Appendix B
Bibliographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

Hal Stern (Chair) is a professor and founding chair of statistics at the University of California at Irvine. Prior to joining the Irvine faculty in 2002, he held academic appointments at Iowa State University and Harvard University. An expert in Bayesian modeling and techniques, he is coauthor of Bayesian Data Analysis. A fellow of the American Statistical Association (ASA), he has served as editor of the association’s magazine, Chance, and as chair of the association’s section on Bayesian science and the section on statistics in sports. He has M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University.


Dan A. Black is a professor at the Harris School of the University of Chicago. His research interests are labor economics, applied econometrics, and program evaluation. He has been a visiting professor of economics at the H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management at Carnegie Mellon University. He has used the National Survey of College Graduates data in his research. He received B.A. and M.A. degrees in history from the University of Kansas, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Purdue University.


Chester (Chet) Bowie is a senior vice president at the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) at the University of Chicago. He is a survey statistician with more than 30 years experience designing and conducting cross-sectional and longitudinal household, educational institution, and business surveys for federal and state governments and academic



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Appendix B Bibliographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff Hal Stern (Chair) is a professor and founding chair of statistics at the University of California at Irvine. Prior to joining the Irvine faculty in 2002, he held academic appointments at Iowa State University and Har- vard University. An expert in Bayesian modeling and techniques, he is coauthor of Bayesian Data Analysis. A fellow of the American Statistical Association (ASA), he has served as editor of the association’s magazine, Chance, and as chair of the association’s section on Bayesian science and the section on statistics in sports. He has M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University. Dan A. Black is a professor at the Harris School of the University of Chi- cago. His research interests are labor economics, applied econometrics, and program evaluation. He has been a visiting professor of economics at the H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management at Carnegie Mellon University. He has used the National Survey of College Graduates data in his research. He received B.A. and M.A. degrees in history from the University of Kansas, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Purdue University. Chester (Chet) Bowie is a senior vice president at the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) at the University of Chicago. He is a survey statistician with more than 30 years experience designing and conduct- ing cross-sectional and longitudinal household, educational institution, and business surveys for federal and state governments and academic 8

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8 APPENDIX B institutions. His work covers a broad range of substantive areas, including education, employment, health care, health insurance, outdoor recreation, disability, aging, alcohol and drug use, crime, homelessness, housing, pro- gram participation, long-term care, and income, as well as methodological research. Previously he worked at Market Strategies, International and as division director of the Demographic Surveys Division at the U.S. Census Bureau. While at the Census Bureau, he worked on the National Survey of College Graduates and the Survey of Recent College Graduates. He is a member of the ASA where he was chair of the Government Statistics Section, and the American Association for Public Opinion Research. He holds a master’s degree in governmental administration from the George Washington University. Brenda G. Cox is survey research leader in the Arlington, Virginia, office of Battelle Memorial Institute. She has 30 years of experience in sam- ple design and implementation for national, state, and local surveys on diverse topics, including education and career outcomes, health care utili- zation and expenditures, customer satisfaction and access to care, alcohol and substance abuse, crime victimization, nutrition and the homeless, emergency food assistance, child support enforcement, agricultural pro- duction, small business finances, and the environment. Since 1993, she has served as a senior statistical adviser for the Scientists and Engineers Statistical Data System (SESTAT) fellow of the ASA. Dr. Cox has served as chair of the Survey Research Methods Section, chair of the Council on Chapters, and as a member of the board of directors. She has also served as president of the Washington Statistical Society and of the North Caro- lina and Princeton-Trenton Chapters of the ASA. She holds a Ph.D. degree in statistics from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Randall J. Olsen is a professor of economics at the Ohio State University, where he is director of the Center for Human Resource Research and director of the Initiative in Population Economics. His fields are econo- metrics, labor economics, and economic demography. He is interested the problem of design effects in surveys, job mobility and a variety of issues relating to survey data collection. He has been the project director of the National Longitudinal Surveys of Labor Market Experience (NLS) since 1987, overseeing instrument design, field work, and data preparation for this group of surveys. He has also overseen the transition of the NLS from legacy data collection systems to an integrated system for handling all phases of survey work, from instrument authoring through data dis- semination. He has served as an associate editor for Evaluation Review, Journal of the American Statistical Association and Demography. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago.

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88 USING THE AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY Robert Santos is senior institute methodologist at the Urban Institute in Washington, DC. Previously he worked at NuStats, NORC at the Univer- sity of Chicago, and the Survey Research Center at the University of Mich- igan at Ann Arbor. His professional credits include more than 40 reports and papers and leadership roles in survey research associations. He has served as a member of the Census Advisory Committee of Professional Associations and on the editorial board of the Public Opinion Quarterly and held numerous elected and appointed leadership positions in both the ASA and the American Association for Public Opinion Research. He is a fellow of the ASA and a recipient of the 2006 ASA Founder’s Award for excellence in survey statistics and contributions to the statistical community. He received an M.A. degree in statistics from the University of Michigan. Lowell Taylor is a professor of economics at the H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management at Carnegie Mellon University. Prior to joining the Carnegie Mellon faculty, he taught in the economics depart- ments at Miami University and the University of Texas at Austin, and worked as a senior economist for President Clinton’s Council of Economic Advisers. His general research interests are labor markets, economic incentives within firms, and economic demography. His papers span a wide range of topics, including the economic impact of minimum wage policy, the causes of racial disparity in U.S. labor markets, the econom- ics of gay and lesbian families, and the nature of physician incentives in health maintenance organizations. He holds an M.A. degree in statistics, an M.A. degree in economics, and a Ph.D. degree in economics, all from the University of Michigan. Catherine Weinberger is a research scholar affiliated with the Depart- ment of Economics at the University of California at Santa Barbara and the Institute for Social, Behavioral, and Economic Research. Her research focuses on early educational experiences and later labor market outcomes, specializing in high school mathematics preparation, high school leader- ship experiences, the science and engineering workforce, and gender differences in labor market outcomes, and earnings growth in college graduate labor markets. She has used the National Survey of College Graduates data in her research. She has a B.S. degree in mathematics from the University of Wisconsin at Madison and an M.A. degree in mathemat- ics and Ph.D. degree in economics from the University of California at Berkeley.