country, as well as by scientists working in its intramural laboratories and branches in Bethesda, MD. Since 1950, the Institute has been at the forefront of U.S. efforts in brain research. Dr. Landis joined the NINDS in 1995 as scientific director and worked with then-Institute Director Zach W. Hall, Ph.D., to coordinate and reengineer the Institute’s intramural research programs. Between 1999 and 2000, under the leader- ship of NINDS Director Gerald D. Fischbach, M.D., she led the move- ment, together with NIMH Scientific Director Robert Desimone, Ph.D., to bring a sense of unity and common purpose to 200 laboratories from 11 NIH Institutes, all of which conduct leading-edge clinical and basic neuroscience research. A native of New England, Dr. Landis received her undergraduate degree in Biology from Wellesley College in 1967 and her master’s degree (1970) and Ph.D. (1973) from Harvard University, where she conducted research on cerebellar development in mice. After postdoctoral work at Harvard University studying transmitter plasticity in sympathetic neurons, she served on the faculty of the Harvard Medical School Department of Neurobiology. In 1985 she joined the faculty of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland, OH. She held many academic positions there, including associate professor of pharmacology; professor and director of the Center on Neurosciences; and chair of the Department of Neurosciences, a department she was in- strumental in establishing. Under her leadership, Case Western’s Neuro- sciences Department achieved worldwide acclaim and a reputation for excellence. Throughout her research career, Dr. Landis has made many fundamental contributions to the understanding of developmental inter-

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53 APPENDIX D actions required for synapse formation. She has garnered many honors and awards and is an elected Fellow of the Academy of Arts and Sci- ences, AAAS, and the American Neurological Association. In 2002, she was named president-elect of the Society for Neuroscience. Ting-Kai (TK) Li, M.D., earned his undergraduate degree from North- western University and his M.D. from Harvard University, and com- pleted his residency training at Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston, where he was named chief medical resident in 1965. He also conducted research at the Nobel Medical Research and Karolinska Institutes in Stockholm and served as deputy director of the Department of Biochem- istry within the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. Dr. Li joined the faculty at Indiana University as professor of medicine and biochemis- try in 1971. He was subsequently named the school’s John B. Hickam Professor of Medicine and Professor of Biochemistry and later Distin- guished Professor of Medicine. In 1985 he became director of the Indi- ana Alcohol Research Center at the Indiana University School of Medicine, where he also was the associate dean for research. Dr. Li is the recipient of numerous awards for his scientific accomplishments, includ- ing the Jellinek Award, the James B. Isaacson Award for Research in Chemical Dependency Diseases, and the R. Brinkley Smithers Distin- guished Science Award. Dr. Li has also served in many prominent lead- ership and advisory positions, including past president of the Research Society on Alcoholism, and as a member of the National Advisory Council on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and the Advisory Committee to the Director, NIH. Dr. Li was elected to membership in the IOM in 1999 and is also an honorary Fellow of the United Kingdom’s Society for the Study of Addiction. Jeff Lichtman, Ph.D., is professor of molecular and cellular biology at Harvard University. Dr. Lichtman’s interests lie in the mechanisms that underlie synaptic competition among neurons that innervate the same target cell. Such competitive interactions are responsible for sharpening the patterns of neural connections during development and may also be important in learning and memory formation. His laboratory studies syn- aptic competition by visualizing synaptic rearrangements directly in liv- ing animals using modern optical imaging techniques. They have concentrated on neuromuscular junctions in a very accessible neck mus- cle in mice where new transgenic animals and other labeling strategies allow individual nerve terminals and postsynaptic specializations to be

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54 FROM MOLECULES TO MINDS monitored over hours or months. In addition, they have developed sev- eral new methods to improve the ability to resolve synaptic structure. Eve Marder, Ph.D., is the Victor and Gwendolyn Beinfield Professor of Neuroscience in the Biology Department and Volen Center for Complex Systems at Brandeis University. She received her Ph.D. in 1974 from UCSD (the University of California, San Diego), and subsequently con- ducted a one-year postdoctoral at the University of Oregon, then a 3-year postdoc at the Ecole Normale Superieure in Paris. She became an assis- tant professor in the Biology Department at Brandeis University in 1978, and was promoted to professor in 1990. During her time at Brandeis, Dr. Marder has been instrumental in the establishment of undergraduate and graduate programs in neuroscience. She is a fellow of AAAS, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a trustee of the Grass Foundation. She was the Forbes Lecturer at the MBL in 2000 and the Einer Hille Lecturer at the University of Washington in 2002. Dr. Marder has studied the dynamics of small neuronal networks using the crusta- cean stomatogastric nervous system. Her work was instrumental in dem- onstrating that neuronal circuits are not “hardwired,” but can be reconfigured by neuromodulatory neurons and substances to produce a variety of outputs. Together with Larry Abbott, her laboratory pioneered the “dynamic clamp.” Marder was one of the first experimentalists to forge long-standing collaborations with theorists, and has for nearly 15 years combined experimental work with insights from modeling and theoretical studies. Her work today focuses on understanding how stabil- ity in networks arises despite ongoing channel and receptor turnover and modulation, both in developing and adult animals. Tom Mitchell, Ph.D., is the E. Fredkin Professor and head of the Ma- chine Learning Department at Carnegie Mellon University. His research interests are generally in machine learning, artificial intelligence, and cognitive neuroscience. Dr. Mitchell is author of the widely used text- book Machine Learning. He is past chair of the AAAS Section on Infor- mation, Computing, and Communication. He is past president of the American Association of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI), and a recent member of the National Research Council’s Computer Science and Tele- communications Board. Dr. Mitchell’s recent research includes the use of machine learning and brain imaging (fMRI) to study the neural repre- sentation of word meanings in the human brain. One recent result showed that the neural activity representing meanings of concrete nouns

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55 APPENDIX D such as “hammer” and “apartment” are quite similar across different people, as demonstrated by the fact that a classifier trained on a group of people would successfully decode the item being considered by new people. A second recent result proposed a computer model that predicts the fMRI neural activity representation for arbitrary concrete nouns, based on statistics of the noun’s use in a trillion-word collection of online text. Read Montague, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Neurosci- ence at Baylor College of Medicine, where he is also director of the Hu- man Neuroimaging Lab and director of the Center for Theoretical Neuroscience. His work focuses on computational neuroscience—the connection between the physical mechanisms present in real neural tissue and the computational functions that these mechanisms embody. Work in the Montague group also extends into several experimental areas, includ- ing synaptic physiology, human neuroimaging, and human behavior. The Montague lab is also a member of The Computational Psychiatry Unit, a new unit dedicated to understanding the computational connections be- tween biological mechanisms and psychiatric illness Jonathan Moreno, Ph.D., is the David and Lyn Silfen University Pro- fessor and professor of medical ethics and of history and sociology of science at the University of Pennsylvania. He comes to Penn in connec- tion with the Penn Integrates Knowledge (PIK) initiative, a University- wide initiative launched in 2005 by Penn President Amy Gutmann to recruit exceptional faculty members whose research and teaching exem- plify the integration of knowledge across disciplines. Dr. Moreno holds a joint appointment in HSS (School of Arts and Sciences) and in medical ethics in the School of Medicine. He is also a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress in Washington, DC and a visiting professor of biomedical ethics at the University of Virginia. From 1998 to 2006, Dr. Moreno held the Emily Davie and Joseph S. Kornfeld Chair in Biomedi- cal Ethics at the University of Virginia. Dr. Moreno is an elected member of the IOM and has been a member of numerous National Academies committees. He co-chaired the Committee on Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. He has served as a senior staff member for two Presidential advisory committees and has given invited testimony for both houses of Congress.

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66 FROM MOLECULES TO MINDS he was executive vice president for neuroscience at Merck Research Labs. He is an AAAS Fellow and a member of the IOM, the Executive Committee of the Dana Alliance for Brain Research, and the College of Physicians of Philadelphia. He has served as president of the Society for Neuroscience, vice president of the American Neurological Association, and chairman of the U.S./Canada Regional Committee of the Interna- tional Brain Research Organization. He has also served on the National Academy of Sciences’ Board on Life Sciences, and Councils for NINDS, the Society for Neuroscience, the Winter Conference for Brain Research, the International Society for Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, and the Neurotrauma Society. He has been a member of advisory boards for the Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation, Grass Foundation, Heredi- tary Disease Foundation, Spinal Muscular Atrophy Foundation, Har- vard–MIT Program in Health Sciences and Technology, Queen’s Neuroscience Institute in Honolulu, Max Planck Institute in Heidelberg, Korea Institute for Advanced Study in Seoul, and the FDA, as well as for several university-based research consortia, biotechnology companies, and pharmaceutical companies. He graduated from Harvard College in 1974, and received his M.D. and Ph.D. in 1978 (the latter in Pharmacol- ogy) from Harvard University and the Harvard–MIT Program in Health Sciences and Technology. After completing his residency and fellowship training in Neurology at Harvard, he joined the faculty at Stanford Uni- versity and began research into the mechanisms underlying pathological neuronal death. Timothy Coetzee, Ph.D., see Speaker bio. David H. Cohen, Ph.D., see Planning Committee bio. Richard Frank, M.D., Ph.D., is vice president of clinical and medical strategy at GE Healthcare, Princeton, NJ. He has two decades of experi- ence in designing and implementing clinical trials in the pharmaceutical industry, and built the Experimental Medicine Department at Pharmacia before joining GE Healthcare in 2005. Dr. Frank earned M.D. and Ph.D. (Pharmacology) degrees concurrently and joined the pharmaceutical in- dustry upon completion of his clinical training in 1985. He is past presi- dent and founding director of the Society of Non-invasive Imaging in Drug Development and a Fellow of the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Medi- cine, Royal College of Physicians. He serves on the scientific review

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67 APPENDIX D board for the Institute for the Study of Aging and is a member of the edi- torial board of Molecular Imaging and Biology. Richard Hodes, M.D., see Planning Committee bio. Steven Hyman, M.D., see Speaker bio. Judy Illes, Ph.D., see Planning Committee bio. Thomas R. Insel, M.D., see Speaker bio. Story C. Landis, Ph.D., see Speaker bio. Ting-Kai (TK) Li, M.D., see Speaker bio. Husseini K. Manji, M.D., F.R.C.P.C., is vice president, CNS & pain, Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development. Previ- ously Dr. Manji served as chief of the Laboratory of Molecular Patho- physiology, NIMH, and director of the NIMH Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program, the largest program of its kind in the world. He is also a visiting professor in the Departments of Psychiatry at Columbia University and Duke University. Dr. Manji received his B.S. in Bio- chemistry and M.D. from the University of British Columbia. Following psychiatry residency training, he completed fellowship training in Psy- chopharmacology at the NIMH and obtained extensive additional train- ing in Cellular and Molecular Biology at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disorders. The major focus of his ongoing research is the investigation of disease- and treatment-induced changes in gene and protein expression profiles that regulate cellular plasticity and resilience in mood disorders. In broad terms, his laborato- ries’ scientific goals are to capitalize on recent insights into our under- standing of the signaling pathways mediating the effects of mood stabilizers in order to understand the pathophysiology of severe mood disorders and to develop improved therapeutics. He has received ongoing research funding for his work on signaling pathways, plasticity, and new medication development for severe mood disorders. Dr. Manji has re- ceived numerous research awards, including the A. E. Bennett Award for Neuropsychiatric Research, the Ziskind-Somerfeld Award for Neuropsy- chiatric Research, the National Alliance for Research in Schizophrenia and Affective Disorders (NARSAD) Mood Disorders Prize (Nola

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68 FROM MOLECULES TO MINDS Maddox Falcone Prize), the Mogens Schou Distinguished Research Award, the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP) Joel Elkes award for distinguished research, the Canadian Association of Professors in Psychiatry Award, the Henry and Page Laughlin Distin- guished Teacher Award, the Brown University School of Medicine Dis- tinguished Researcher Award, and the NIMH award for excellence in clinical care and research. In addition to his research endeavors, Dr. Manji is also actively involved in medical and neuroscience education endeavors, and has served as a member of the National Board of Medical Examiners Behavioral Science Test Committee, numerous national cur- riculum committees, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Research Scholars Program Selection and Advisory Committee, and NIMH’s pro- motion and tenure committee. He developed and directs the NIH Foun- dation for the Advanced Education in the Sciences graduate course in the Neurobiology of Mental Illness, and has received both the NIMH Mentor of the Year and Supervisor of the Year awards. He has published exten- sively on the molecular and cellular neurobiology of severe mood disor- ders and their treatments, has authored numerous textbook chapters, and has edited a book on the mechanisms of action of antibipolar treatments. He is a Fellow of the ACNP, chairs the ACNP’s Task Force on New Medication Development, and is a member of the ACNP’s Credentialing Committee. He is a member of the NARSAD Scientific Advisory Com- mittee, National Alliance for the Mentally Ill Center on Practice & Re- search Advisory Committee, the Child and Adolescent Bipolar Foundation Professional Advisory Council, and the Scientific Advisory Board of the Juvenile Bipolar Research Foundation. Dr. Manji is editor of Neuropsychopharmacology Reviews: The Next Generation of Pro- gress, deputy editor of Biological Psychiatry, associate editor of the journal Bipolar Disorders, and a member of the editorial board of nu- merous journals. Michael D. Oberdorfer, Ph.D., see Planning Committee bio. Kathie L. Olsen, Ph.D., see Speaker bio. Atul Pande, M.D., is senior vice president, Neurosciences Medicines Development Center at GlaxoSmithKline. Dr. Pande received his medi- cal training in India and trained in psychiatry in India and subsequently at the University of Western Ontario in Canada. Following a mood dis- orders research fellowship at the University of Michigan Medical School,

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69 APPENDIX D Dr. Pande served on the Department of Psychiatry faculty. In 1992, Dr. Pande joined the Lilly Research Laboratories in Indianapolis. Since then he has continued his career in pharmaceutical research and has held posi- tions at Parke-Davis Pharmaceutical Research (now part of Pfizer), Pfizer Global R&D, and CeNeRx Biopharma. Dr. Pande has drug devel- opment and regulatory submission experience in a broad range of psy- chiatric and neurological disorders. Dr. Pande has more than 50 peer- reviewed publications, 6 patents, and numerous book chapters, abstracts, and scientific presentations to his credit. Dr. Pande is a member of the Society of Biological Psychiatry, and a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, the American Psychiatric Associa- tion, the Canadian College of Neuropsychopharmacology, and the Col- legium Internationale Neuro-Psychopharmacologicum. Menelas Pangalos, Ph.D., is vice president, Neuroscience Research, at Wyeth Research in Princeton, NJ. He previously served as group director and head of Neurodegenerative Research at GlaxoSmithKline in Harlow, United Kingdom. He presents widely on a broad range of topics at inter- national symposia on subjects ranging from strategies for the novel treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and GABAB receptor molecular phar- macology to challenges in neuroscience drug discovery. Dr. Pangalos is on the editorial board of Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, on the advisory board for the Wolfson Centre for Age Related Diseases (Lon- don University), and has served on the BBSRC Molecular and Cell Biol- ogy committee in the United Kingdom. He is also a member of the American Society of Neuroscience and British Pharmacological Society, and an associate of the Royal College of Science. Dr. Pangalos has edited the book Understanding G-protein Coupled Receptors in the CNS and has published more than 60 peer-reviewed articles in professional jour- nals such as British Journal of Psychiatry, Journal of Neuroscience, Na- ture Neuroscience, The Lancet, Journal of Biological Chemistry, Neuroscience, Genomics, and Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience. Dr. Pangalos completed his undergraduate studies in Biochemistry from the Imperial College of Science and Technology and earned a Ph.D. in Neu- rochemistry from the Institute of Neurology, both at the University of London. Steven Marc Paul, M.D., is executive vice president of science and technology and president of the Lilly Research Laboratories of Eli Lilly and Company. Dr. Paul joined Lilly in April 1993, initially as a vice pre-

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70 FROM MOLECULES TO MINDS sident of LRL responsible for CNS Discovery and Decision Phase Medi- cal Research. In 1996, Dr. Paul was appointed vice president (and in 1998 group vice president) of Therapeutic Area Discovery Research and Clinical Investigation. In this position his responsibilities included all therapeutic area discovery research, medicinal chemistry, toxicol- ogy/drug disposition, and decision phase (Phase I/II) medical research. He and his leadership team were responsible for meeting the pipeline performance objectives of LRL and improving R&D productivity, espe- cially in discovery and the early phases of clinical development. In 2003, Dr. Paul was named executive vice president of the Company and presi- dent of LRL with responsibility for all R&D at Lilly. In 2005, Dr. Paul was named Chief Scientific Officer of the Year as one of the Annual Pharmaceutical Achievement Awards. Prior to assuming his position at Lilly, Dr. Paul served as scientific director of NIMH. He received his B.A., magna cum laude, in Biology and Psychology from Tulane Uni- versity in 1972. He received his M.S. in Anatomy (Neuroanatomy) and his M.D., both in 1975, from the Tulane University School of Medicine. Following an internship in neurology at Charity Hospital in New Or- leans, he served as a resident in psychiatry and as an instructor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine. In 1976, he was awarded a research fellowship in the Phar- macology Research Associate Training Program of the National Institute of General Medical Science to work with Nobel Laureate Dr. Julius Ax- elrod in the Laboratory of Clinical Science, IRP, of the NIMH. In June 1978, he became a clinical associate in the Clinical Psychobiology Branch of NIMH. In 1982, Dr. Paul was appointed chief of the Clinical Neuroscience Branch as well as chief of the Section on Preclinical Stud- ies, IRP, NIMH. Dr. Paul also served as medical director in the Commis- sioned Corps of the Public Health Service, and maintained a private practice in psychiatry and psychopharmacology. He is board certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology and has been elected a Fellow in the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP), served on the ACNP Council, and was elected president of the ACNP (1999). He also serves on the executive board of PhRMA’s Science and Regulatory Committee and is incoming chairperson. Dr. Paul served as a member of the National Advisory General Medical Sciences Council, NIH (1996–1999), and was appointed by the Secretary of Health and Human Services to serve as a member of the Advisory Committee to the director of NIH (2001–2006).

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71 APPENDIX D William Z. Potter, M.D., Ph.D., see Planning Committee bio. Scott A. Reines, M.D., Ph.D., currently is senior scientist, Foundation for NIH, and is involved in various consulting activities related to the pharmaceutical industry. Dr. Reines retired in September 2008 from Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical R&D, where he was senior vice president for CNS, Pain, and Translational Medicine. His department included Clinical Pharmacology/Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacogenom- ics, as well as the CNS, Pain, and Mature Products Therapeutic Areas. Dr. Reines received his undergraduate degree magna cum laude in Chemistry from Cornell University, and his Ph.D. in bio/organic chemis- try from Columbia University. He was awarded an M.D. from Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and completed his psychiatric residency at Montefiore Hospital in New York. Following his training he joined the Merck Research Laboratories, where he rose to the rank of vice presi- dent, clinical research with responsibilities for Psychopharmacology, Neuropharmacology, Gastroenterology, and Ophthalmology. While at Merck he was responsible for the development of numerous medically important drugs, including the substance P antagonist Emend (aprepitant) for prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, Maxalt for treatment of migraine headache, Sinemet CR for Parkinson’s disease, as well as the antiglaucoma drugs Trusopt and Cosopt. During his 5 years at J&J, Dr. Reines had responsibility for the approvals of Invega for schizophrenia, Reminyl Extended Release for Alzheimer’s disease, Risperdal Consta for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, Risperdal for autism, and Topamax for migraine headache and monotherapy in epi- lepsy. His research groups also led the development programs for the analgesic drug tapentadol, the long-acting antipsychotic agent paliperi- done palmitate, and other potential treatments for various CNS disorders. Over the course of his career, Dr. Reines has published in numerous sci- entific journals, including Science, JAMA, New England Journal of Medicine, and the ACNP journal Neuropsychopharmacology. He and Dr. Huda Akil recently served as the first co-chairs of the Neuroscience Steering Committee of the Foundation for the NIH Biomarkers Consor- tium. Prior to that, he served for 5 years as a member of the National Drug Abuse Advisory Council and its Bioethics Task Force. Paul A. Sieving, M.D., Ph.D., see Planning Committee bio. Rae Silver, Ph.D., see Planning Committee bio.

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72 FROM MOLECULES TO MINDS William H. Thies, Ph.D., is vice president for medical and scientific relations at the Alzheimer’s Association, where he oversees the world’s largest private, nonprofit Alzheimer’s disease research grants program. Under his direction, the organization’s annual grant budget has doubled, and the program has designated special focus areas targeting the relation- ship between cardiovascular risk factors and Alzheimer’s disease, care- giving and care systems, and research involving diverse populations. He played a key role in launching Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association, and in establishing the Research Roundta- ble, a consortium of senior scientists from industry, academia, and gov- ernment who convene regularly to explore common barriers to drug discovery. In previous work at the American Heart Association (AHA) from 1988 to 1998, Dr. Thies formed a new stroke division that recently became the American Stroke Association. He also built the Emergency Cardiac Care Program, a continuing medical education program that trains more than 3 million professionals annually. He has worked with the NINDS to form the Brain Attack Coalition. Prior to joining the AHA, he held faculty positions at Indiana University in Bloomington and the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Thies earned a B.A. in Biology from Lake Forest College in Illinois and a Ph.D. in Pharmacology from the Univer- sity of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Roy E. Twyman, M.D., see Planning Committee bio. Nora D. Volkow, M.D., see Speaker bio. Frank Yocca, Ph.D., is currently vice president and head of CNS and pain drug discovery for AstraZeneca in Wilmington, DE. His research focus is on new treatments for psychiatric diseases. Dr. Yocca received his Ph.D. in Pharmacology from St. John’s University in New York City. His work focused on the effect of antidepressants on circadian rhythms. Subsequently he was a postdoctoral fellow at Mt. Sinai Department of Pharmacology. Prior to joining AstraZeneca, Dr. Yocca was executive director at the BristolMyersSquibb Pharmaceutical Research Institute. Dr. Yocca originally joined the Bristol Myers Company in 1984 as a postdoctoral fellow in CNS research. Using techniques he learned from his academic postdoctoral position, he helped to elucidate the mechanism of action of the anxiolytic drug Buspar. He then joined Bristol Myers and made significant advances in understanding the physiological role of the 5-HT1A receptor and its role in psychiatric disease states. During the 21

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73 APPENDIX D years Dr. Yocca spent with Bristol-Myers and then BristolMyersSquibb, he supported a number of psychiatric discovery programs, helping to dis- cover and develop the antidepressant drug Serzone. Throughout his ten- ure, Dr. Yocca continued to work in the field of serotonin and advanced a number of agents to clinical trials, including several antimigraine agents (avitriptan) as well as antipsychotics and anxiolytics. In the latter stages of his career at BristolMyersSquibb, Dr. Yocca became involved in externalization and development. He contributed to the in-licensing and development of the antipsychotic agent Abilify. Additionally, Dr. Yocca was part of the externalization team that in-licensed to Bristol- MyersSquibb the recently approved antidepressant agent Emsam, the first antidepressant to be administered through a patch. In development, he was early development project leader for CRF antagonists and was involved in Phase IV clinical trials with Abilify. Dr. Yocca is a member of numerous scientific societies, including SFN and ACNP. Christian G. Zimmerman, M.D., F.A.C.S., M.B.A., is chair and foun- der of the Idaho Neurological Institute (INI); adjunct professor of psy- chology at Boise State University; and past chief executive officer of Neuroscience Associates. He has also served as a board member for the Idaho State Board of Health and Welfare. Dr. Zimmerman established the INI research facility to focus on nervous system injury, repair, and neuroplasticity. He leads its various interdisciplinary research teams and is coprofessor for biology and cognitive neuroscience research students trained at the facility. Research projects include a 20-year longitudinal study of traumatic brain injury, investigations of spinal injury, stroke, aneurysms, arterial thrombolytic therapy intervention, neuropathology, CNS tumors, sleep disorders, deep-brain stimulation, movement disor- ders, and five TATRC telemedicine grants. In his role as INI chair, he has facilitated numerous symposia and workshops to provide educational opportunities for medical professionals and the public. Dr. Zimmerman is a diplomate of the American Board of Neurological Surgery and Pain Management and a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons and Physician Executives. He received his M.B.A. from Auburn University.

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74 FROM MOLECULES TO MINDS STAFF Bruce M. Altevogt, Ph.D., is a senior program officer on the Board on Health Sciences Policy at the IOM. His primary interests focus on policy issues related to basic research, and preparedness for catastrophic events. He received his doctorate from Harvard University’s Program in Neuro- science. Following more than 10 years of research, Dr. Altevogt joined The National Academies as a science and technology policy fellow with the Christine Mirzayan Science & Technology Policy Graduate Fellow- ship Program. Since joining the Board on Health Sciences Policy, he has been a program officer on multiple IOM studies, including Sleep Disor- ders and Sleep Deprivation: An Unmet Public Health Problem, The Na- tional Academies’ Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research: 2007 Amendments, and Research Priorities in Emergency Preparedness and Response for Public Health Systems. He is currently serving as director of the Forum on Medical and Public Health Prepared- ness for Catastrophic Events, the Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders Forum, and as a co-study director on the National Academy of Sciences Human Embryonic Stem Cells Research Advisory Committee. He received his B.A. from the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, where he majored in Biology and minored in South Asian Studies. Andrew M. Pope, Ph.D., is the director of the Board on Health Sciences Policy at the IOM. With a Ph.D. in Physiology and Biochemistry, his primary interests are in science policy, biomedical ethics, and the envi- ronmental and occupational influences on human health. During his ten- ure at The National Academies and since 1989 at the IOM, Dr. Pope has directed numerous studies on topics that range from injury control, dis- ability prevention, and biologic markers to the protection of human sub- jects of research, NIH priority-setting processes, organ procurement and transplantation policy, and the role of science and technology in counter- ing terrorism. Dr. Pope is the recipient of the National Academy of Sci- ences President’s Special Achievement Award and the IOM’s Cecil Award. Sarah L. Hanson is a senior program associate for the Board on Health Sciences Policy at the IOM. Ms. Hanson previously worked for the Com- mittee on Sleep Medicine and Research. She is currently the senior pro- gram associate for the Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders. Prior to joining the IOM, she served as research and program

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75 APPENDIX D assistant at the National Research Center for Women & Families. Ms. Hanson has a B.A. from the University of Kansas, with a double major in Political Science and International Studies. She recently completed a post-baccalaureate pre-med program at the University of Maryland and hopes to attend medical school. Lora K. Taylor is a senior project assistant for the Board on Health Sci- ences Policy at the IOM. She has 15 years of experience working in The National Academies. Prior to joining the IOM, she served as the adminis- trative associate for the Report Review Committee and the Division on Life Sciences’ Ocean Studies Board. Ms. Taylor has a B.A. from Georgetown University with a double major in Psychology and Fine Arts. Dionna Ali served as an Anderson intern. For the past 2 years, she has worked with Daniel Talmage of the Air Force Studies Board within the Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences. This past summer she also interned at the Kaiser Family Foundation, working with Sean Wieland and Hillary Carrere of the Technology Working Group. At Kai- ser, she helped arrange conferences and produce webcasts about health care policy, Medicaid/Medicare, and HIV/AIDS. Ms. Ali is a junior at the University of Virginia, where she majors in anthropology and is pre- paring for medical school. She aspires to become a neurologist or a psy- chiatrist.

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