E
Biographical Sketches of Invited Speakers, Panelists, Workshop Planning Committee, Forum Members, and Staff

INVITED SPEAKERS AND PANELISTS

Lynne Kidder, M.A. (Workshop Co-Chair), is the senior vice president of Business Executives for National Security (BENS). She oversees nation-wide implementation and operations of BENS’ Regional Partnership programs, including the facilitation of resilience-focused public–private partnerships, and the development of programs, policies and recommendations for enabling public-private collaboration at all levels of government. In addition to providing management support to BENS-affiliated partnerships in New Jersey, Georgia, Kansas City, Iowa, the San Francisco Bay Area, Los Angeles/Orange Counties, California, and Colorado, she also consults with developing partnership initiatives in a half-dozen other states. Ms. Kidder’s previous professional experience includes executive level management in state government and 8 years as professional staff in the U.S. Senate. She also served as the congressional affairs manager for the global engineering and construction firm, Bechtel Corporation. Immediately prior to joining BENS, she was the executive director of the North Bay Council, a nonprofit business leadership group in Northern California, where she led numerous collaborative initiatives between private employers, public officials and other civic leaders. She holds a B.A. from Indiana University, a master’s degree from the University of Texas at Austin, and did additional postgraduate study in public administration at George Mason University.


Matthew Minson, M.D. (Workshop Co-Chair), is the senior medical officer for Strategic Initiatives at the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)/Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and



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E Biographical Sketches of Invited Speakers, Panelists, Workshop Planning Committee, Forum Members, and Staff INVITED SPEAKERS AND PANELISTS Lynne Kidder, M.A. (Workshop Co-Chair), is the senior vice president of Business Executives for National Security (BENS). She oversees na- tion-wide implementation and operations of BENS’ Regional Partnership programs, including the facilitation of resilience-focused public–private partnerships, and the development of programs, policies and recommen- dations for enabling public-private collaboration at all levels of govern- ment. In addition to providing management support to BENS-affiliated partnerships in New Jersey, Georgia, Kansas City, Iowa, the San Fran- cisco Bay Area, Los Angeles/Orange Counties, California, and Colorado, she also consults with developing partnership initiatives in a half-dozen other states. Ms. Kidder’s previous professional experience includes ex- ecutive level management in state government and 8 years as profes- sional staff in the U.S. Senate. She also served as the congressional affairs manager for the global engineering and construction firm, Bechtel Corporation. Immediately prior to joining BENS, she was the executive director of the North Bay Council, a nonprofit business leadership group in Northern California, where she led numerous collaborative initiatives between private employers, public officials and other civic leaders. She holds a B.A. from Indiana University, a master’s degree from the Uni- versity of Texas at Austin, and did additional postgraduate study in pub- lic administration at George Mason University. Matthew Minson, M.D. (Workshop Co-Chair), is the senior medical officer for Strategic Initiatives at the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)/Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and 67

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68 DISPENSING MEDICAL COUNTERMEASURES Response (ASPR). He also serves on the Chancellor’s Council for the University of Texas and is a principal member of the National Fire Pro- tection Association’s Technical Committee, 471, 472, and 473. Prior to joining HHS/ASPR, Dr. Minson was the director of the Maryland De- partment of Health and Mental Hygiene, Office of Preparedness and Re- sponse. He previously worked as the medical program coordinator for the National Emergency Response and Rescue Training Center located at Texas A&M University, and served on the Oil and Gas Industry’s Corpo- rate Emergency Response Team. He also held the position of director of emergency management and medical review for Harris County, TX. He was a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) sponsor-investigator during his appointment at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. He has been a CONTOMS physician in support of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, ATF, and the Texas Department of Public Safety. Dr. Minson is an ex- pert on mass casualty medical management. He has responded to a num- ber of disasters, including the World Trade Center, the Columbia Shuttle recovery, several hurricanes, and most recently Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Dr. Minson received his M.D. from the University of Texas Medi- cal Branch and completed his residency in Anesthesiology at the Univer- sity of Texas Medical School, Houston. Prasith (Sid) Baccam, Ph.D., is senior scientist for Innovative Emer- gency Management (IEM), Inc., Bel Air, MD. IEM is a risk management company providing services to private industry and government agen- cies. He received his Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics and Immunobiology from Iowa State University. Dr. Baccam was a postdoctoral research as- sociate at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Bruce Baker is the Strategic National Stockpile (SNS) coordinator for the state of Maryland. He joined the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene after a successful career as a Fleet Marine Force Enlisted Warfare Specialist Chief Hospital Corpsman. His prior assign- ments included: leading chief petty officer of the National Naval Medical Pharmacy; plans operations and medical intelligence officer onboard the USNS Comfort, deployed during Hurricanes Katrina and Rita; medical operations chief for 3rd Battalion 24th Marines; and medical planning chief for the 1st Marine Expeditionary Brigade. He has been awarded four Navy Commendation Medals, five Navy Achievement Medals, six Good Conduct Medals, a Humanitarian Service Medal, and a Sea Service Deployment Ribbon.

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69 APPENDIX E Teresa Bates, L.V.N., is the SNS coordinator for Tarrant County (TX) Public Health. She has worked in public health for 8 years and prepared- ness for 5 years. Ms. Bates is responsible for the development and main- tenance of the SNS plan, collaboration with external partners, and oversight of the Corporate Point of Dispensing Program. In 2007 that program was selected as a Model Practice by the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO). Previously Ms. Bates was a public health nurse in a community immunization clinic. Before enter- ing public health she worked as a critical care nurse at John Peter Smith Hospital. In 1995 she graduated from the John Peter Smith Hospital Vo- cational Nursing School. Anthony Begando is the chief executive officer (CEO) of Tenon Con- sulting Solutions, Inc. Headquartered in Alpharetta, GA., Tenon provides management and operational development consulting services to com- mercial and public-sector organizations. Mr. Begando is a seasoned ex- ecutive with broad experience forming, developing, and leading both private and public corporations across several industry sectors. Mr. Begando has worked extensively with Business Executives for Na- tional Security and other nonprofit organizations in developing public and private solutions targeted at protecting the community and its assets from the effects of a large-scale disaster or attack. This includes specific initiatives aimed at large-scale pharmaceutical mass dispensing, catastro- phic natural disaster response and recovery, and collaborative pandemic disease management initiatives. Through his work at Tenon, Mr. Begando has also spearheaded the development of the Business Opera- tions Center concept, targeted at integrating private-sector capabilities into existing state and local emergency management infrastructures. He served for 3 years as an Army combat medic in Germany. Mr. Begando is a graduate of the University of Redlands, where he studied Economics and Information Systems. Richard E. Besser, M.D. (Session Chair), serves as director of the Cen- ter for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Coordinating Office for Terrorism Preparedness and Emergency Response (COTPER) and is responsible for CDC’s public health emergency preparedness and emer- gency response activities. COTPER is the primary CDC/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry organization tasked with over- sight of terrorism preparedness, response, and protection for the nation

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70 DISPENSING MEDICAL COUNTERMEASURES from biological, chemical, radiological, and naturally occurring emer- gencies. Dr. Besser began his career at CDC in the Epidemic Intelligence Service, working on the epidemiology of foodborne diseases. He has served as epidemiology section chief in the Respiratory Diseases Branch; acting chief of the Meningitis and Special Pathogens Branch in the Na- tional Center for Infectious Disease; and medical director of “Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work,” CDC’s national campaign to promote appropriate antibiotic use in the community. Dr. Besser received his B.A. in Economics from Williams College in Williamstown, MA, and his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. He completed a residency and chief residency in pediatrics at the John Hopkins University Hospital in Baltimore, MD. Margaret Binzer, J.D., is a partner in Government Affairs, McKenna Long & Aldridge, LLP. Ms. Binzer is an experienced public policy and legal counselor who focuses on a variety of issues relating to food, die- tary supplements, pharmaceuticals, medical devices, biotechnology, food, veterinary drugs, biodefense, pandemic influenza planning, and patient safety. In her role with McKenna Long & Aldridge, she concentrates her practice on health care and matters relating to the FDA. Previously, Ms. Binzer served as senior FDA health counsel to the Senate Budget Committee. She has also served as counsel to the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) Committee. Earlier, Ms. Binzer worked for 7 years in multiple roles at the FDA, including as counsel to the director of the Office of Nutritional Policy. While with the Grocery Manufacturers of America as assistant general counsel, Ms. Binzer represented the grocery industry in the implementation of the Nu- trition Labeling and Education Act. Ms. Binzer received her B.A. from Virginia Tech and her J.D. from the Marshall-Wythe School of Law, College of William and Mary, where she was a staff member of the Ad- ministrative Law Review. Pam Blackwell, R.N., is the director of the Center for Emergency Pre- paredness & Response for Cobb/Douglas Boards of Health. Ms. Black- well has 35 years of experience in emergency medicine and trauma care and served as the state trauma director for Georgia in the Office of Emergency Medical Services (EMS). The Center for Emergency Prepar- edness supports the “all-hazards” approach to planning and response and also recognizes the current emphasis on threats from biological, chemi- cal, nuclear, radiological, and pandemic influenza incidents.

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71 APPENDIX E James S. Blumenstock, M.A., is the chief program officer for public health practice for the Association of State and Territorial Health Offi- cials (ASTHO). His portfolio includes the state public health practice program areas of infectious and emerging diseases, immunization, envi- ronmental health, injury prevention, and public health preparedness and security, including pandemic influenza preparedness. Mr. Blumenstock also serves as a member of the Association’s Executive Management Team responsible for enterprise-wide strategic planning, administrative services, member support, and public health advocacy. Before his arrival at ASTHO, Mr. Blumenstock was the deputy commissioner of health for the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, from which he retired after nearly 32 years of career public health service. In this capacity, he had executive oversight responsibilities for a department branch of more than 650 staff and an operating budget of approximately $125 million. During his tenure, Mr. Blumenstock also represented the department on a number of boards, councils, and commissions, including the New Jersey Domestic Security Preparedness Task Force. Mr. Blu- menstock received his B.S. in Environmental Science from Rutgers Uni- versity and his M.A. in Health Sciences Administration from Jersey City State College. David Brown is the director of global employee relations strategy for The Coca Cola Company. Mr. Brown has more than 20 years of varied, international human resources (HR) experience. He joined The Coca- Cola Company in January 2006 and assumed leadership responsibility for the critical need of accelerating the company’s employee relations strategy and execution, working in close partnership with the Global La- bor Relations Director and Global Human Resources Directors. His re- sponsibilities include developing and deploying company strategies and programs in the areas of health and safety, infectious diseases, and HR policies in general. Mr. Brown is based at The Coca-Cola Company’s Corporate Office in Atlanta. Greg Burel is the senior executive service director, Division of Strategic National Stockpile, CDC. Before joining CDC, Mr. Burel spent 6 years at the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Region IV, which represents the Southeastern United States. Serving as the director of the Administration and Resource Planning Division, he oversaw the activities of two branches responsible for the administrative, personnel, financial, acquisition, communications, information technology, facili-

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72 DISPENSING MEDICAL COUNTERMEASURES ties, and disaster logistics operations. He worked in numerous declared disasters and emergencies as a logistics chief and Regional Operations Center director. He was responsible for all disaster logistics response and plans in the Southeastern United States. He has evaluated disaster opera- tions both inside and outside of the United States and was a member of the FEMA Logistics Advisory Group. Mr. Burel holds a Bachelor of Business Administration degree from Georgia State University. He is a graduate of the Federal Executive Institute’s Leadership for a Democ- ratic Society. He has also completed numerous courses in process im- provement, contracting, finance, and incident command. Karen Drenkard, Ph.D., R.N., M.S.N., C.N.A.A., is chief nurse execu- tive of Inova Health System, an integrated not-for-profit health care de- livery system in northern Virginia. The Inova system has five hospitals, long-term care centers, multiple ambulatory settings, and home health services. She is currently serving as the chief nurse executive at Inova Fairfax Hospital/Fairfax Hospital for Children. She has broad leadership experience in nursing and clinical operations, quality improvement, or- ganizational development, and management of large-scale change ef- forts. Her 20-year nursing history includes clinical experience in medical, oncology, and neurosurgical nursing, with experience as a nurs- ing director, patient care administrator, nursing supervisor, director of patient care delivery systems, and quality management consultant. Dr. Drenkard’s current areas of responsibility at Inova include nursing prac- tice, strategic planning for nursing services system-wide, strategic lead- ership of the chief nurse executive team, patient safety, patient education, and clinical policy setting. She is a 2003 Wharton Nurse Executive Fel- low, and a Robert Wood Johnson Nurse Executive Fellow, 2003–2006. In addition to her certification in nursing administration, advanced (C.N.A.A.) Dr. Drenkard is also a certified health care quality profes- sional. Stephanie Dulin (Planning Committee Member), is chief of the Program Preparedness Branch, Division of Strategic National Stockpile, CDC. Before becoming chief in 2006, Ms. Dulin was the Western Team Lead supervising program service consultants servicing the Midwestern and Western states. When Ms. Dulin joined the SNS in 2002, she was a pro- gram services consultant assigned to provide technical assistance in Ari- zona, Illinois, and the City of Chicago. Previously, Ms. Dulin was a CDC public health advisor providing direct technical assistance to the Arizona

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73 APPENDIX E Department of Health Services’ Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detec- tion Program. From 1995 to 1998, she held various positions with the state of Florida, Department of Health, Bureau of HIV/AIDS. In total, Ms. Dulin has 21 years of public health programming experience at the federal, state, and local levels of government. Jerry Ellsworth is the public health security coordinator for the Office of Public Health Preparedness (OPHP), Michigan Department of Com- munity Health. He oversees the protection of the Michigan Department of Public Health, OPHP, the Public Health Emergency Operations Center in Lansing, and the SNS statewide. Mr. Ellsworth acts as liaison and educator for first responders and law enforcement by conducting training activities in public health and hospital bioterrorism preparedness. He re- tired from the Department of Michigan State Police, Special Operations Division in 2003 as a lieutenant after 26 years of service. At the time of his retirement, Mr. Ellsworth was the commanding officer of the Emer- gency Support Team, which is the state police version of a special weap- ons and tactics unit. Mr. Ellsworth holds a B.A. in business and management from Michigan State University. Guy Farmer, J.D., is a partner at Holland and Knight, LLP, where he practices in the Labor and Employment Group. He is experienced in the representation of clients in a variety of industries, including paper com- panies, waste management, trucking, health care including hospitals, fi- nancial services, education, construction, and government contractors. Mr. Farmer represents employers locally, regionally, and nationally in the full range of employment-related issues. He has defended employers in more than 1,000 cases at both the trial and appellate levels in federal and state courts throughout the country involving allegations of employ- ment discrimination and other employment- and labor-related matters. His litigation and appellate practice has included the defense of employ- ers in cases involving individual claims, claims by federal and state gov- ernments, and significant class actions. Mr. Farmer holds a J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law. Paul Freibert, M.A., is a public health planner for the Louisville Metro Department of Public Health & Wellness in the state of Kentucky. In this role he coordinates public health emergency preparedness efforts with community-wide emergency planning. Mr. Freibert prepares and delivers community education on disaster planning and preparedness at the local

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74 DISPENSING MEDICAL COUNTERMEASURES level. He has also been involved in partnering with numerous public and private agencies in developing community readiness and emergency re- sponse plans, including dispensing of the SNS, pandemic flu prepared- ness, and health and medical response. Mr. Freibert previously worked with the Center for Hazards Research at the University of Louisville, researching, and planning for, the impacts of natural hazard events on populations and the built environment. He earned a Master’s in Urban Planning from the University of Louisville School of Urban and Public Affairs. Donna Garren, Ph.D. (Panel Leader), is the vice president, health and safety regulatory affairs for the National Restaurant Association, head- quartered in Washington, DC. Ms. Garren is a nationally respected food science specialist. Her extensive background and expertise in food sci- ence and nutrition is instrumental in building and enhancing the associa- tion’s proactive efforts in food safety and nutrition, as well as addressing important regulatory and technical issues facing the nation’s 900,000 restaurants. The mission of the Regulatory Affairs Department is to ad- vise and represent the association and its membership on health and safety legislative and regulatory issues impacting the restaurant industry. Topics include public health and sanitation, nutrition food safety, indoor air quality, security, worker protection, building construction, equipment standards, and energy management. Ms. Garren joined the association after 6 years at the United Fresh Fruit & Vegetable Association (United), where she served as vice president, scientific and technical affairs. She was responsible for all produce food safety, food security- and food qual- ity-related issues and activities, science-based regulatory and legislative activities, and technical consultation to United’s membership. Before joining United, Ms. Garren worked for Boskovich Farms, Inc., in Ox- nard, CA, as director of research and development and product safety. Her duties included the development and implementation of produce food safety programs and management of new product research and de- velopment projects. Ms. Garren graduated from Clemson University with a B.S. in Food Science and Nutrition, with a minor in Microbiology. She earned her doctorate in Food Science and Technology from University of Georgia. Noah Glass is founder and CEO of Mobo, Inc., a remote mobile pay- ments firm. Prior to founding Mobo, Glass was expansion manager at Endeavor Global, an innovative entrepreneurship-based international

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75 APPENDIX E development firm. The previous year, Glass worked with Braun Consult- ing, a strategy and technology consulting firm in Boston, where he helped to create an online ordering system for a major pharmaceutical firm. In 2000, Glass joined the Product Manager team at Shutterfly.com, a digital photo printing company, where he co-developed the Shutterfly Express application materials. Mr. Glass graduated from Yale University with a B.A. with distinction in Political Science. Lynn Goldman, M.D., M.P.H. (Planning Committee Member), is a pro- fessor at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences and the De- partment of Health Policy and Management. She is a pediatrician and an epidemiologist who focuses on environmental health policy, public health practice, and children’s environmental health. In 1993, Dr. Gold- man was appointed as assistant administrator for the Environmental Pro- tection Agency’s (EPA’s) Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances, a position she held for more than 5 years. Prior to joining EPA, Dr. Goldman served in several positions at the California Depart- ment of Health Services, most recently as head of the Division of Envi- ronmental and Occupational Disease Control. She has served on numerous boards and expert committees, including the Committee on Environmental Health of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the CDC Lead Poisoning Prevention Advisory Committee, and numerous expert committees for the National Research Council. She is currently vice chair of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences and chair of the IOM Gulf War and Health Study. Dr. Goldman has a B.S. in Conservation of Natural Resources from the Uni- versity of California, Berkeley, an M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins Uni- versity School of Public Health, and an M.D. from the University of California, San Francisco. She completed pediatric training at Children’s Hospital, Oakland, CA. Dan Guinn is the founder and director of compliance of Dispensing So- lutions, Inc. (DSI). DSI is an FDA/DEA registered, state-of-the-art pharmaceutical packaging facility located in Southern California. As the provider of DispenseQuickTM point-of-care pharmaceuticals, DSI pre- packages legend drugs, controlled substances (Schedule II, III, IV and V), vitamins, and nutraceuticals into our unit-of-use bottles. DSI also offer private-label and custom packaging services for oral solids, nutraceuticals, vitamins, antibiotics, injectables, schedule II–IV narcot-

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76 DISPENSING MEDICAL COUNTERMEASURES ics, and more. Mr. Guinn has extensive experience in the packaging and distribution of pharmaceuticals and the implementation of electronic dis- pensing programs, in addition to developing a customizable first re- sponder program that provides state, county, and local agencies with prepackaged, bar-coded medication designed for efficient dispensing under emergency situations. David G. Henry, M.P.A., is a policy analyst at the National Governors Association (NGA) Center for Best Practices. In his role as a policy ana- lyst, Mr. Henry works with the 56 state and territorial state homeland security advisors on matters of homeland security and public health pre- paredness. He has 10 years of progressive experience in nonprofit and government policy with a focus in homeland security and public health preparedness, congressional affairs, and management. Prior to joining NGA, Mr. Henry was a Capital City Fellow for the District of Columbia. He also served as the public health emergency and bioterrorism coordi- nator for the Monroe County (IN) government. Mr. Henry holds an M.P.A. in Local Government Management from Indiana University– Bloomington, and has completed coursework in Emergency Management from FEMA’s Emergency Management Institute. Jack Herrmann, M.S.Ed., N.C.C., L.M.H.C., is the senior advisor for public health preparedness at the National Association of County and City Health Officials, which represents the approximately 3,000 local public health departments across the country. He oversees NACCHO’s preparedness portfolio, which consists of five federally funded programs aimed at enhancing and strengthening the preparedness and response ca- pacity of local health departments. He is responsible for establishing the priorities for public health preparedness within the organization and serves as the organization’s liaison to federal, state, and local partner agencies. Earlier, Mr. Herrmann was assistant professor of psychiatry and director of the Program in Disaster Mental Health at the University of Rochester Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry. During his 17 years with the university, Mr. Herrmann shared a wealth of experience in the fields of disaster mental health, suicide prevention, and employee assistance program (EAP) services. As the founder and former director of Strong EAP, Mr. Herrmann specialized in developing critical response teams for local police, fire, and health care organizations. He has also developed a disaster mental health training curriculum that is required for behavioral health and spiritual care response teams throughout New

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77 APPENDIX E York and Maine. Mr. Herrmann has also been a long-time volunteer with the American Red Cross. Since 1993, he has responded to numerous dis- asters, including the Northridge, CA, earthquake; the explosion of TWA Flight 800 off Long Island; and many hurricanes and floods. He was as- signed as the mental health coordinator for the Family Assistance Center in New York City immediately following the attacks of September 11, 2001, and also assisted the Mayor’s Office in coordinating the first and second year anniversaries of that event. In 2005 he was deployed as the client services administrator for the Hurricane Katrina relief operation (Louisiana), coordinating the health, mental health, and client casework services for the first 2 weeks following that storm. He held the same po- sition a month later in Louisiana following Hurricane Rita. In 2006, Mr. Herrmann traveled to Lexington, KY, as the mental health manager fol- lowing the crash of Comair Flight 5191. Mr. Herrmann earned a Mas- ter’s in Education from the University of Rochester, is certified by the National Board of Certified Counselors, and is a licensed mental health counselor in the state of New York. Christopher Hetherington, J.D., is the global crisis management officer for Citigroup’s Office of Business Continuity. A senior vice president, he started with Citi in June 2006, after more than 2 years serving as the chief of staff for the New York City Police Pension Fund. While working for the fund, he initiated and directed business continuity and disaster recovery strategies, including the establishment of a “hot” site in one of the city’s outer boroughs. Mr. Hetherington was a New York City police officer, supervisor, and executive corps member for more than 23 years, retiring in the rank of deputy inspector. For the last 2 years of his police department career, Mr. Hetherington served as deputy commissioner for homeland security in the city’s Office of Emergency Management. He holds a Bachelor’s from the University of Rochester, a Master’s from the Naval Postgraduate School, and a J.D. from St. John’s University School of Law. Christopher Hoff is the emergency response coordinator for the Kane County Health Department in Aurora, IL. He directs planning, exercise, and response efforts for Kane County. Mr. Hoff also works on the na- tional level with the NACCHO Pandemic Influenza Workgroup and on an ASTHO project to develop new guidance on pandemic preparedness with at-risk populations. Mr. Hoff has a Bachelor’s in Biomedical Sci-

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102 DISPENSING MEDICAL COUNTERMEASURES executive director of the Coast Guard's transition into the Department of Homeland Security, and director of operations capability and director of operations policy. Mr. Johnson received a B.S. degree at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in 1975. He earned an M.S. degree at the Naval Post- graduate School in 1983, and an M.S. degree in management at the Sloan School of Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1993. Jerry Johnston, B.A., REMT-P, is the emergency services (EMS) di- rector at Henry County Health Center (HCHC) in Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, a countywide all-ALS system. In addition to his duties in Henry County, he also manages a BLS/ALS/Critical Care transport service located in Burlington, Iowa, which is partly owned by HCHC. In 1998, HCHC EMS was the recipient of NAEMT’s Paramedic Ambulance Service of the Year award. In 2001, he was the recipient of NAEMT's William Klingensmith EMS Administrator of the Year award. He has been em- ployed by private as well as hospital based EMS systems. While his cur- rent role is that of administrator, he has held positions of EMT-B, EMT- I, staff paramedic, training officer, EMT-B training program and continu- ing education coordinator, and paramedic instructor. He has instructed all levels of EMS providers, as well as BLS, ACLS, and PALS. Mr. Johns- ton serves on a variety of local, state, and national organizations and as- sociations. He has presented at numerous regional, state and national EMS conferences. He is currently president of the National Association of EMTs, an organization in which he has served on the Board of Gover- nors, Executive Council, and Board of Directors, and as treasurer and president elect. He is a past president of the Iowa EMS Association, was the first chair of NAEMT’s Pediatric Prehospital Care Executive Coun- cil, and is a past BLS national faculty member for the American Hospital Association. Mr. Johnston holds a B.A. degree in business management and economics, and is a nationally registered paramedic. Robert Kadlec, M.D., M.T.M.&H., M.A., is the special assistant to the President for homeland security and senior director for biological de- fense policy in the White House Homeland Security Council. Prior to his appointment, he was the director for Biodefense and Public Health at PRTM Management Consultants. Previously, he served as staff director for the Senate Subcommittee on Bioterrorism and Public Health, where he oversaw the drafting of the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Act (PL 109-417). The law, signed by President Bush on December 19,

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103 APPENDIX E 2006, improves the functioning of Project BioShield of 2004 and reau- thorizes the Bioterrorism Preparedness Act of 2002. Before that, he served as director for BioDefense Preparedness and Response at the White House Homeland Security Council from February 2002 until March 2005, where he was responsible for coordinating medical issues pertaining to the threat of bioterrorism with the National Security Coun- cil and the Federal Interagency. He conducted the BioDefense End-to- End Assessment and was instrumental in drafting Homeland Security Presidential Directive 10, The National BioDefense Policy for the 21st Century. In his military career, he was assigned to the Joint Special Op- erations Command at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, and the 16th Special Operations Wing at Hurlburt Field, Florida. He also served in senior ad- visory roles in the Office of the Secretary of Defense for Policy and the Central Intelligence Agency. Dr. Kadlec holds an M.D. and an M.T.M.&H. (tropical medicine and hygiene) from the Uniformed Ser- vices University of the Health Sciences; an M.A. in national security studies from Georgetown University; and a B.S. from the United States Air Force Academy. He is board certified in Aerospace and Preventive Medicine. He is a graduate of the Air War College. Lynne Kidder, (Workshop Co-Chair) see Speaker bio. Jon R. Krohmer, M.D., F.A.C.E.P., see Planning Committee bio. Michael G. Kurilla, M.D., Ph.D. is the director of the Office of Biode- fense Research Affairs and associate director for Biodefense Product Development for the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Dis- eases (NIAID). His primary role is to provide overall institute coordina- tion for product development of medical countermeasures against bioterror threats. At the University of Virginia, he was an assistant pro- fessor of pathology as well as co-director of the Laboratory of Molecular Diagnostics and associate director for clinical microbiology. Dr. Kurilla moved to the private sector working in anti-infective drug development at Dupont Pharmaceuticals, Bristol-Myers Squibb, and Wyeth. He sub- sequently joined NIAID as a medical officer. In 2005, he was named to his current positions within NIAID. He received his undergraduate de- gree in chemistry from the California Institute of Technology. He earned his M.D.-Ph.D. from Duke University. Dr. Kurilla took his postgraduate medical training in pathology at the Brigham & Women’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, and a postdoctoral fellowship with Dr. Elliott

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104 DISPENSING MEDICAL COUNTERMEASURES Kieff at Harvard Medical School as a Life Sciences Research Foundation fellow, followed by a Markey Scholar Award. Patrick Libbey is the executive director of the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO), the national voice of local public health serving nearly 3,000 local public health agencies nation- wide. Under his leadership, NACCHO works to support efforts that pro- tect and improve the health of all people and communities by promoting national policy, developing resources and programs, seeking health eq- uity, and supporting effective local public health practice and systems. Most notably, he is recognized for his work in the development of per- formance standards for public health practice. Prior to joining NACCHO in September 2002, he was the director of the Thurston County Public Health and Social Services Department in Olympia, Washington. The department includes divisions of personal health and environmental health, as well as assessment, planning, and epidemiology; and social services, including mental health, substance abuse, and developmental disabilities. For more than 20 years, Mr. Libbey was responsible for a mixed urban, suburban, and rural population of 210,000, supervised 115 employees, and managed a budget in excess of $30 million. He currently serves on the National Association of Counties Homeland Security Task Force. In 1993, he received NACCHO’s Award for Excellence in Envi- ronmental Health and was a co-recipient of the First Annual Jim Parker Memorial Award for Washington State's systematic incorporation of core functions in its public health system. In 2002, he again was a co-recipient of the Jim Parker Memorial Award for work in developing Washington State's public health performance measurements. Jayne Lux, M.S., See speaker bio. Margaret M. McMahon, R.N., M.N., C.E.N., F.A.E.N., is the emer- gency clinical nurse specialist at AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center - Mainland campus, in Pomona, New Jersey, former editor of Disaster Management & Response journal, and currently a Senior Clinical Editor for the Journal of Emergency Nursing. Ms. McMahon served on active duty and the reserves in the U.S. Army Nurse Corps, retiring as a Lieu- tenant Colonel. During her military career she served in a variety of posi- tions, including Chief Nurse of a Neuro KE Team, Training Officer, Nuclear, Biological, & Chemical Defense Officer, and Assistant Nurse Manager – Receiving & Emergency, Da Nang, South Vietnam. Ms.

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105 APPENDIX E McMahon is a long time member of the Emergency Nurses Association, and served as National ENA President in 1987. She has over 40 years of professional nursing experience in clinical, administrative, and educa- tional roles and has lectured and published extensively on disaster and emergency care topics. Ms. McMahon received her nursing diploma from Philadelphia General Hospital School of Nursing, her B.S. in Nurs- ing from the University of Pennsylvania, and her Master of Nursing from the University of Washington. She is board certified in Emergency Nurs- ing, a member of Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Honorary, and a fellow of the Academy of Emergency Nursing. Judith A. Monroe, M.D., is chair of the Association of State and Terri- torial Health Officials (ASTHO) and vice chair of the ASTHO National Preparedness Policy Committee. In December 2006, she traveled to Is- rael with a delegation from ASTHO for preparedness training with the first international delegation in the history of ASTHO and the start of an ongoing exchange with that country. She was appointed in March 2005 by Governor Daniels as the Indiana state health commissioner and medi- cal director of Medicaid, and is a member of the National Governors As- sociation Health Care Practice Task Force and Center for Best Practices Healthy Communities Work Group. She is a family physician at St. Vin- cent Hospital, whose medical staff she joined in 1992, serving as director of the Family Medicine Residency Program and the Primary Care Center until 2005. Dr. Monroe was clinical director with the Department of Family Medicine at Indiana University School of Medicine from 1990 to 1992. From 1986–1990 she also served in the National Health Service Corps, providing health care in rural Appalachia, during which she was featured with former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop in a documentary on the heath care crisis in America. She is chair of the Executive Board of Indiana Tobacco Prevention and Cessation, and a member of the Boards of Indiana Health and Information Exchange, Area Health Educa- tion Cooperative, and Reach Out and Read. Dr. Monroe received her un- dergraduate degree from Eastern Kentucky University and is a graduate of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. She did her post- graduate training at the University of Cincinnati, and is a fellow of the American Academy of Family Practice. Erin Mullen, R.Ph., Ph.D., see Speaker bio.

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106 DISPENSING MEDICAL COUNTERMEASURES Tara O’Toole, M.D., M.P.H., is CEO and director of the Center for Biosecurity at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), and professor of medicine and of public health at the University of Pitts- burgh. UPMC’s Center for Biosecurity is an independent organization dedicated to improving the country’s resilience to major biological threats. Prior to founding the center in 2003, Dr. O’Toole was one of the original members of the Johns Hopkins Center for Civilian Biodefense Strategies and served as its director from 2001 to 2003. She has served on numerous government and expert advisory committees dealing with biodefense. In 2004, she was elected Chair of the Board of the Federation of American Scientists, and in 2006 she was appointed to the Board of the Google Foundation’s International Networked System for Total Early Disease Detection. From 1993 to 1997, Dr. O’Toole served as assistant secretary for Environment Safety and Health at the Department of En- ergy. Prior to that, she was a senior analyst at the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment, where she directed studies of the health im- pact of pollution resulting from nuclear weapons production, among other projects. Dr. O’Toole practiced general internal medicine in com- munity health centers in Baltimore from 1984 to 1988. She is board certi- fied in internal medicine and in occupational and environmental health. She has a bachelor's degree from Vassar College, an M.D. from the George Washington University, and an M.P.H. from Johns Hopkins Uni- versity. She completed internal medicine residency training at Yale and a fellowship in Occupational and Environmental Medicine at Johns Hop- kins University. At the National Academies, Dr. O’Toole served on the Working Group on Biological Weapons Control, and is currently serving on the Committee on Technical and Privacy Dimensions of Information for Terrorism Prevention and Other National Goals. Gerald W. Parker, D.V.M., Ph.D., M.S., see Speaker bio. Sally Phillips, R.N., Ph.D., joined the staff of CP3 in September 2001 as a Senior Nurse Scholar. She managed a portfolio that ranged from her primary area of bioterrorism to multidisciplinary education for safety and related health care workforce initiatives. Prior to joining the AHRQ staff, Dr. Phillips was a Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellow and Health Policy Analyst for Senator Tom Harkin for 2 years. She brought a wealth of expertise in the area of multidisciplinary education, patient safety legislative initiatives, and curriculum with health professions edu- cation to her role at AHRQ. Dr. Phillips joined the AHRQ staff in Sep-

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107 APPENDIX E tember 2002 as the Director of the Bioterrorism Preparedness Research Program, now the Public Health Emergency Preparedness Program. She is an accomplished author, consultant, and speaker on public health and medical preparedness and response research initiatives. Dr. Phillips holds a Ph.D. from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. Steven J. Phillips, M.D., has served as deputy director for research and education at NLM/NIH since 1999. He is also the principal advisor to the chairman for medical affairs at Global Security Institute. In 2002, he be- came a founder and the chief medical officer of Cardiovascular Hospitals of America, LLC. He retired from that position in 2001, but remains an NIH contractor. He has been the principal investigator for numerous re- search projects. Dr. Phillips has enjoyed a highly successful career as a board certified general and thoracic surgeon, and is a business entrepre- neur who has established several important programs and laboratories, and has been granted six patents. He established a cardiac surgery pro- gram at the University of Oregon to Des Moines, Iowa, which today is the Iowa Heart Center, a private medical group with a highly profitable business that has grown to more than 55 physicians and 300 employees specializing in cardiovascular disease. He developed a funded cardiovas- cular research laboratory at the College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University. During the past 30 years, his team has implanted the first artificial heart in Iowa, performed the first heart transplant in central Iowa, and invented the technology for percutaneous cardiopulmonary bypass. Dr. Phillips received the Governor of Iowa Science Medal for his scientific efforts and he served as the national science advisor to the Iowa Department of Health. He retired from active medical practice in 2005, but he has active medical licenses in Iowa and Colorado. He is a graduate of Hobart College and Tufts University School of Medicine. Jeffrey W. Runge, M.D., is the first assistant secretary for the DHS Of- fice of Health Affairs. He is also the department’s first chief medical of- ficer, for which he serves as the principal advisor to the secretary for public health and medical issues across the department. He is board certi- fied in emergency medicine and holds the title of clinical professor of emergency medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. At DHS, he is responsible for coordination with other federal departments and agencies and the Homeland Security Council on issues of biodefense and medical preparedness. From March to August 2006, Dr. Runge served as the acting under secretary for the DHS Science and Technol-

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108 DISPENSING MEDICAL COUNTERMEASURES ogy Directorate. In 2001, he was appointed by President Bush as the twelfth administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Admini- stration, the federal agency responsible for the nation’s highway and ve- hicle safety programs. Prior to this, he practiced and taught emergency medicine as assistant chairman of the Department of Emergency Medi- cine at Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte. He was also the director of the Carolinas Center for Injury Prevention and Control, where he spear- headed injury prevention initiatives that were national in scope. His aca- demic interest is in the field of trauma care and injury prevention. Dr. Runge earned his B.A. (magna cum laude) in 1977 from the University of the South, Sewanee, Tennessee, and received his M.D. degree from the Medical University of South Carolina in 1981. Phillip Schneider, see Planning Committee bio. Roslyne Schulman, M.H.A., M.B.A., has been a senior associate direc- tor for policy development at AHA since January 1999. In this capacity, she is responsible for policy development related to hospital prepared- ness for disasters. She is the co-lead of the AHA’s staff team for hospital readiness and helps to lead AHA’s efforts in this area. Ms. Schulman is AHA’s liaison to CDC’s Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee. In addition, she has primary policy development responsibil- ity in a number of other areas, including the Emergency Medical Treat- ment and Active Labor Act; Medicare hospital outpatient, physician, and ambulatory surgical center payment policy, and other Medicare Part B issues; Medicare contracting reform; rural health clinic issues; FDA pol- icy issues regarding drugs, blood and devices; and other areas. Recently, she was principal investigator for AHA’s federal contract with the Health Resources and Services Administration on hospital implementation is- sues and solutions on Emergency Systems for Advanced Registration for Volunteer Healthcare Professionals, and served as an ex-officio member of the Hospital Incident Command System National Working Group. From 1992–1999, she worked for the American College of Emergency Physicians as regulatory representative, and from 1990–1992, she was a legislative assistant with the American Group Practice Association. Ms. Schulman received her M.H.A. and M.B.A. from the University of Pitts- burgh in 1989, and her B.S. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1984. Linda J. Stierle, M.S.N., R.N., C.N.A.A., B.C., is chief executive offi- cer of the American Nurses Association (ANA) and the American Nurses

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109 APPENDIX E Foundation. In this capacity, she develops and implements programs de- signed to meet the vision and goals of the association. She was instru- mental in the creation of ANA’s newest constituency for nurses in the uniformed services, the Federal Nurses Association (FedNA). In 2002, President Bush appointed her to a 5-year term on the Board of Regents of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, on which she currently serves as vice-chair. She was a long-time member of the Texas Nurses Association until February 2000. Ms. Stierle retired as a brigadier general in the U.S. Air Force Nurse Corps. She began her military career in 1970 as a staff nurse in intensive care. During her career, she held various clinical and management positions, including chief nursing offi- cer at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas, the Air Force’s largest medical center (1,000 beds) and at the 48th Tactical Fighter Wing Hospital, Royal Air Force, in Lakenheath, England. Ms. Stierle has both regional and national headquarters corporate experience. From 1995 until her retirement in 2000, she was assigned to Bolling Air Force Base, Washington, DC, as director, medical readiness, and was the twelfth Chief of the U.S. Air Force Nurse Corps. She is a member of the con- sumer advisory board of the American Academy of Family Physicians. She earned her M.S. in nursing from the University of California, San Francisco; her B.S. in nursing from Incarnate Word College, San Anto- nio, Texas; and a diploma in nursing from Spartanburg General Hospital in Spartanburg, South Carolina. Margaret VanAmringe, M.H.S., is vice president for Public Policy and Government Relations at the Joint Commission, and heads the Joint Commission’s Washington, DC, office. She is responsible for developing strategic opportunities for The Joint Commission in both the public and private sectors. To accomplish this, Ms. VanAmringe works with health care professional organizations, government agencies, the Congress, con- sumer organizations and large purchasers of health care. The Washington office is office is the Joint Commission’s interface with the federal gov- ernment and with public policy issues, such as patient safety, building a national health information infrastructure, emergency preparedness, and quality of care. It is also the office concerned with Medicare and Medi- caid oversight of quality and its relationship to private sector accredita- tion; relationships with the Department of Defense; the Veterans’ Administration; and the Public Health Service agencies. Prior to taking a position with the Joint Commission, Ms. VanAmringe was director for research and dissemination and liaison at the Agency for Health Care

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110 DISPENSING MEDICAL COUNTERMEASURES Policy and Research (now the Agency for Health Research and Quality) in the U.S. Public Health Service. There she established programs to communicate health services research findings to a wide array of profes- sional and public audiences. She established the agency’s first health in- formation dissemination program to bring practical information gleaned from health services research into the hands of consumers and their fami- lies, and to have more health services research information indexed into the National Library of Medicine. She also established an external grants program to explore effective methods for disseminating new medical information to physicians, and for changing medical treatment behavior to reflect evidence-based medicine. Between 1989 and 1990, Ms. Va- nAmringe was a legislative fellow in the office of the majority leader, Senator George Mitchell. From early 1987 through 1989, she held vari- ous positions in the Immediate Office of the Secretary, Department of Health and Human Services, including senior advisor, and acting deputy chief of staff. While there, she provided advice on the full range of social and health policy issues. Before joining the secretary’s staff, she spent ten years working in the Health Care Financing Administration (now CMS), HHS, where she was Director of the Office of Survey and Certifi- cation, the component which was then responsible for developing health and safety standards for health care organizations reimbursed by Medi- care/Medicaid, and for assuring that such federally funded entities met the government’s expectations for delivering quality care. She also worked in the contractor oversight division that dealt with payment op- erations. Ms. VanAmringe holds a Master of Health Sciences degree from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. Theresa L. Wiegmann, J.D., is director of public policy and special counsel for the AABB (formerly known as the American Association of Blood Banks). She represents AABB before Congressional offices and federal agencies, where she advocates the interests of the transfusion medicine and cellular therapy communities on a variety of public health issues, including blood safety and availability, Medicare inpatient and outpatient reimbursement, patient safety initiatives, and disaster prepar- edness. Prior to joining the AABB in 1998, she practiced in a Washing- ton, DC, law firm specializing in Food and Drug law and health-related legislative and regulatory matters. Ms. Wiegmann received her bache- lor’s degree from Duke University and her law degree from George Washington University.

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111 APPENDIX E IOM STAFF Bruce M. Altevogt, Ph.D., is a senior program officer on the Board on Health Sciences Policy at the IOM. His primary interests focus on policy issues related to basic research and preparedness for catastrophic events. He received his doctorate from Harvard University’s Program in Neuro- science. Following more than 10 years of research, Dr. Altevogt joined The National Academies as a science and technology policy fellow with the Christine Mirzayan Science & Technology Policy Graduate Fellow- ship Program. Since joining the Board on Health Sciences Policy, he has been a program officer on multiple IOM studies, including Sleep Disor- ders and Sleep Deprivation: An Unmet Public Health Problem, The Na- tional Academies’ Guidelines for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research: 2007 Amendments, and Research Priorities in Emergency Preparedness and Response for Public Health Systems. He is currently serving as director of the Forum on Medical and Public Health Prepared- ness for Catastrophic Events, the Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders Forum, and as a co-study director on the National Academy of Sciences Human Embryonic Stem Cells Research Advisory Committee. He received his B.A. from the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, where he majored in biology and minored in South Asian studies. Andrew M. Pope, Ph.D., is the director of the Board on Health Sciences Policy at the IOM. With a Ph.D. in physiology and biochemistry, his primary interests are in science policy, biomedical ethics, and the envi- ronmental and occupational influences on human health. During his ten- ure at The National Academies and since 1989 at the IOM, Dr. Pope has directed numerous studies on topics that range from injury control, dis- ability prevention, and biologic markers to the protection of human sub- jects of research, National Institutes of Health (NIH) priority-setting processes, organ procurement and transplantation policy, and the role of science and technology in countering terrorism. Dr. Pope is the recipient of the National Academy of Sciences President’s Special Achievement Award and the IOM’s Cecil Award. Marnina Kammersell, M.A., is a research associate at the Board on Health Sciences Policy. In addition to her work with the Forum on Medi- cal and Public Health Preparedness for Catastrophic Events, she is cur- rently assisting with the IOM’s review of the Title X Family Planning Program. Prior to joining the IOM, she was a health science policy ana-

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112 DISPENSING MEDICAL COUNTERMEASURES lyst at the NIH Clinical Research Policy Analysis and Coordination pro- gram within the Office of Biotechnology Activities. Her work at NIH focused on the ethics, policy, and regulation of clinical trials. Ms. Kam- mersell previously spent time as a research assistant at The George Washington University’s Center for International Science and Technol- ogy Policy, and she also served as a legislative intern for the House of Representatives, Committee on Science. She was a 2005 Christine Mir- zayan Fellow at The National Academies, where she worked on the Ris- ing Above the Gathering Storm report. She holds an M.A. in Public Policy with a focus on health policy from The George Washington Uni- versity and a B.A. in Philosophy from the University of Michigan. Alex Repace is a senior project assistant on the Board on Health Sci- ences Policy. Currently, he is supporting the Roundtable on Translating Genomic-Based Research for Health. Previously, he worked for the Board on Army Science and Technology for the National Research Council. He also has experience in research grants administration in the areas of biological and physical sciences. Mr. Repace has a B.S. in Mi- crobiology from University of Maryland at College Park and training and experience in public health. Heather Kaiser is pursuing her Master of Public Health with a focus on health policy and public health preparedness from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She is currently serving as a Board on Health Sciences Policy intern at the IOM to work on preparedness activities. She is also a medical student at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, and she will fulfill the remainder of her M.D. re- quirements on completion of her M.P.H. With increased exposure to medicine on a broader perspective while pursuing her M.P.H., Ms. Kai- ser has continued to grow more ardent in her desire to contribute to fur- thering the practice of clinical medicine in the context of population- based research and policy formulation. In particular, she has developed an appreciation and inquisitiveness for improving health beyond individ- ual patient encounters through preventive and protective measures.