Appendix B
Committee Biographical Information

PAUL K. BARTEN, Chair, is Associate Professor of Forest Resources at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He also serves as Co-Director of the USDA Forest Service-University of Massachusetts Watershed Exchange and Technology Partnership. He was a Bullard Fellow in Forest Research at the Harvard Forest (2003-04) while on sabbatical leave. He was a faculty member in the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies at Yale University from 1988 to 1997. Dr. Barten earned a Ph.D. (1988) and M.S. (1985) in forest hydrology and watershed management at the University of Minnesota; he has undergraduate degrees in forestry from the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (B.S. 1983) and the New York State Ranger School at Wanakena (A.A.S. 1977). Dr. Barten teaches an undergraduate course in forest conservation and graduate courses in forest and wetland hydrology and forest resources management. His research and outreach work focuses on forest hydrology, watershed modeling, and watershed management in the northeastern United States. He was a member of the NRC Committee to Review New York City's Watershed Management Strategy (1997-2000) and the NRC Committee on Conservation of Atlantic Salmon in Maine (2001-04). He also serves on the Research Planning Committee of the Sustainable Forest Management Network in Canada, as chairman of the Massachusetts Forestry Committee, and as a member of the Board of Trustees of the Great Mountain Forest in northwestern Connecticut.


JULIA A. JONES, Vice-Chair, is professor at the Department of Geosciences, Oregon State University. Prior to coming to OSU in 1991 she was tenured faculty at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her research addresses human land use and natural disturbance effects on fluxes of water, sediment, wood, and exotic plant propagulates in managed forest landscapes, using long-term records and novel analytic approaches. Dr. Jones the director of the Ecosystem Informatics IGERT and strategic initiative at Oregon State University, co-investigator on the H.J. Andrews Long-Term Ecological Research program, and Director of the Geography Program at Oregon State University. She received a B.A. in economic development from Hampshire College; an M.A. in international relations from the Johns Hopkins School for Advanced International Studies, and a Ph.D. in geography/environmental engineering from The Johns Hopkins University.


GAIL L. ACHTERMAN directs the Institute for Natural Resources at Oregon State University. Her research interest focuses on use of scientific information in public policy making, collaborative decision processes and community water planning. She is an adjunct professor of forest resources and a member of the



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Appendix B Committee Biographical Information PAUL K. BARTEN, Chair, is Associate Professor of Forest Resources at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He also serves as Co-Director of the USDA Forest Service-University of Massachusetts Watershed Exchange and Technology Partnership. He was a Bullard Fellow in Forest Research at the Harvard Forest (2003-04) while on sabbatical leave. He was a faculty member in the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies at Yale University from 1988 to 1997. Dr. Barten earned a Ph.D. (1988) and M.S. (1985) in forest hy- drology and watershed management at the University of Minnesota; he has un- dergraduate degrees in forestry from the SUNY College of Environmental Sci- ence and Forestry (B.S. 1983) and the New York State Ranger School at Wanakena (A.A.S. 1977). Dr. Barten teaches an undergraduate course in forest conservation and graduate courses in forest and wetland hydrology and forest resources management. His research and outreach work focuses on forest hy- drology, watershed modeling, and watershed management in the northeastern United States. He was a member of the NRC Committee to Review New York City's Watershed Management Strategy (1997-2000) and the NRC Committee on Conservation of Atlantic Salmon in Maine (2001-04). He also serves on the Research Planning Committee of the Sustainable Forest Management Network in Canada, as chairman of the Massachusetts Forestry Committee, and as a member of the Board of Trustees of the Great Mountain Forest in northwestern Connecticut. JULIA A. JONES, Vice-Chair, is professor at the Department of Geosciences, Oregon State University. Prior to coming to OSU in 1991 she was tenured fac- ulty at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her research addresses hu- man land use and natural disturbance effects on fluxes of water, sediment, wood, and exotic plant propagulates in managed forest landscapes, using long-term records and novel analytic approaches. Dr. Jones the director of the Ecosystem Informatics IGERT and strategic initiative at Oregon State University, co- investigator on the H.J. Andrews Long-Term Ecological Research program, and Director of the Geography Program at Oregon State University. She received a B.A. in economic development from Hampshire College; an M.A. in interna- tional relations from the Johns Hopkins School for Advanced International Stud- ies, and a Ph.D. in geography/environmental engineering from The Johns Hop- kins University. GAIL L. ACHTERMAN directs the Institute for Natural Resources at Oregon State University. Her research interest focuses on use of scientific information in public policy making, collaborative decision processes and community water planning. She is an adjunct professor of forest resources and a member of the 163

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164 APPENDIX B graduate water faculty. Prior to coming to the university, she worked as an at- torney in the Solicitor’s Office of the U.S. Department of the Interior in Wash- ington, D.C. where she advised the Bureau of Land Management and the Bureau of Reclamation from 1975-1978. Upon returning to Oregon she joined what later became the Stoel Rives law firm in Portland, where she helped build the North- west’s first specialty natural resource and environmental law practice. She also started her civic work by serving on the Oregon Water Policy Review Board from 1981-1985. In 1987, she became assistant to the governor for natural re- sources. In that position, she was responsible for natural resource, energy and environmental policy development and implementation, and worked closely with all state resource agencies. She also served as the main liaison with federal resource agencies, including extensive work on plans for Oregon’s national for- ests. She returned to private law practice at Stoel Rives until 2000 when she became Executive Director of the Deschutes Resources Conservancy in Bend, Oregon, working on developing voluntary, market-based watershed restoration methods. She received her A.B. in economics with honors from Stanford Uni- versity; an M.S. in natural resources policy and management, University of Michigan and a J.D. cum laude from the University of Michigan. KENNETH N. BROOKS is professor of forest hydrology and watershed man- agement in the Department of Forest Resources, College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences, University of Minnesota. Following five years with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, including two years with the Hydro- logic Engineering Center, he joined the faculty of the Department of Forest Re- sources in 1975. During his tenure with the University, he has taught courses in forest and wetland hydrology, watershed management, agroforestry, and range management. His research has focused on forest hydrology, wetland hydrology, hydrologic modeling, and methods of evaluating/appraising watershed manage- ment practices. He is a professional hydrologist, certified by the American Insti- tute of Hydrology (AIH), and has served as the Chair of the Board of Registra- tion of AIH from 1997-2003. He was a Fullbright Lecturer from 1997-1998 in Taiwan, and served as a Fellow, East-West Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, from 1984-1985. He received a B.S. in range science-watershed management from Utah State University and an M.S. and Ph.D. in watershed management from the University of Arizona. IRENA F. CREED is a professor in the Department of Biology and in the Graduate Program in Environmental Sciences at the University of Western On- tario. She is the founder and leader of the Catchment Research Facility (CRF), an advanced monitoring, analytical and modeling facility established for the analysis of catchment processes. Her research interests are in the areas of ecol- ogy, hydrology, biogeochemistry, geographic information systems, remote sens- ing, and simulation modeling. Specifically, Dr. Creed investigates the dominant factors regulating energy, water, and nutrient processes and pathways within specific watersheds in a range of forest regions and biomes.

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APPENDIX B 165 PETER F. FFOLLIOTT is professor at the School of Natural Resources and Arid Lands Resource Studies, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, and the Laboratory for Tree-Ring Research, College of Science, University of Arizona. His research involves areas such as watershed, forest, and range and wildlife management, agroforestry, mensuration and inventory techniques, economic assessments and evaluations, ecosystem modeling and simulation, environ- mental and natural resources policies. Prior to coming to the University of Ari- zona in 1970, he was a Research Forester with the USDA Forest Service, Flag- staff, Arizona. Dr. Ffolliott teaches and conducts research programs in support of water resources, watershed, and other natural resources management. He is a Fellow of the Society of American Foresters, the Indian Association of Hy- drologists, and the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, and a member of other many other professional and honorary societies. He received a B.S. and M.S. in forest management from the University of Minnesota; and a Ph.D. in watershed management and water resources administration from the University of Arizona. ANNE HAIRSTON-STRANG has been a forest hydrologist with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources Forest Service in Annapolis, MD since 1997. She heads the Forest Watershed Management Program, which includes water- shed forest restoration and streamside buffer establishment. Her current projects include forest management plan development for Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission forest lands around two drinking water reservoirs, riparian forest buffer monitoring, harvesting BMP assessment, and state coordination with the Chesapeake Bay Program Forestry Work Group. Hairston-Strang received a B.S. in forest management from Virginia Tech; an M.S. in forest soils from University of Minnesota, and a Ph.D. from Oregon State University in forest hydrology. MICHAEL C. KAVANAUGH is a chemical and environmental engineer, con- sulting professor at Stanford University, and vice president of Malcolm Pirnie, Inc. His research interests are hazardous waste management, soil and ground- water remediation, process engineering, industrial waste treatment, technology evaluations, strategic environmental management, compliance and due diligence auditing, water quality, water and wastewater treatment, and water reuse. He has served as chair to the National Research Council's (NRC) Board on Radioac- tive Waste Management and the Water Science and Technology Board. He has also chaired the NRC Committee on Ground Water Cleanup Alternatives. Dr. Kavanaugh is a registered chemical engineer in California and Utah, a Diplomat (DEE) of the American Academy of Environmental Engineers, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He received his B.S. in chemical engi- neering from Stanford University and his M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. LEE MACDONALD is a professor in the Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Watershed Stewardship at Colorado State University. His general field of

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166 APPENDIX B interest is land use hydrology, broadly defined as the effects of changes in land use on the quantity, timing and quality of runoff. His earlier work focused on hillslope hydrology and the effects of forest management on runoff, and more recently he has been emphasizing the effects of unpaved forest roads and fires on erosion. His process-based work at the hillslope scale has been coupled with studies on hillslope stream-connectivity, and the extent to which these upstream changes can induce downstream cumulative effects. He has a continuing inter- est in watershed-scale monitoring, our ability to detect significant change, and how this may affect our ability to apply the principles of adaptive management at the watershed scale. His degrees include a B.A. in human biology from Stan- ford University; an M.S. in resource ecology from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; and a Ph.D. in wildland resource science from the University of California at Berkeley. RONALD C. SMITH is the managing forester at Tuskegee University, where he is a teaching faculty member; oversees the management of the University’s land holdings; and serves as Director for Forestry and Natural Resources at the Small Farm Rural Economic Development Center. In his faculty position in the College of Agricultural, Environmental and Natural Sciences, he teaches den- drology (tree identification and silvics) and industrial forestry in the Department of Agriculture and Natural Sciences, and runs the extension forestry and farming programs through the University. He also works with students and other forest- ers through the Alabama Consortium of Forestry Education and Research on a range of research projects that include valuation of non-timber benefits of dif- ferent forest ecosystem management strategies, the impact of site preparation on timber and non-timber values, wetland function and ecosystem services, and other topics related to forested systems. Smith was a forester for the USFS from 1979 to 2001 and spent many of those USFS years as an adjunct faculty member at Tuskegee teaching students the trade of forestry. He received his degree in forest management science. DANIEL B. TINKER is an assistant professor at the University of Wyoming. His research is conducted in the Greater Yellowstone-Teton Ecosystem in northwestern Wyoming, and involves ecosystem responses to large, natural dis- turbances such as fire. Dr. Tinker uses GIS and remote sensing to investigate the consequences of landscape-scale spatial heterogeneity in ecological systems. His current work is focused on understanding how the observed variation in post-fire plant communities in the Greater Yellowstone-Teton Ecosystem affects important ecosystem processes such as decomposition and nitrogen mineraliza- tion, how these processes vary at the landscape scale, and how the effects of post-fire community structure change over time in young, developing forests. He received his B.S. from Fort Lewis College, and M.S. and Ph.D. from Univer- sity of Wyoming.

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APPENDIX B 167 SUZANNE BIRMINGHAM WALKER is Vice President and for- ester/biologist of Azimuth Forestry Services, Inc., manages non-industrial pri- vate forestland and provides biological consulting for private land holders in east Texas and western Louisiana. She also produces biological evaluations and environmental assessments for government agencies and privately held compa- nies, wetland delineations, botanical surveys under cooperative agreements, and species checklists of the flora of the Big Thicket National Preserve with Rice University. Prior to Azimuth, she was in the timber industry as a technical car- tographer and as a procurement forester in the 1980s, and spent eight years as a federal forester and ecologist with the U. S. Forest Service, where she conducted environmental assessments, timber prescriptions, and biological evaluations for threatened and endangered species and management of wildland fire. She has served as member for the State of Texas Prescribed Burning Board since 1999. Ms. Walker received her bachelors in forestry and biology from Stephen F. Aus- tin State University. BEVERLEY C. WEMPLE is an associate professor of Geography and Geol- ogy at the University of Vermont. Her research interests lie in understanding the dynamics of hydrologic and geomorphic processes in upland, forested water- sheds. She is particularly interested in using basic theoretical tools and simula- tion modeling, in conjunction with empirical field studies, to understand how management of forested, mountain landscapes alters the processes of runoff generation and sediment production. Dr. Wemple is a cooperator with the Long- term Ecological Research network, the Northeastern Ecosystem Research Coop- erative, and the Vermont Monitoring Cooperative. She received her B.A. from the University of Richmond, and her M.S. and Ph.D. from Oregon State Univer- sity. GEORGE H. WEYERHAEUSER, JR. is elected senior vice president of technology in Weyerhaeuser Company. Since 1978, he has held various posi- tions, including technical forester, contract logger administrator, sawmill super- visor, and vice president and mill manager for containerboard. In 1990 Weyer- haeuser moved to the company’s headquarters to become Vice President, Manu- facturing for Weyerhaeuser cellulose fibers and paper businesses. He served as president and chief executive officer of Weyerhaeuser Canada Ltd. from 1993- 1998. Weyerhaeuser currently serves as a director of Clearwater Management Company and president of the Thea Foss Waterway Public Development Au- thority. He is also a board member of the Institute of Paper & Science Technol- ogy (IPST) and the Museum of Glass: International Center for Contemporary Art. He received his B.A. in philosophy/mathematics from Yale University and his M.S. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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